Future Agricultures Consortium    A Research and Policy Alliance on          African Agriculture              An Overview ...
Future Agricultures Consortium Established in 2005….   “to encourage dialogue and the sharing   of good practice by policy...
Future Agricultures ConsortiumFocus on…• Producing cutting-edge, policy relevant research at national  and regional levels...
X-cutting policy questionsAssuming that effectiveness of policy is a majordeterminant of agricultural performance…• Which ...
Partners and countries • UK: IDS, ODI, SOAS +   partners in Brazil & China • Africa: multiple partners   across the contin...
2013 and beyond• DFID accountable grant – 3 years to April 2013 –   £1.5m/yr • New funded research programmes for 2013 on ...
Our research themesResearch, analysis and debate on the political economy ofagricultural policy   1. Policy Processes   2....
Policy processesFocus                                   22% 42%• What determines which  policies and investments for  agri...
LandFocus                              22% 42%• What international and  national policy processes  influence transnational...
China and Brazil inAfrican Agriculture                       22% 42%Focus• What investments are                           ...
Commercialisations                                     22% 42%Focus• What pathways to which types  of commercialisation ar...
Social protection                                     22% 42%Focus• Can synergies be identified  between welfare-protectin...
Science, technology &innovation                          22% 42%Focus• How does the political                            1...
Climate change                                     22% 42%Focus• What are the key policy  processes, at national and      ...
Pastoralism                                 22% 42%Focus• What are the key issues  influencing the future of              ...
Young people & agri-food                                      22% 42%Focus• How is demographic change  affecting the avail...
Gender & social differenceCross-cutting all themes…• How do gender and social  difference affect how different  people in ...
Convening policy events•   Farmer First Revisited: Innovation for Agricultural    Research and Development – IDS, Dec 2007...
Communications for change‘Communications Alliance’•   Comms Coordinator (Beatrice Ouma)•   Food & Ag Convenor (Nathan Oxle...
Building capacityFAC Africa works to strengthen the capacity of juniorAfrican researchers in generating high-quality polic...
FAC early career fellowships•   International, open competition run in 2010, 2011 and    2012 – hundreds of applicants•   ...
Round 3 FAC Fellows•   Mariam Mapila, Malawi (Youth)•   Manase Chiweshe, Zimbabwe (Youth)•   Loveness Msofi, Malawi (Gende...
MA fieldwork scholarships•   Strategic partnership with the Collaborative Masters Program    in Agricultural and Applied E...
LDPI small grants•   FAC contributes to a series of small grants under the Land    Theme through the Land Deal Politics In...
FAC AfricaNew, regional, Africa-centredstructure with 4 “hubs”• East and Central Africa  Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural...
Coordination & governance•   Management team  Ephraim Chirwa (Malawi), Gem    Ardwings-Kodhek (Kenya), Ruth Hall (South A...
Thank you     Further information:    Sam Asuming-Brempong    asumbre20@hotmail.com  Future Agricultures Consortium       ...
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Future Agricultures Consortium overview (Jan 13)

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Overview of the Future Agricultures Consortium's activity, structure and approach.

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Future Agricultures Consortium overview (Jan 13)

  1. 1. Future Agricultures Consortium A Research and Policy Alliance on African Agriculture An Overview of the Consortium’s Research, Communications and Policy Engagement Activities January 2013 www.future-agricultures.org
  2. 2. Future Agricultures Consortium Established in 2005…. “to encourage dialogue and the sharing of good practice by policy makers and opinion formers in Africa on the role of agriculture in broad based growth”
  3. 3. Future Agricultures ConsortiumFocus on…• Producing cutting-edge, policy relevant research at national and regional levels to help decision-making for accelerating agricultural growth and reducing poverty• Building on solid long-term partnerships with programmes and processes related to CAADP, adding value through synergies and collaboration• Communicating evidence and facilitating access to knowledge and information through communications and networking• Investing in social science capacity and careers in an African context through a successful Early Career Fellowship programme and post-doctoral programme• Why now? Lack of focus on the political economy of agricultural policy processes
  4. 4. X-cutting policy questionsAssuming that effectiveness of policy is a majordeterminant of agricultural performance…• Which agricultural policies get implemented (in a particular country/context ) – and why?• Why might implementation of a particular policy prescription lead to very different outcomes across countries?• How does the political economy of national agricultural policy processes affect sub- national/local level processes?
