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 The	
  Future	
  of	
  Privacy	
  	
  
	
  Insights	
  from	
  Discussions	
  Building	
  on	
  an	
  Ini4al	
  Perspec4v...
Context	
  
The	
  ini4al	
  perspec4ve	
  on	
  the	
  Future	
  of	
  Privacy	
  kicked	
  off	
  the	
  	
  
Future	
  A...
Knowing	
  The	
  Unknown	
  
By	
  2020	
  people	
  and	
  connected	
  objects	
  will	
  generate	
  40	
  trillion	
 ...
Value	
  of	
  Data	
  
There	
  is	
  undoubtedly	
  a	
  huge	
  economic	
  incen4ve	
  to	
  generate	
  and	
  collec...
Privacy	
  is	
  a	
  Public	
  Issue	
  
The	
  public’s	
  percep4on	
  of	
  the	
  threats	
  to	
  privacy,	
  person...
Growing	
  Distrust	
  
Growing	
  awareness	
  and	
  distrust	
  will	
  increasingly	
  become	
  a	
  factor	
  in	
  ...
Digital	
  Commons	
  
The	
  ‘digital	
  commons’	
  will	
  con4nue	
  to	
  grow,	
  empowering	
  more	
  and	
  more	...
Individual	
  Control	
  
New	
  disrup4ve	
  providers	
  are	
  seeking	
  to	
  put	
  the	
  individual	
  in	
  contr...
Stronger	
  RegulaDon	
  
Regula4on	
  will	
  get	
  tougher:	
  Policy	
  makers	
  will	
  act	
  to	
  toughen	
  	
  ...
Personally	
  Curated	
  Data	
  
‘Personally	
  curated’	
  sources	
  of	
  data	
  will	
  have	
  higher	
  value	
  s...
Privacy	
  Visibility	
  
The	
  security	
  industry	
  has	
  been	
  es4mated	
  to	
  be	
  worth	
  $350	
  Billion	
...
ShiEing	
  Power	
  To	
  The	
  Individual	
  
This	
  poten4al	
  for	
  economic	
  disrup4on	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  th...
Data	
  Ethics	
  and	
  Trust	
  
As	
  trust	
  increasingly	
  drives	
  success,	
  organisa4ons	
  will	
  seek	
  to...
Linkability	
  of	
  Open	
  Data	
  
No	
  data	
  will	
  be	
  truly	
  anonymous:	
  Current	
  open	
  data	
  prac4c...
Global	
  vs.	
  Local	
  
Technology	
  is	
  by	
  its	
  very	
  nature	
  global	
  and	
  data	
  does	
  not	
  resp...
Technology	
  to	
  the	
  Rescue	
  
The	
  machines	
  will	
  help	
  us	
  manage	
  our	
  privacy:	
  Technology	
  ...
Privacy	
  as	
  CompeDDon	
  
Privacy	
  is	
  not	
  about	
  the	
  individual	
  –	
  it	
  is	
  all	
  about	
  the	...
Data	
  Risk	
  Management	
  
As	
  privacy	
  and	
  data	
  are	
  subsumed	
  within	
  wider	
  risk	
  frameworks,	
...
I,	
  Robot	
  
We	
  will	
  see	
  urgent	
  debate	
  on	
  the	
  accountability	
  and	
  ethicacy	
  of	
  machines	...
Privacy	
  EducaDon	
  Race	
  
Programmes	
  of	
  ‘privacy	
  educa4on’	
  emerge	
  to	
  combat	
  mass-­‐desensi4sa4o...
Privacy	
  Crimes:	
  Data	
  Hostages	
  
Criminals	
  have	
  always	
  invaded	
  privacy,	
  but	
  new	
  threats	
  ...
The	
  Many	
  Faces	
  of	
  Privacy	
  
Different	
  interpreta4ons	
  of	
  privacy,	
  many	
  from	
  different	
  cult...
Privacy	
  Rights	
  
We	
  see	
  more	
  robust	
  privacy	
  rights	
  beZer	
  suited	
  to	
  the	
  digital	
  age.	...
Paying	
  for	
  Privacy	
  	
  
We	
  do	
  not	
  currently	
  understand	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  our	
  data	
  or	
  ...
To	
  Have	
  and	
  To	
  Hold	
  
