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The Future of Knowledge in the Age of Wikipedia - REMIXNYC 2014

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The Future of Knowledge in the Age of Wikipedia, talks about the history of the world's most popular reference work, how galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) have come to work with it, and the challenges to Wikipedia's growth. We also describe how Wikipedia solves the "knowledge gap" problem by being the unusual blend of speed, depth and accuracy.

Subjects discussed: Smithsonian, British Museum, National Archives, VOX, Ezra Klein, Wikidata, Histropedia, Wikipedia, mobiles, Jimmy Wales, Ward Cunningham, Larry Sanger.

By: Andrew Lih of American University and author of The Wikipedia Revolution: How a bunch of nobodies created the world's greatest encyclopedia.

Published in: Technology
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The Future of Knowledge in the Age of Wikipedia - REMIXNYC 2014

  1. 1. The'Future'of'Knowledge in'the'age'of'Wikipedia Andrew'Lih' http://andrewlih.com' Twitter:'Fuzheado'' Email:lih@american.edu September'19,'2014 REMIX'Summit'NYC Associate'professor'of'journalism' American'University'School'of'Communication
  2. 2. Andrew'Lih' author'of''The'Wikipedia'Revolution Twitter:'@Fuzheado LIH article discussion view source history access to the sum of all human knowledge. ANDREW Nobodies of Bunch a How REVOLUTION WIKIPEDIA THE HOW A BUNCH OF NOBODIES CREATED THE WORLD’S GREATEST ENCYCLOPEDIA U.S. $24.99 “Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge. That’s what we’re doing.” —Jimmy Wales With more than 2,000,000 individual articles on everything from Aa! (a Japanese pop group) to Zzyzx, California, written by an army of volunteer contributors, Wikipedia is the #8 site on the World Wide Web. Created (and corrected) by anyone with access to a computer, this impressive assemblage of knowledge is growing at an astonishing rate of more than 30,000,000 words a month. Now for the first time, a Wikipedia insider tells the story of how it all happened—from the first glimmer of an idea to the global phenomenon it’s become. Andrew Lih has been an administrator (a trusted user who is granted access to technical features) at Wikipedia for more than four years, as well as a regular host of the weekly Wikipedia podcast. In The Wikipedia Revolution, he details the site’s inception in 2001, its evolution, and its remarkable growth, while also explaining its larger cultural repercussions. Wikipedia is not just a website; it’s a global commu-nity of contributors who have banded together out of a shared passion for making knowledge free. Featuring a Foreword by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales and an Afterword that is itself a Wikipedia creation. Wikipedia Revolution Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia navigation, search This article is about the book. For the different, similar terms related to Wikipedia, see Wikipedia (terminology). Wikipedia’s non-encyclopedic visitor introduction, see Wikipedia:About. Revolution (pronunciation ) is the story of the free,[1] multilingual ency-clopedia project supported by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. The website’s name portmanteau of the words wiki (a technology for creating collaborative websites) and encyclopedia. Wikipedia’s 10 million articles have been written collaboratively by volun-teers around the world, and almost all of its articles can be edited by anyone who can Wikipedia website.[2] Launched in 2001 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger,[3] it currently the largest and most popular[1] general reference work on the Internet.[4][5][6] Wikipedia Revolution traces Wikipedia’s phenomenal success back to its roots, and the people who have contributed to its stated mission of giving every single person Created the World’s Greatest Encyclopedia ISBN: 978-1-4013-0371-6 ANDREW L IH the Introduction to The Wikipedia Revolution Wikipedia founder, Jimmy Wales now, it’s hard not to use the Internet without experiencing Wikipedia in searches and surfing. It has become an incredibly useful Internet resource in languages. Yet when you use Wikipedia, you may not understand the philosophy behind it. book tells the story of how Wikipedia began and evolved from a traditional encyclopedia into the intricate global community that it is today.
  3. 3. Case of Wikipedia
  4. 4. Problem with Wikipedia... Works in practice, but not in theory by bored-now@flickr, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution NC License
  5. 5. Jimmy Wales By WiLLGT09@flickr, file is licensed under Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 Generic
  6. 6. Larry Sanger by SimSullen, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License
  7. 7. Nupedia (2000) 1.Assignment 2.Finding a lead reviewer 3.Lead review 4.Open review 5.Lead copyediting 6.Open copyediting 7.Final approval and markup
  8. 8. How many articles?
  9. 9. 1 year = 12 articles By observing life@flickr, file is licensed under Attribution 2.0 Generic
  10. 10. Something had to change
  11. 11. Ward Cunningham This file is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License
  12. 12. Wikipedia Growth 2007
  13. 13. Wikipedia’s rank ComScore: Top 5 Alexa: Top 6 ! Consistently outranked only by Google, Yahoo, Microsoft Comscore: Nov 2009 Alexa: May 2012 Photo by: victoriapeckham@flickr, Creative Commons
  14. 14. Wikipedia articles Roughly: 4.5 million English articles 31+ million total articles 270+ languages (April 2014) by bored-now@flickr, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution NC License
  15. 15. Wikipedia printed English Wikipedia 1,980 volumes 10 stacks
