Post-socialist Moscow <ul><li>Beyond the consumerist paradise </li></ul>Anna Fenko, Department of Industrial Design
From communism to consumerism:  20 years of transition
 
Ideology is at rest. What has taken it’s place? Another ideology: consumerism.
GUM (Main Department Store), or the Upper Trading Rows, were built between 1890 and 1893 by Alexander Pomerantsev (respons...
In the end of 2008 the total space of shopping centres in Moscow amounted to 3,9 million sq/m. The rental price is approxi...
Underground shopping mall “Okhotny Ryad” near Kremlin is the largest in Europe. It was built in 1997 by Zurab Tsereteli, r...
Auchan, the French hypermarket chain, opened the first Russian store in 2002. Now it has 29 hypermarkets and supermarkets ...
To drive to the hypermarket at the outskirts of Moscow, you need a car. At the beginning of 2009 the population of Moscow ...
<ul><li>Buying expensive cars has become a new Russian obsession . </li></ul>
<ul><li>The city never sleeps. It never stops spending money… Mercer Human Resource Consulting claims Moscow is now the wo...
<ul><li>Shops are open 24/7. Traffic is also pretty bad all night…  </li></ul>
You go shopping not because you need something…
But because shopping is fun!
<ul><li>When you are tired, you can have a cup of cappuccino ($10)  </li></ul><ul><li>in one of the fancy coffee shops. </...
<ul><li>And forget about saving on electricity: energy is the only thing we produce. </li></ul>
Traffic jams are only the half of the problem.
Another problem is the lack of parking space. And in Moscow you need not just a parking space, but a real shelter for you ...
Here is the solution: metal tents, so-called “shells”. Cheap, efficient and ugly…
And here is the reaction of the Moscow authorities… Since 2007 they removed 7.000 illegal car tents. But about 160.000 are...
Solution #2: Don’t drive a car, buy locally! 30% of all turnover in Russia comes from street retail.
Officially authorized…
And not exactly authorised…
You can buy knitted socks and sweaters…
… or flowers
But what’s left after the sale is over?  Yes, a lot of garbage!
Garbage bins: A source of inspiration…
… and of some useful stuff!
Inhabitants of Moscow produce 5,5 million ton of garbage a year.  Garbage removal industry is organized officially…
… and locally.
Propositions to discuss: <ul><li>1) In the socialist period public spaces were mostly used for demonstration of the ideolo...
Questions to think of: <ul><li>What can designers and architects do to fill the gap between two types of public places? </...
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Post Socialist Russia: Beyond the consumerist paradise

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Slides from Anna Fenko's talk on April 22nd at the meeting of the Post Socialist Russia Project.

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Post Socialist Russia: Beyond the consumerist paradise

  1. 1. Post-socialist Moscow <ul><li>Beyond the consumerist paradise </li></ul>Anna Fenko, Department of Industrial Design
  2. 2. From communism to consumerism: 20 years of transition
  3. 4. Ideology is at rest. What has taken it’s place? Another ideology: consumerism.
  4. 5. GUM (Main Department Store), or the Upper Trading Rows, were built between 1890 and 1893 by Alexander Pomerantsev (responsible for architecture) and Vladimir Shukhov (responsible for engineering). The façade faces the Red Square. The glass roof (14 meters in diameter) made the building unique at the time of construction .
  5. 6. In the end of 2008 the total space of shopping centres in Moscow amounted to 3,9 million sq/m. The rental price is approximately $2.000 a year per sq/m.
  6. 7. Underground shopping mall “Okhotny Ryad” near Kremlin is the largest in Europe. It was built in 1997 by Zurab Tsereteli, responsible for many new, shiny, and tasteless buildings in Moscow. The total space is 70.000 sq/m, the rent is about $6.000 a year per sq/m.
  7. 8. Auchan, the French hypermarket chain, opened the first Russian store in 2002. Now it has 29 hypermarkets and supermarkets in Russia, 12 of them are in the Moscow area.
  8. 9. To drive to the hypermarket at the outskirts of Moscow, you need a car. At the beginning of 2009 the population of Moscow was 10,6 million, with 2,6 million car owners.
  9. 10. <ul><li>Buying expensive cars has become a new Russian obsession . </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>The city never sleeps. It never stops spending money… Mercer Human Resource Consulting claims Moscow is now the world's priciest city (above Tokyo, Hong Kong, London, Geneva, and New York). </li></ul>
  11. 12. <ul><li>Shops are open 24/7. Traffic is also pretty bad all night… </li></ul>
  12. 13. You go shopping not because you need something…
  13. 14. But because shopping is fun!
  14. 15. <ul><li>When you are tired, you can have a cup of cappuccino ($10) </li></ul><ul><li>in one of the fancy coffee shops. </li></ul>
  15. 16. <ul><li>And forget about saving on electricity: energy is the only thing we produce. </li></ul>
  16. 17. Traffic jams are only the half of the problem.
  17. 18. Another problem is the lack of parking space. And in Moscow you need not just a parking space, but a real shelter for you car. Otherwise…
  18. 19. Here is the solution: metal tents, so-called “shells”. Cheap, efficient and ugly…
  19. 20. And here is the reaction of the Moscow authorities… Since 2007 they removed 7.000 illegal car tents. But about 160.000 are still there…
  20. 21. Solution #2: Don’t drive a car, buy locally! 30% of all turnover in Russia comes from street retail.
  21. 22. Officially authorized…
  22. 23. And not exactly authorised…
  23. 24. You can buy knitted socks and sweaters…
  24. 25. … or flowers
  25. 26. But what’s left after the sale is over? Yes, a lot of garbage!
  26. 27. Garbage bins: A source of inspiration…
  27. 28. … and of some useful stuff!
  28. 29. Inhabitants of Moscow produce 5,5 million ton of garbage a year. Garbage removal industry is organized officially…
  29. 30. … and locally.
  30. 31. Propositions to discuss: <ul><li>1) In the socialist period public spaces were mostly used for demonstration of the ideological power. Now they are mostly used for consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>2) People need places to shop, to go out, to meet friends. In Moscow there are two types of such places: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>overpriced, shiny new ‘palaces’ of consumption (shopping malls), and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cheap non-official chaotic street markets. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3) The ‘consumerist paradise’ increases social tension (most people can’t afford it) and deforms the worldview of the young people (they believe that a cup of coffee indeed costs $10). </li></ul><ul><li>4) Street markets are messy and produce a lot of waste (they also provoke criminal activity and police corruption). </li></ul>
  31. 32. Questions to think of: <ul><li>What can designers and architects do to fill the gap between two types of public places? </li></ul><ul><li>Can we create other types of urban public spaces that have nothing to do with buying and selling? </li></ul><ul><li>How to make “buy nothing” weekends attractive again? </li></ul>

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