Brand challenge scrubs

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Brand challenge scrubs

  1. 1.   Brand  Brief:  Wormwood  Scrubs  Community  Chaplaincy  Mentoring  Scheme       Background  to  the  Brand  Challenge     Over  the  past  two  or  three  years  there  has  been  a  dramatic  growth  in  the  size  and   effectiveness  of  the  scheme  for  mentoring  prisoners  through  the  gates  of  HMP   Wormwood  Scrubs.  The  scheme  works  by  the  Chaplaincy  partnering  prisoners  with   external  mentors  so  they  can  build  a  relationship  built  on  mutual  trust  prior  to  release,   which  can  then  be  continued  on  the  outside  to  help  prisoners  cope  better  with  the   challenges  of  surviving  in  an  often  unwelcoming  world.     The  scheme  works  because:       -­‐  the  mentors  are  volunteers   -­‐  the  mentors:     -­‐  are  carefully  selected   -­‐  are  well  trained   -­‐  are  carefully  partnered    with  prisoners   -­‐  are  well  supported   -­‐  it  is  efficiently  run  by  the  Chaplaincy  office   -­‐  it  is  well  led  by  Kabir  Uddin     The  lack  of  a  snappy  identity  or  brand  (see  title  above)  has  to  date  been  an   inconvenience  rather  than  a  problem.     The  situation  has  now  changed,  making  a  concise  identity  necessary         Specifically:     -­‐  Radical  government  changes  to  service  provision  in  prisons  mean  that   mentoring  will  come  within  the  umbrella  of  outside  consortia  bidding  to  provide   a  wide  range  of  services  to  prisons  currently  supplied  by  the  prisons  themselves     -­‐  Separately,  within  one  to  two  years  these  service  groupings  may  again  change,   as  areas  such  as  probation  and  re-­‐habilitation  are  outsourced       -­‐  These  changes  may  well  include  the  functions  of  the  Chaplaincy  being   outsourced,  or  included  within  other  service  functions     -­‐  Geographical  areas  covered  by  service  providers  are  likely  to  increase  (already   Tri-­‐borough  (Kensington,  Chelsea,  Hammersmith  &  Fulham)  funding  indicates   the  Wormwood  Scrubs  nomenclature  is  both  inaccurate  and  limiting),  See  end  of   brief  for  latest  position.     These  factors  indicate  that  the  first  four  words  of  our  current  title  may  no  longer  be   appropriate.  The  final  two  words  currently  don’t  figure  in  our  description  of  ourselves,   and  are  probably  not  be  necessary  in  any  case,  so  we  have  a  vacuum  to  fill.     Our  religious  origins  are  obviously  important,  but  many  charitable  groups  working  in   prisons  retain  their  religious  ethos  and  mission,  without  including  it  in  their  brand  name   (Stepping  Stones;  etc).       1  
  2. 2. We  are  therefore  looking  for  a  name  (which  would  ideally  develop  into  a  brand)  to  give   us  a  stand-­‐out  identity.  This  identity  would  resonate  with  all  our  stakeholders:     -­‐our  clients  (the  prisoners)   -­‐our  volunteers  (the  mentors)   -­‐our  supporters  (including  large  and  small  funders)   -­‐our  staff   -­‐our  potential  future  service  commissioners  (Serco  etc)       There  follows  a  brief  to  a  branding  agency  to  develop  such  a  brand  name,  coupled  with   a  simple  graphic  and  tag  line.     BRIEF     This  brief  follows  one  of  the  classic  briefs  for  brands,  developed  by  Doyle  Dane  (now   Adam  &  Eve  DDB),  a  global  advertising  and  marketing  agency  with  a  long  and   distinguished  track  record  in  brand  development.       1.  Where  do  I  come  from?     Summary:  The  Chaplaincy  of  Wormwood  Scrubs  prison,  which  has  a  long  record  of   pastoral  care  and  support  for  prisoners  with  psychological,  emotional  and  spiritual   challenges  whilst  in  prison.  Over  the  past  two  or  three  years  this  support  has  extended  to  a   mentoring  scheme  that  supports  selected  prisoners  once  they  leave  prison,  and  need  to   cope  with  what  is  often  an  intimidating  world.     The  Chaplaincy  of  Wormwood  Scrubs  prison  has  been  a  support  for  prisoners  of  all   faiths  for  many  years.  More  than  a  decade  ago  a  Befriending  Scheme  was  developed,   which  allowed  the  Chaplaincy  to  pair  up  volunteers  on  the  outside  with  selected   prisoners  on  the  inside  to  give  them  emotional  support  and  encouragement.  This  was   particularly  beneficial  as  at  the  time  the  prison  held  many  prisoners  serving  life   sentences,  many  of  whom  were  desperate  for  outside  contact,  as  friends  and  family  had   often  lost  contact  with  them.     