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World War I 1914-1919 By: Gaby Rodriguez Stasha Smith
Life and Death in the Trenches
<ul><li>During the day, snipers and artillery observers in balloons made movement risky, so the trenches were mostly quiet...
Continued …  Trenches <ul><li>There were rat infestations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Millions of rats infested the trenches </l...
Weapons of War- Poison Gas <ul><li>The French were the first ones to use gas </li></ul><ul><li>April 22nd 1915 the first p...
Casualties From Gas- The Numbers 1,000 10,000 Others 1,462 72,807 USA 56,000 419,340 Russia 4,627 60,000 Italy 9,000 200,0...
Weapons of War- Tanks <ul><li>History with the tanks was made on September 15 1916, when Captain H. W. Mortimore guided a ...
Weapons of War- Trench Mortars <ul><li>The Mortar: a sort, stumpy tube designed to fire a projectile at a steep angle so t...
World War I Propaganda
Propaganda Posters <ul><li>Were used to justify involvement to their own populace, but also as a means of procuring… </li>...
Women in World War I <ul><li>Women served as Physical and Occupational Therapists. </li></ul><ul><li>They served as nurses...
Dorothy Lawrence <ul><li>During the war women were to be found mostly at the home or helping the wounded </li></ul><ul><li...
We remember them …  in Kansas: National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial <ul><li>World War I museum opened up on Dec...
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World War I

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World War I

  1. 1. World War I 1914-1919 By: Gaby Rodriguez Stasha Smith
  2. 2. Life and Death in the Trenches
  3. 3. <ul><li>During the day, snipers and artillery observers in balloons made movement risky, so the trenches were mostly quiet. </li></ul><ul><li>Really busy during the night </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The cover of darkness allowed the movement of troops and supplies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The greatest killer was disease. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sanitary conditions were poor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diseases like typhus and cholera </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor hygiene also led to conditions like trench mouth and trench foot. </li></ul></ul>Trenches
  4. 4. Continued … Trenches <ul><li>There were rat infestations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Millions of rats infested the trenches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Two types of rats: the brown and the black rat. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The brown rat was mostly feared because they fed themselves on human remains and could grow to the size of a cat. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lice would breed in the seams of filthy clothing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Caused men to itch unceasingly, causing Trench Fever. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Weapons of War- Poison Gas <ul><li>The French were the first ones to use gas </li></ul><ul><li>April 22nd 1915 the first poison gas, chlorine, was used. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Effects were severe </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Within seconds of inhaling its vapor it destroyed the victim’s respiratory organs, bringing choking attacks. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Phosgene- caused victims to violently cough and choke. </li></ul><ul><li>Mustard Gas- an odorless chemical </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brought serious blisters both internally and externally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protection against it was difficult </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chemical remained potent in soil for weeks after release </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Germans army ended the war as the heaviest user of gas. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Casualties From Gas- The Numbers 1,000 10,000 Others 1,462 72,807 USA 56,000 419,340 Russia 4,627 60,000 Italy 9,000 200,000 Germany 8,000 190,000 France 8,109 188,706 British Empire 3,000 100,000 Austria-Hungary Death Total Causalities Country
  7. 7. Weapons of War- Tanks <ul><li>History with the tanks was made on September 15 1916, when Captain H. W. Mortimore guided a D1 tank into action at the notorious Delville Wood. </li></ul><ul><li>They were usually used for fighting the trench warfare. </li></ul><ul><li>They sometimes broke down and became ditched </li></ul><ul><li>The tanks were hot inside from the heat generated and fumes often nearly choked the men inside. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Weapons of War- Trench Mortars <ul><li>The Mortar: a sort, stumpy tube designed to fire a projectile at a steep angle so that it falls straight down on the enemy. </li></ul><ul><li>It could be fired from the safety of the trench. </li></ul><ul><li>Lighter and more mobile than other artillery pieces. </li></ul><ul><li>The Stroke Mortar was 3 inches in size and weighted around 4.5 kg. </li></ul><ul><li>They could fire as many as 22 bombs per minute and had a maximum range of 1,200 yards. </li></ul>
  9. 9. World War I Propaganda
  10. 10. Propaganda Posters <ul><li>Were used to justify involvement to their own populace, but also as a means of procuring… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Men </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Money </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources to sustain the military campaign </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Women in World War I <ul><li>Women served as Physical and Occupational Therapists. </li></ul><ul><li>They served as nurses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At least three of them were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The nations second highest military honor </li></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Dorothy Lawrence <ul><li>During the war women were to be found mostly at the home or helping the wounded </li></ul><ul><li>The only woman soldier enlisted in the British Army </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed to pass herself as a man. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>20 year old ambitious journalist </li></ul><ul><li>Joined in 1915 </li></ul><ul><li>Gave herself in after 10 days worried about the safety of these man </li></ul><ul><li>Had to endure an absurd interrogatory </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorities thought she was a ‘camp follower’, or a prostitute </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. We remember them … in Kansas: National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial <ul><li>World War I museum opened up on December 2, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Imagined as a future possibility by the people of Kansas City. </li></ul><ul><li>Nations first official World War I museum </li></ul>

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