Porous	
  access	
  controls	
  and	
  the	
  risk	
  of	
  future	
  liabili4es	
  hi...
Sharing	
  Secrets	
  
In	
  exchange	
  for	
  beZer	
  service	
  or	
  an	
  improved	
  quality	
  of	
  life,	
  	
  ...
The	
  Privacy	
  Illusion	
  
There	
  is	
  a	
  rising	
  general	
  belief	
  in	
  the	
  right	
  to	
  data	
  priv...
Privacy	
  Agents	
  
The	
  difficul4es	
  in	
  extrac4ng	
  value	
  from	
  our	
  data	
  while	
  protec4ng	
  our	
  ...
Rising	
  Cyber	
  Security	
  
Greater	
  interconnec4vity	
  and	
  the	
  Internet	
  of	
  Things	
  creates	
  new	
 ...
Global	
  Privacy	
  Treaty	
  
As	
  different	
  regions	
  all	
  seek	
  to	
  progress	
  data	
  regula4on	
  via	
  ...
Under	
  the	
  Skin	
  
As	
  wearables	
  and	
  implants	
  become	
  commonplace	
  and	
  workforces	
  are	
  
freel...
Data	
  and	
  Democracy	
  
Many	
  ques4on	
  whether	
  privacy	
  will	
  enable	
  the	
  democra4c	
  process:	
  Is...
Privacy	
  as	
  a	
  Luxury	
  
The	
  right	
  to	
  privacy	
  becomes	
  more	
  difficult	
  to	
  enforce,	
  but	
  t...
Informed	
  Consent	
  
Given	
  complex	
  data	
  flows,	
  informed	
  consent	
  is	
  increasingly	
  challenging	
  –...
Future	
  Agenda	
  
84	
  Brook	
  Street	
  
London	
  
W1K	
  5EH	
  
+44	
  203	
  0088	
  141	
  
futureagenda.org	
 ...
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Future of privacy - Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by Stephen Deadman, Vodafone

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The initial perspective on the Future of Privacy kicked off the Future Agenda 2.0 global discussions taking place through 2015. This summary builds on the initial view and is updated as we progress the futureagenda2.0 programme. www.futureagenda.org

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Future of privacy - Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by Stephen Deadman, Vodafone