  16. 16. Wikipedia traffic 20 bln pageviews/month 500 mln unique visitors/month ! (April 2014) http://reportcard.wmflabs.org/#core-graphs-tab; by bored-now@flickr, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution NC License
  17. 17. Wikipedia editors (global) 75,000 users > 5 edits/month 11,000 users > 100 edits/month ! (April 2014) by bored-now@flickr, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution NC License http://stats.wikimedia.org/reportcard/
  18. 18. Core policies Core Policies • Neutral point of view (NPOV) • Verifiability (V) • Reliable sources (RS) • Conflict of interest (COI) Neutral point of view (NPOV) Verifiability (V) Reliable sources (RS) Conflict of interest (COI)
  19. 19. Wikipedia’s role News cycle to historical record
  20. 20. Information*Priorities
  21. 21. Information*Priorities Accuracy
  22. 22. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Accuracy
  23. 23. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Accuracy
  24. 24. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Journalism Accuracy
  25. 25. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Journalism Accuracy Spot news
  26. 26. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Live news Journalism Accuracy Spot news
  27. 27. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Live news Journalism Accuracy Spot news Investigative
  28. 28. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Live news Journalism Accuracy Spot news Investigative
  29. 29. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Live news Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative
  30. 30. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Scholarly research Live news
  31. 31. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Scholarly research Live news Books
  32. 32. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Scholarly research Live news Film Books
  33. 33. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Encyclopedias Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Scholarly research Live news Film Books
  34. 34. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Museums Encyclopedias Scholarly research Live news Film Books
  35. 35. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Museums Encyclopedias Scholarly research Live news Film Books
  36. 36. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Features Journalism History Accuracy Spot news Investigative Museums Encyclopedias Scholarly research Live news Film Knowledge Gap Books
  37. 37. Core policies Knowledge Gap • Neutral point of view (NPOV) • Verifiability (V) • Reliable sources (RS) • Conflict of interest (COI) Too old for the news Too new for the history books
  38. 38. Core policies Inadequacy of the News "Trying to determine what is going on in the world by reading newspapers is like trying to tell • Neutral point of view (NPOV) • Verifiability (V) • Reliable sources (RS) • Conflict of interest (COI) the time by watching the second hand of a clock" -Ben Hecht
  39. 39. Core policies Curating the News • Neutral point of view (NPOV) • Verifiability (V) • Reliable sources (RS) • Conflict of interest (COI) Wikipedia changes everything
  40. 40. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Spot news Museums Encyclopedias Features Journalism History Accuracy Scholarly research Live news Film Investigative Books
  41. 41. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Spot news Museums Encyclopedias Features Journalism History Accuracy Scholarly research Live news Film Investigative Wikipedia Books
  42. 42. Information*Priorities 2001 Peer production Speed Depth Spot news Museums Encyclopedias Features Journalism History Accuracy Scholarly research Live news Film Investigative Wikipedia Books
  43. 43. Information*Priorities 2005 Topic coverage Speed Depth Spot news Museums Encyclopedias Features Journalism History Accuracy Scholarly research Live news Film Investigative Wikipedia Books
  44. 44. Information*Priorities Speed Depth Spot news Museums WFeatureiskipedia Encyclopedias Books Journalism History Accuracy Scholarly research Live news Film Investigative
  45. 45. Wikipedia Revolution • “Crowd” delivers the hardest parts: speed and depth • Wikipedia’s accuracy increasing with time
  46. 46. Knowledge Gap News History
  47. 47. News Wikipedia History
  48. 48. open content collaboration Commons multimedia News Wikipedia History open authority GLAM wiki
  49. 49. open content collaboration startups Commons multimedia News Wikipedia History WikiData data journalism open authority GLAM wiki
  50. 50. Wikipedian in residence 2010: Liam Wyatt at British Museum [[Rosetta stone]] article had 5x more traffic than on museum’s own site (2009)
  51. 51. Dominic McDevitt-Parks Wikipedian in residence US National Archives
  52. 52. David Ferriero National Archives and Records Administration Archivist of the United States
  53. 53. #WikiAPA Edit-a-thon Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
  54. 54. Cultural appropriation/historical accuracy National Museum of the American Indian
  55. 55. Challenges for Wikipedia
  56. 56. Wikipedia growth slowdown
  57. 57. Mobiles Multimedia Community 33% of Wikipedia traffic is mobile; 50% by 2025 What does this mean for participation? Input methods, browsing/ creating
  58. 58. Mobiles Multimedia Community How to make a culture of collaborative multimedia? Video and interactivity tools?
  59. 59. Mobiles Multimedia Community Are online communities sustainable? Wikipedia as teenager Curated collection vs attic
  60. 60. Uncharted territory ! GLAM'Wiki'US'Consortium' PBS'Mediashift'podcast ! Find'me,'Tweet'me,'tell'me'your'story ! Andrew'Lih' http://andrewlih.com' Twitter:'Fuzheado'' Email:lih@american.! edu Associate'professor'of'journalism' American'University'School'of'Communication

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