Over  the  past  five  years  the  prison  no  longer  holds  lifers,  and  has  become  a  prison  for   local  offenders,  plus  people  arrested  at  Heathrow.  In  response  to  the  changed  clientele,   the  Chaplaincy  has  developed  the  Mentoring  scheme.       This  differs  from  the  Befriending  Scheme  in  two  key  aspects.  Firstly,  it  connects   prisoners  with  mentors  4  -­‐  8  weeks  before  release,  with  the  goal  of  their  establishing   friendship  and  trust,  so  they  can  meet  them  on  release  at  the  gate  and  support  them  on   the  outside,  once  they  are  back  in  the  community.  Secondly,  the  mentors  undergo   extensive  training  prior  to  being  linked  to  a  prisoner,  and  receive  ongoing  top-­‐up   training  thereafter.     (Prisoners  are  met  at  the  Gate  on  release  by  Mentors  because  there  is  an  extremely  high   tendency  for  prisoners  to  panic,  and  spend  their  release  money  on  drugs  or  alcohol.   Indeed  drug  traffickers  gather  between  the  prison  and  the  Tube  station  to  take   advantage  of  this  vulnerability).     Already  the  scheme  is  having  a  significant  impact,  with  mentored  prisoners  showing  a   significant  reduction  in  re-­‐offending  against  the  average.     2  
  3. 3.   2.  Where  is  my  world  going?     Summary  :  Austerity  measures  are  affecting  both  support  in  prisons  and  social  care  on  the   outside.  This  means  that  strong  volunteer  organisations  need  to  step  into  the  vacuum  to   support  prisoners  pre  and  post  release,  when  they  are  often  well  intentioned  but  highly   vulnerable  to  slipping  back  into  their  previous  offending  behaviour.  Significantly  for  us,  the   government  sees  mentoring  as  a  potentially  highly  effective  way  of  reducing  re-­offending,   and  the  high  cost  associated  with  it.     The  government  is  intent  on  stripping  out  inefficiency  and  cost  from  all  public  services.   The  Scrubs  is  currently  charged  with  reducing  its  headcount  by  approximately  20%.   Large  outsourcing  firms  have  been  asked  to  bid  for  many  of  the  services  currently   provided  by  the  prison  service,  as  well  as  collateral  services  on  the  outside.  Separately,   the  Probation  service  will  be  put  out  to  tender.     On  the  positive  side,  the  Government  sees  mentoring  as  a  significant  opportunity  to  cut   down  on  re-­‐offending,  which  is  a  huge  cost  to  the  taxpayer.     In  order  to  avoid  being  swallowed  up  or  terminated,  the  Community  Chaplaincy   mentoring  scheme  at  the  Scrubs  has  gone  onto  the  front  foot.  It  has  formed  itself  into  a   charity,  hugely  increased  its  recruitment,  training,  and  activity  generally,  in  order  to   provide  a  significantly  enhanced  service  to  prisoners.  It  is  part  of  a  bidding  consortium   with  Serco  for  a  Tri-­‐boroughs  (Kensington,  Westminster  and  Hammersmith  &  Fulham)   contract  to  manage  prisoner  release.     Looking  to  the  future,  it  is  possible  that  the  charity  could  bid  for  work  not  just  within   wider  London,  but  nationally.  It  is  also  conceivable  that  it  might  move  beyond   mentoring  work  into  overall  rehabilitation,  working  in  conjunction  with  other   organisations.       3.  What  do  I  do?       Summary:  the  charity  recruits  and  trains  volunteers  from  the  community  to  mentor   prisoners.  It  believes  that  people  of  different  faiths  or  no  faith  can  work  together  in  order   to  help  prisoners  rebuild  their  lives.  Its  mission  is  to  provide  practical  and  emotional   support  by  promoting  healing,  forgiveness,  personal  growth  and  development  to   prisoners  before  and  after  their  release  from  prison.     The  mentors  are  recruited  across  a  wide  range  of  backgrounds,  experience,  ages,   ethnicities,  and  faiths/no  faiths.  They  share  a  common  desire  to  help  people  who  very   often  have  not  been  dealt  a  great  hand  in  life,  and  express  a  desire  to  rebuild  their  lives   once  released.       The  challenge  on  release  for  many  offenders  to  find  accommodation,  work  and  to  stay   out  of  trouble  is  considerable.  Timely  and  sensitive  help  and  advice  from  a  mentor  can   make  the  difference  between  going  straight,  or  taking  the  easy  course  and  going  go  back   onto  alcohol/drugs,  associating  with  the  wrong  people,  and  re-­‐offending  as  a  route  out   of  desperation.     In  today’s  climate,  finding  accommodation  and  employment  for  any  young  person  is   challenging.  For  those  who  frequently  have  very  poor  education,  poor  communication   skills  and  very  low  self-­‐confidence  (plus  a  prison  record)  it  can  be  daunting.  A     3  