  1. 1.  The  Future  of  Privacy      Insights  from  Discussions  Building  on  an  Ini4al  Perspec4ve  by:    Stephen  Deadman  |  Group  Privacy  Officer  |  Vodafone  Group  plc  
  2. 2. Context   The  ini4al  perspec4ve  on  the  Future  of  Privacy  kicked  off  the     Future  Agenda  2.0  global  discussions  taking  place  through  2015.     This  summary  builds  on  the  ini4al  view  and  is  updated  as  we  progress   Ini4al   Perspec4ves   Q4  2014   Global   Discussions   Q1/2  2015   Insight   Synthesis   Q3  2015   Sharing     Output   Q4  2015  
  3. 3. Knowing  The  Unknown   By  2020  people  and  connected  objects  will  generate  40  trillion  gigabytes  of   data  that  will  have  an  impact  on  daily  life  in  one  way  or  another.  This  data  will   make  known  about  us  things  that  were  previously  unknown  or  unknowable.  
  4. 4. Value  of  Data   There  is  undoubtedly  a  huge  economic  incen4ve  to  generate  and  collect  data   from  whatever  sources  it  becomes  available.  As  more  data  from  more  things   becomes  available,  we  can  expect  to  see  a  data  “land  grab”  by  organisa4ons.    
  5. 5. Privacy  is  a  Public  Issue   The  public’s  percep4on  of  the  threats  to  privacy,  personal  freedom     and  autonomy  is  growing.  Privacy  has  already  emerged  beyond  a     niche,  specialist  concern  to  being  a  mainstream  public  issue.    
  6. 6. Growing  Distrust   Growing  awareness  and  distrust  will  increasingly  become  a  factor  in     decision  making  for  ordinary  people  –  decisions  about  the  products  we  use     or  abandon,  the  brands  we  associate  with,  the  poli4cal  leaders  we  elect.  
  7. 7. Digital  Commons   The  ‘digital  commons’  will  con4nue  to  grow,  empowering  more  and  more   ci4zens  and  consumers  to  take  maZers  into  their  own  hands,  such  as  deploying   end-­‐to-­‐end  encryp4on,  anonymizers  and  by  “watching  the  watchers”.      
  8. 8. Individual  Control   New  disrup4ve  providers  are  seeking  to  put  the  individual  in  control  of     their  personal  data.  In  the  process,  they  are  seeking  to  dis-­‐intermediate     data-­‐intensive  businesses  from  their  exis4ng  sources  of  data.    
  9. 9. Stronger  RegulaDon   Regula4on  will  get  tougher:  Policy  makers  will  act  to  toughen     laws,  even  though  they  move  at  geological  speeds     compared  to  the  rate  of  technology  development.  
  10. 10. Personally  Curated  Data   ‘Personally  curated’  sources  of  data  will  have  higher  value  simply  due  to  the   fact  that  they  will  represent  the  actual  wishes  and  desires  of  an  individual,   rather  than  the  presumed  wishes  and  desires  based  on  derived  data.    
  11. 11. Privacy  Visibility   The  security  industry  has  been  es4mated  to  be  worth  $350  Billion  in     the  US  alone;  security  is  a  sophis4cated  and  maturing  market.     The  ‘privacy  industry’  by  contrast  is  hardly  recognizable  at  all.    
  12. 12. ShiEing  Power  To  The  Individual   This  poten4al  for  economic  disrup4on  to  come  to  the  aid  of  privacy     by  shiaing  power  over  data  from  the  organisa4on  to  the   individual  is  one  of  the  most  significant  emerging  trends.  
  13. 13. Data  Ethics  and  Trust   As  trust  increasingly  drives  success,  organisa4ons  will  seek  to  make  data  ethics   a  focus.  In  order  to  engage  and  gain  buy-­‐in  from  governments  and  consumers   alike,  trust  in  data  usage  will  become  a  core  placorm  for  differen4a4on.  
  14. 14. Linkability  of  Open  Data   No  data  will  be  truly  anonymous:  Current  open  data  prac4ce  assumes  that   technology  will  be  not  be  able  to  relink  it  to  its  source.  This  is  not  the    case  and  so,  by  2025,  we  will  see  different  levels  of  de-­‐iden4fica4on.    
  15. 15. Global  vs.  Local   Technology  is  by  its  very  nature  global  and  data  does  not  respect  na4onal   boundaries.  Can  na4on  states  con4nue  to  set  the  rules  or  will  tension  in  global   interoperability  drive  us  to  design  for  global  standards  but  with  localised  use?  
  16. 16. Technology  to  the  Rescue   The  machines  will  help  us  manage  our  privacy:  Technology  will     enable  people  to  protect  themselves  and  killer  apps  will  let  people     collect  and  share  their  data  for  the  ‘public  good’.  
  17. 17. Privacy  as  CompeDDon   Privacy  is  not  about  the  individual  –  it  is  all  about  the  value  of  data.     Therefore  we  will  see  increasing  data  fragmenta4on  as  companies  seek     to  use  data  for  compe44ve  advantage  and  create  new  barriers  to  entry.  
  18. 18. Data  Risk  Management   As  privacy  and  data  are  subsumed  within  wider  risk  frameworks,     greater  self-­‐regula4on  and  more  in-­‐house  data  risk  management  will    lead  to  deeper  integra4on  of  engineering,  privacy  and  policy.  
