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    1. 1. A LOOK INTO FUEL AND FOOD ECONOMICSREDISCOVERING THE IMPORTANCE OF FARMING
    2. 2. THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    3. 3. THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    4. 4. BETW EEN PERC ENT ROS E 30 AS P RICES AND 2008G 2007THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    5. 5. ON AVERAGE FOOD TRAVELS 1,500 MILES BEFORE BEING CONSUMED BETW EEN PERC ENT ROS E 30 AS P RICES AND 2008G 2007THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    6. 6. ON AVERAGE FOOD TRAVELS 1,500 IN 1965, 787,000 COMBINATION MILES BEFORE BEING CONSUMED TRUCKS WERE REGISTERED IN THE UNITED STATES, AND CONSUMED 6.658 BILLION OF FUEL BETW EEN PERC ENT ROS E 30 AS P RICES AND 2008G 2007THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    7. 7. ON AVERAGE FOOD TRAVELS 1,500 IN 1965, 787,000 COMBINATION MILES BEFORE BEING CONSUMED TRUCKS WERE REGISTERED IN THE UNITED STATES, AND CONSUMED 6.658 BILLION OF FUEL IN 1997, THERE WERE 1,790,000 COMBINATION BETW EEN TRUCKS THAT USED 20.294 PERC ENT ROS E 30 BILLION GALLONS OF FUEL AS P RICES AND 2008G 2007THE OIL AND FOOD CRISISSECTION 1
    8. 8. DATA COLLECTED FOR THE STATE OF IOWABY RICH PIROG OF IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
    9. 9. Distance as if through Food Item Source Distance Traveled conventional channelsChuck Roast Dan Specht 75 miles 675 miles (CO) (Clayton County, IA)Potatoes Farmers Market 10-15 miles 1,300 miles (ID)Carrots Our garden 40 feet 1,700 miles (CA)Green Beans Our garden 40 feet 1,700 miles (CA)Onions Farmers Market 10-15 miles 1,700 miles (CA)Purple Cabbage Farmers Market 10-15 miles 1,700 miles (CA)Tomatoes Our garden 40 feet 1,700 miles (CA)Yellow Peppers Farmers Market 10-15 miles 1,700 miles (CA)Olive Bread Farmers Market 10-15 miles 1,700 miles (CA) Total Miles: 150 miles 13,875 milesDATA COLLECTED FOR THE STATE OF IOWABY RICH PIROG OF IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
    10. 10. LOCAL AND URBAN AGRICULTURESECTION 2
    11. 11. “GIVEN THE HIGH ENERGY COSTS OF TRANSPORTING FOOD FROM DISTANT PLACES, ACCOMPANIED BY THE CONTINUED LOSS OF FARMLAND IN METROPOLITAN AREAS, THERE IS INCREASING INTEREST IN GROWING MORE FOOD LOCALLY AND REGIONALLY” (KAUFMAN 6)LOCAL AND URBAN AGRICULTURESECTION 2
    12. 12. SubsistenceAgriculture
    13. 13. SubsistenceAgriculture“Subsistence production is cited as away to reduce householdexpenditures on food, which averages52-83% of income” (Nugent 72).
    14. 14. COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE IN CHICAGOSubsistenceAgriculture“Subsistence production is cited as away to reduce householdexpenditures on food, which averages52-83% of income” (Nugent 72).
    15. 15. URBAN AGRICULTURE: THE ENVIRONMENTSECTION 3
    16. 16. IT IS “ESTIMATED THAT SINCE WORLD WAR II, POOR FARMING PRACTICES HAS DAMAGED ABOUT 550 MILLION HECTARES—AN AREA EQUIVALENT TO 38% OF ALL FARMLAND IN USE TODAY” (HORIGGAN 447)URBAN AGRICULTURE: THE ENVIRONMENTSECTION 3
    17. 17. IT IS “ESTIMATED THAT SINCE WORLD WAR II, POOR FARMING PRACTICES HAS THE USE OF HEAVY EQUIPMENT, DAMAGED ABOUT 550 MILLION PESTICIDES, AND FERTILIZERS, HECTARES—AN AREA EQUIVALENT TO HAS SIGNIFICANTLY DAMAGED 38% OF ALL FARMLAND IN USE THE LAND AND CROPS TODAY” (HORIGGAN 447)URBAN AGRICULTURE: THE ENVIRONMENTSECTION 3
    18. 18. USE NATURAL PROCESSES: THE USE OF HEAVY EQUIPMENT, MANPOWER, INSECT REPELLENT PESTICIDES, AND FERTILIZERS, HERBS, AND COMPOST. HAS SIGNIFICANTLY DAMAGED THE LAND AND CROPSURBAN AGRICULTURE: THE ENVIRONMENTSECTION 3
    19. 19. THIS WILL STABILIZE SOIL USE NATURAL PROCESSES: FERTILITY, CLEAN THE AIR, AND MANPOWER, INSECT REPELLENT REDUCE OF COURSE THE CARBON HERBS, AND COMPOST. EMITTED BY HAVING FOOD SHIPPED.URBAN AGRICULTURE: THE ENVIRONMENTSECTION 3
    20. 20. STRUCTURE OF AN URBAN FARMSECTION 4
    21. 21. COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA)
    22. 22. “IN ITS SIMPLEST FORM, CSA IS AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN A FARM AND A GROUP OF CONSUMERS VARIOUSLY DESCRIBED AS “SHAREHOLDERS”... MEMBERS PURCHASE A “SHARE” AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SEASON” (CONE 187)COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA)
    23. 23. Conclusion
    24. 24. ConclusionWith the rise in oil and food prices, it becomes necessary that we find asolution to to decrease the transportation distances of food.
    25. 25. ConclusionWith the rise in oil and food prices, it becomes necessary that we find asolution to to decrease the transportation distances of food.Using sustainable growing practices, one can take care of theenvironment.
    26. 26. ConclusionWith the rise in oil and food prices, it becomes necessary that we find asolution to to decrease the transportation distances of food.Using sustainable growing practices, one can take care of theenvironment.Growing locally is a significant opportunity for supporting the localeconomy.
    27. 27. ConclusionWith the rise in oil and food prices, it becomes necessary that we find asolution to to decrease the transportation distances of food.Using sustainable growing practices, one can take care of theenvironment.Growing locally is a significant opportunity for supporting the localeconomy.In urban agriculture, there is a vast field for entrepreneurial activity.
    28. 28. ConclusionWith the rise in oil and food prices, it becomes necessary that we find asolution to to decrease the transportation distances of food.Using sustainable growing practices, one can take care of theenvironment.Growing locally is a significant opportunity for supporting the localeconomy.In urban agriculture, there is a vast field for entrepreneurial activity.CSA/Co-op’s are a great way to get involved in urban agriculture.
    29. 29. Q&A

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