  4. 4. mentor/friend,  who  has  no  axe  to  grind,  and  can  offer  no-­‐strings-­‐attached  friendship   can  tip  the  balance  in  favour  of  persevering,  and  not  re-­‐offending.     4.  What  makes  me  unique?     Summary:  We  are  volunteers  with  no  agenda.  We  focus  on  unconditional  acceptance,   build  relationships  steadily  and  seek  only  success  for  the  mentee.     As  volunteers,  we  have  an  independence  that  transcends  the  fads  of  government  penal   policy.  We  are  also  rounded  enough  to  focus  on  the  needs  of  individual  prisoners,   without  the  need  to  hit  numbers  to  justify  our  existence.     As  a  result,  we  can  focus  single-­‐mindedly  on  the  needs  of  the  prisoners,  in  order  to  help   achieve  the  best  outcome  for  them.     Non-­‐judgmental  conversations  can  take  place.  The  individual  behind  the  role  of  prisoner   can  be  nurtured.  They  want  to  move  on  –  to  be  free  to  start  considering  their  lives.  They   are  given  the  space  to  make  choices,  without  the  pressure  of  coping  with  the  often  time-­‐ pressed  agenda  of  the  drugs  counselor,  social  worker  or  probation  officer.     Quite  strong  relationships  can  develop,  as  they  are  unconditional,  something  quite  new   and  unusual  for  most  of  them.  Any  transformation  that  takes  place  has  to  be  an  inner   one.  They  have  to  do  it  themselves,  and  this  part  of  the  journey  is  gentle  for  them.  It   moves  at  their  pace,  and  they  benefit  at  the  rate  they  are  open  to  benefiting.  When  they   are  ready  for  it,  they  will  have  the  strength  to  make  choices.     5.  What  is  my  community?     Summary:     Volunteers:  friendly,  generous,  but  realistic  about  what  they  can  achieve   Chaplaincy:  enthusiastic,  committed,  efficient  and  effective.   Tri-­borough  partnership:  supportive,  but  of  necessity,  at  a  distance.   Prisoners:  An  opportunity  to  talk  to  someone  without  an  agenda,  whom  they  can  trust     The  Volunteers:  The  volunteers  come  from  a  wide  variety  of  backgrounds.  Many  are   religious,  but  several  are  not.  Many  are  from  professional  or  management  backgrounds,   but  several  are  not.  All  share  the  understanding  that  most  prisoners  come  from  under-­‐ privileged  backgrounds,  are  poorly  educated,  are  fundamentally  good  people  who  want   to  escape  the  spiral  of  crime  and  imprisonment  they  find  themselves  in.  They  are  non-­‐ judgmental,  and  want  to  help.   The  Chaplaincy:  The  Chaplaincy  is  charged  with  organizing  the  process  of  mentoring   prisoners  through  the  gate,  which  the  Justice  Ministry  see  as  a  key  plank  in  their   strategy  to  reduce  re-­‐offending.    The  leadership  of  the  Chaplaincy  under  Kabir  Uddin,  a   young  Imam  of  outstanding  energy,  people  skills  and  kindness,  enables  a  very  wide   cross  section  of  prisoners  to  be  supported  by  mentors.  The  Chaplaincy  has  developed  a   very  high  quality  of  training,  sometimes  from  outside  agencies,  for  the  volunteers.   Tri-­Borough  Partnership:  (Kensington,  Chelsea,  Hammersmith  &  Fulham)  The   boroughs  have  an  interest  in  reducing  re-­‐offending  as  the  prisoners  released  back  into   their  territories  are  once  more  their  responsibility  to  shelter,  and  anything  that  makes   them  productive  and  contributing  citizens,  rather  than  the  reverse,  is  very  much  in  their   interest.   The  Prisoners:  The  mentees,  like  the  mentors,  are  of  all  faiths  and  none.  They  are   generally  people  of  good  intention  who  are  committed  to  trying  to  go  straight  on  the   outside,  and  to  re-­‐build  their  lives.     4  