  5. 5. Partners and countries • UK: IDS, ODI, SOAS + partners in Brazil & China • Africa: multiple partners across the continent with “hubs” in Accra, Cape Town and Nairobi• Western Africa: Burkina Faso, Congo-Brazzaville, Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal• Eastern Africa: Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda• Southern Africa: Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe
  6. 6. 2013 and beyond• DFID accountable grant – 3 years to April 2013 – £1.5m/yr • New funded research programmes for 2013 on Land and Commercialisation, Brazil and China in Africa • New regional, Africa-centred structure based on 3 Africa-based hubs with 1 European hub • Major conference on political economy of agricultural policy in Africa, March 2013 • Strengthening the capacity of young researchers • Extending research activities into West Africa  both francophone + anglophone, with links across
  7. 7. Our research themesResearch, analysis and debate on the political economy ofagricultural policy 1. Policy Processes 2. Land 3. China and Brazil in African Agriculture 4. Commercialisations 5. Growth & Social Protection 6. Science, Technology & Innovation 7. Climate Change & Agriculture 8. Pastoralism 9. Young People & Agri-Food Systems 10. Gender and Social Difference
  8. 8. Policy processesFocus 22% 42%• What determines which policies and investments for agricultural development are 17% 12% ‘politically feasible’ in different contexts?• How might political economy factors influence how donors can engage most usefully in agricultural policy?• How might political economy factors influence the outcome of CAADP processes?• How do political economy factors constrain/support the policy options to promote smallholder commercialisation?
  9. 9. LandFocus 22% 42%• What international and national policy processes influence transnational 12% 17% commercial land deals in Africa?• What competing discourses, interests and power relations define struggles over transnational land deals in different places?• Who wins and who loses from such land deals, in terms of gender, class, ethnicity?• What are the impacts of different kinds of land deals?
  10. 10. China and Brazil inAfrican Agriculture 22% 42%Focus• What investments are 17% Brazil and China making in 12% agricultural production in Africa?• What visions and models underpin Brazil and China cooperation programmes?• How do Brazil and China’s visions and models compare with one another and with traditional donors’ approaches to development?• What are the implications for traditional donors and for pro-poor development in Africa?
  11. 11. Commercialisations 22% 42%Focus• What pathways to which types of commercialisation are open 17% to smallholder producers? 12%• What market and institutional innovation in supply chains might help smallholder producers?• How do labour markets and institutions affect agricultural growth and poverty reduction?• How can coordination failures in finance, input and output supply be remedied?• How can agri-business be developed and regulated?
  12. 12. Social protection 22% 42%Focus• Can synergies be identified between welfare-protecting 12% 17% and growth-promoting social protection and agricultural policies?• Are there combinations of growth and social protection strategies and instruments that can promote both agricultural and non-agricultural growth and social protection?• What does ‘graduation’ mean in such intrinsically vulnerable and unpredictable livelihood contexts?
  13. 13. Science, technology &innovation 22% 42%Focus• How does the political 17% 12% economy of innovation processes shape agricultural R&D in different settings?• What public and private actors and interests are influencing debates and policy decisions on Africa’s new Green Revolution agenda – and whose voices are excluded?• How can the agricultural R&D process be governed so that it works for poor African producers?
  14. 14. Climate change 22% 42%Focus• What are the key policy processes, at national and 12% 17% international levels, that shape the links between climate change and agriculture?• How are international climate change policy goals on mitigation and adaptation negotiated in the agricultural sector at the national level?• How do government adaptation and mitigation policies manifest themselves in agricultural sector strategies?
  15. 15. Pastoralism 22% 42%Focus• What are the key issues influencing the future of 12% 17% pastoralists in sub-Saharan Africa?• What mechanisms are pastoralists employing to develop and spread their own innovations?• What are the opportunities and constraints to promoting the uptake of these innovations?
  16. 16. Young people & agri-food 22% 42%Focus• How is demographic change affecting the availability of 12% 17% farmers in the future?• Is de-agrarianisation inevitable?• What are changing perceptions, expectations and aspirations among youth about the future of agriculture in different contexts?• How can agriculture across the whole value chain be made attractive as a livelihood option for rural youth in Africa?
  17. 17. Gender & social differenceCross-cutting all themes…• How do gender and social difference affect how different people in different places benefit from agricultural development?• How can stereotypes and assumptions about women and men in African agriculture be challenged?• What are the circumstances which allow structures to either open or limit access to opportunities?