  19. 19. I,  Robot   We  will  see  urgent  debate  on  the  accountability  and  ethicacy  of  machines  and   systems  making  autonomous  decisions,  using  our  data.  Solu4ons  will  have   profound  implica4ons  for  the  development  of  data-­‐driven  technologies.  
  20. 20. Privacy  EducaDon  Race   Programmes  of  ‘privacy  educa4on’  emerge  to  combat  mass-­‐desensi4sa4on  to   the  sharing  of  private  data.  However  this  will  not  prevent  ‘privacy  coronaries’    –  the  result  of  returning  to  bad  habits  aaer  privacy  viola4ons.  
  21. 21. Privacy  Crimes:  Data  Hostages   Criminals  have  always  invaded  privacy,  but  new  threats  emerge  as  our  digital   selves  increasingly  become  poten4ally  valuable  hostages.  Stronger  privacy   rights  will  need  to  be  backed  by  knowledge  of  where  we  are  most  vulnerable.  
  22. 22. The  Many  Faces  of  Privacy   Different  interpreta4ons  of  privacy,  many  from  different  cultures,  challenge   exis4ng  models.  Global  frameworks  may  become  more  consistent  while   implementa4ons  are  localised  and  diverse,  making  'privacy  borders'  a  reality.  
  23. 23. Privacy  Rights   We  see  more  robust  privacy  rights  beZer  suited  to  the  digital  age.  These  may   include  rights  to  anonymity  and  personal  data  ownership,  but  also  innova4ve   rights  to  ‘digital  self-­‐determina4on’  or  ‘the  right  to  change  our  minds’.  
  24. 24. Paying  for  Privacy     We  do  not  currently  understand  the  value  of  our  data  or  how  it  is     being  used  and  so  are  giving  it  away.  In  the  future  we  might  be  willing     to  pay  more  for  our  privacy  than  the  data  we  share.    
  25. 25. To  Have  and  To  Hold   Porous  access  controls  and  the  risk  of  future  liabili4es  highlight  to     many  that  there  is  benefit  in  destroying  data  that  is  not  needed     –  especially  HR,  customer  and  pricing  informa4on.  
  26. 26. Sharing  Secrets   In  exchange  for  beZer  service  or  an  improved  quality  of  life,     we  increasingly  recognise  exactly  what  personal  informa4on     we  are  prepared  to  share  and  who  to  share  it  with.  
  27. 27. The  Privacy  Illusion   There  is  a  rising  general  belief  in  the  right  to  data  privacy  and  the  right     to  data  security.  Both  are  illusions:  Security  is  impossible  without     increased  monitoring  -­‐  and  so  true  privacy  is  also  impossible.  
  28. 28. Privacy  Agents   The  difficul4es  in  extrac4ng  value  from  our  data  while  protec4ng  our  privacy   sees  the  emergence  of  new  professions.  Look  out  for  ‘privacy  agents’  and     ‘data  brokers’  ac4ng  as  intermediaries  and  managing  the  flow  of  our  data.  
  29. 29. Rising  Cyber  Security   Greater  interconnec4vity  and  the  Internet  of  Things  creates  new     vulnerabili4es  for  governments  and  corpora4ons  -­‐  as  the  unscrupulous  and     the  criminal  increasingly  seek  to  exploit  weakness  and  destroy  systems.  
  30. 30. Global  Privacy  Treaty   As  different  regions  all  seek  to  progress  data  regula4on  via  the  likes  of  APEC   and  the  EU,  the  emergence  of  a  global  privacy  framework  is  championed  by   those  looking  for  control  and  transparency:  A  Geneva  Conven4on  for  privacy?  
  31. 31. Under  the  Skin   As  wearables  and  implants  become  commonplace  and  workforces  are   freelance  and  porcolio-­‐based,  the  ability  of  organisa4ons  to  own  or  control   corporate  informa4on  held  on  personal  devices  is  significantly  diminished.    
  32. 32. Data  and  Democracy   Many  ques4on  whether  privacy  will  enable  the  democra4c  process:  Is  there   privacy  without  democracy?  Ci4zen  data  is  increasingly  publicly  used  and   shared  by  governments  as  an  instrument  of  social  change.  
  33. 33. Privacy  as  a  Luxury   The  right  to  privacy  becomes  more  difficult  to  enforce,  but  the  wealthy   con4nue  to  take  ac4on  when  informa4on  is  misused.  Privacy  could  be  a  luxury   in  the  near  term  –  but  may  become  more  widely  available  in  the  longer  term.  
  34. 34. Informed  Consent   Given  complex  data  flows,  informed  consent  is  increasingly  challenging  –     so  an  alterna4ve  is  needed:  An  accountability  governance  model  incorpora4ng   ethics  and  respeccul  data  use  is  a  compelling  subs4tute  or  complement.  
  35. 35. Future  Agenda   84  Brook  Street   London   W1K  5EH   +44  203  0088  141   futureagenda.org   The  world’s  leading  open  foresight  program   What  do  you  think?   Join  In  |  Add  your  views  into  the  mix     www.futureagenda.org  

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