  5. 5.   6.  What  am  I  like?  How  do  I  behave?     Summary:     -­  Completely  without  judgement,  and  acknowledging  the  difficult  backgrounds  and   restricted  life  chances  of  the  people  we  deal  with   -­Fair,  but  tough-­minded,  no  pushover,  but  understanding  and  resilient     We  don’t  judge  people  on  what  they  have  done,  and  believe  they  can  grow  in  both  self-­‐ knowledge  and  self-­‐confidence.   There  is  a  strong  sense  of    “there  but  for  the  grace  of  God  go  I”.     These  people  are  sometimes  difficult  to  love,  but  are  loved  none  the  less.     This  is  about  nurturing  and  human  dignity.       7.  What  is  my  fight?     Summary:  To  liberate  and  empower  prisoners  so  they  believe  they  are  worthwhile  human   beings  who  can  survive  on  the  outside  and  have  a  friend  when  things  get  difficult.     Many  of  the  prisoners,  despite  their  bluster,  and  well-­‐rehearsed  stories  of  their   innocence,  are  deeply  lacking  in  self-­‐confidence.  They  have  never  in  their  lives  felt   valued.       Part  of  the  role  of  the  mentor  is  to  give  them  the  feeling  that,  perhaps  for  the  first  time  in   their  lives,  someone  believes  in  them.  And  will  be  there  for  them.       8.  What  is  the  brand  idea?     Empowerment  through  friendship                                                     5  
  6. 6. Summary:  Wormwood  Scrubs  Community  Chaplaincy  Mentoring  Scheme     1.  Where  do  I  come  from?     The  Chaplaincy  of  Wormwood  Scrubs  prison,  which  has  a  long  record  of  pastoral  care  and   support  for  prisoners  with  psychological,  emotional  and  spiritual  challenges  whilst  in   prison.  Over  the  past  two  or  three  years  this  support  has  extended  to  a  mentoring  scheme   that  supports  selected  prisoners  once  they  leave  prison,  and  need  to  cope  with  what  is  often   an  intimidating  world.     2.  Where  is  my  world  going?     Austerity  measures  are  affecting  both  support  in  prisons  and  social  care  on  the  outside.   This  means  that  strong  volunteer  organisations  need  to  step  into  the  vacuum  to  support   prisoners  pre  and  post  release,  when  they  are  often  well  intentioned  but  highly  vulnerable   to  slipping  back  into  their  previous  offending  behaviour.     3.  What  do  I  do?       The  charity  recruits  and  trains  volunteers  from  the  community  to  mentor  prisoners.  It   believes  that  people  of  different  faiths  or  no  faith  can  work  together  in  order  to  help   prisoners  rebuild  their  lives.  Its  mission  is  to  provide  practical  and  emotional  support  by   promoting  healing,  forgiveness,  personal  growth  and  development  to  prisoners  before  and   after  their  release  from  prison.     4.  What  makes  me  unique?     We  are  volunteers  with  no  agenda.  We  focus  on  unconditional  acceptance,  build   relationships  steadily  and  seek  only  success  for  the  mentee.     5.  What  is  my  community?     Volunteers:  friendly,  generous,  but  realistic  about  what  they  can  achieve   Chaplaincy:  enthusiastic,  committed,  efficient  and  effective.   Tri-­borough  partnership:  supportive,  but  of  necessity,  at  a  distance.   Prisoners:  An  opportunity  to  talk  to  someone  without  an  agenda,  whom  they  can  trust     6.  What  am  I  like?  How  do  I  behave?     Completely  without  judgment,  and  acknowledging  the  difficult  backgrounds  and  restricted   life  chances  of  the  people  we  deal  with   -­Fair,  but  tough-­minded,  no  pushover,  but  understanding  and  resilient     7.  What  is  my  fight?     To  liberate  and  empower  prisoners  so  they  believe  they  are  worthwhile  human  beings  who   can  survive  on  the  outside  and  have  a  friend  when  things  get  difficult.     8.  What  is  the  brand  idea?     Empowerment  through  friendship     NB  Please  check  any  possible  brand  names  on  the  internet,  as  some  branding  activity  is   already  taking  place  in  this  area  (eg  Through  the  Gate)     6  
  7. 7.       Update  1.11.13     We  have  just  heard  that  our  consortium  has  been  successful  in  the  Tri-­‐borough  bid.       In  the  short  term,  this  changes  little,  apart  from  supercharging  our  enthusiasm  and   efforts  to  develop  the  effectiveness  and  scale  of  our  activities  at  Wormwood  Scrubs.     In  the  longer  term  it  potentially  will  change  the  scope  of  our  service,  both  geographically   and  in  terms  of  services  supplied.       In  practical  terms,  this  means:     -­‐ we  could  extend  our  model  of  mentee  training  and  development  to   other  prisons  in  the  three  boroughs,  and  subsequently  on  a  national   basis.   -­‐ we  could  extend  into  other  sectors  of  prisoner  care  and  development,   both  in  prisons,  and  in  their  communities     This  does  not  in  any  way  affect  our  brand  essence.  We  will  still  be  about  the   empowerment  of  prisoners  (and  ex-­prisoners)  through  friendship.     7  

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