  18. 18. Convening policy events• Farmer First Revisited: Innovation for Agricultural Research and Development – IDS, Dec 2007• Towards an African Green Revolution? – Salzburg, 2008• African Agricultural Policy Seminars – ODI, 2008 & 2010• Awakening Africa’s Sleeping Giant: Agricultural Development in the Guinea Savannah – SOAS, Jun 2010• Seasonality Revisited Conference – IDS, Jul 2009• University of the Bush 1 + 2 – Borana, Ethiopia, Mar 2009; Malka Bisan Adi, Kenya, Nov 2010• What Agriculture for Sustainable Development in Africa? – CEDRES, Burkina Faso, Dec 2010• Future of Pastoralism – ILRI, Ethiopia, Mar 2011• Global Land Grabbing 1 + 2 – IDS, Apr 2011; Cornell, 2012• International Conference on Young People, Farming and Food – Accra, Ghana, Mar 2012• International seminar on South-South Co-operation – Brasilia, May 2012• International Conference on the Political Economy of Agricultural Policy in Africa – Mar 2013
  19. 19. Communications for change‘Communications Alliance’• Comms Coordinator (Beatrice Ouma)• Food & Ag Convenor (Nathan Oxley)• IDS Knowledge Services• WREN Media (Susanna Thorp)• South Africa (Rebecca Pointer, PLAAS)• Communications capacity buildingFAC Publications  reachingdifferent audiences• Policy Briefs, Working Papers• Journals, Books, Reports• Electronic Bulletin• English & FrenchFAC Website  a key portal• Research• Publications• News and events• E-debates, blogs, video• 213,825 unique visitors since May 2010 (excluding associated websites) www.future-agricultures.org
  20. 20. Building capacityFAC Africa works to strengthen the capacity of juniorAfrican researchers in generating high-quality policyrelevant research and using this to influence policyprocesses: 1. Early Career Fellowships Programme 2. Fieldwork Scholarships for Masters Degrees 3. Land Deal Politics Initiative (LDPI) Small Grants
  21. 21. FAC early career fellowships• International, open competition run in 2010, 2011 and 2012 – hundreds of applicants• 27 Early Career Fellowships awarded since 2009-10 to promising post-graduate researchers in Africa and the UK• Coordinated by Gem Argwings-Khodek (Kenya)• Each Fellow is assigned one/two FAC Mentors to support and supervise research and writing• Each Fellow expected to build on own research or link to a specific FAC theme
  22. 22. Round 3 FAC Fellows• Mariam Mapila, Malawi (Youth)• Manase Chiweshe, Zimbabwe (Youth)• Loveness Msofi, Malawi (Gender)• Akwen Sah, Cameroon (Gender)• Trust Kasambala, Malawi (Science, Technology & Innovation)• Laura Silici, Italy (Commercialisation)• Jane Chege, Kenya (Commercialisation)• Denboy Kudejira, Zimbabwe (Climate)• Eunice Githae, Kenya (Climate)• Fayera Simi, Ethiopia (Growth & Social Protection)• Miguel Loureiro, Portugal (Policy Processes)• Yassin Terragi, Ethiopia (Land)• Yared Lemma, Ethiopia (Pastoralism)• Gutu Wayessa, Ethiopia (Pastoralism)
  23. 23. MA fieldwork scholarships• Strategic partnership with the Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics (CMAAE) – CMAAE involves 16 universities in 12 countries in East and Southern Africa (Secretariat based in Nairobi) – Students pursue MAs in Agriculture and Rural Devt; Ag Policy and Trade; Agribusiness Mgt; Environment & Natural Resource Mgt – FAC scholarship recipients receive £1500-£2000 awards – Selection and supervision is by CMAAE & home universities – Expectation is that each recipient will produce a summary of their fieldwork that can become a FAC Research / Policy Brief• Additional scholarships provided directly by FAC partners in African universities
  24. 24. LDPI small grants• FAC contributes to a series of small grants under the Land Theme through the Land Deal Politics Initiative• Small grants of c. £2000 are provided to researchers in Africa (and elsewhere)• Focus is on the political economy, political ecology and political sociology of land deals centred on food, biofuels, minerals and conservation• 20 small grants awarded in 2010-11• 21 grants awarded in 2011-12
  25. 25. FAC AfricaNew, regional, Africa-centredstructure with 4 “hubs”• East and Central Africa Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development, Egerton University, Kenya• Southern Africa Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies, University of the Western Cape, South Africa• West Africa Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research, University of Ghana• Europe Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK
  26. 26. Coordination & governance• Management team  Ephraim Chirwa (Malawi), Gem Ardwings-Kodhek (Kenya), Ruth Hall (South Africa), Sam Asuming Brempong (Ghana), John Thompson (UK) and Beatrice Ouma (Kenya)• Africa “hubs” are related to the major regional economic communities in Africa (COMESA, ECOWAS and SADC). Hubs are located in leading, university-based, policy research institutions• Over 90 researchers in 15 countries in Africa  working with partners in the UK, Brazil and China• CAADP Engagement  CAADP Coordinator (Sam Asuming Brempong) + Consultant (Kate Wellard Dyer)• Gender and Social Difference  cross-cutting focus (Christine Okali)
  27. 27. Thank you Further information: Sam Asuming-Brempong asumbre20@hotmail.com Future Agricultures Consortium c/o ISSER University of Ghana P.O. Box LG 74 Legon, Ghana Tel: (233-21)512502 (233-21)512503 www.future-agricultures.org

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