Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Future of data - Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and Co-Founder, YouGov

3,493 views

Published on

The initial perspective on the Future of Data kicked off the Future Agenda 2.0 global discussions taking place through 2015. This summary builds on the initial view and is updated as we progress the futureagenda2.0 programme. www.futureagenda.org

Published in: Data & Analytics
  • Be the first to comment

Future of data - Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and Co-Founder, YouGov

  1. 1.  The  Future  of  Data      Insights  from  Discussions  Building  on  an  Ini4al  Perspec4ve  by:    Stephan  Shakespeare  |  CEO  and  Co-­‐Founder  |  YouGov  
  2. 2. Context   The  ini4al  perspec4ve  on  the  Future  of  Data  kicked  off  the     Future  Agenda  2.0  global  discussions  taking  place  through  2015.     This  summary  builds  on  the  ini4al  view  and  is  updated  as  we  progress.   Ini4al   Perspec4ves   Q4  2014   Global   Discussions   Q1/2  2015   Insight   Synthesis   Q3  2015   Sharing     Output   Q4  2015  
  3. 3. Data  Inequali4es   All  levels  of  society  should  benefit  from  the  informa4on  data  crunching  can   deliver.  But  just  because  the  capability  is  there,  it  is  not  a  guarantee  that  it  will   be  shared  unilaterally.  This  is  an  area  where  new  inequali4es  could  grow.  
  4. 4. Global  Village   Years  ago  we  lived  in  small  communi4es,  our  doors  were  unlocked  and     our  neighbours  knew  our  every  move.    It  was  considered  normal.     Our  community  is  now  global  but  the  principal  remains  the  same.  
  5. 5. Shared  Informa4on   There  isn’t  much  informa4on  that  we  can  easily  say  belongs  to  just  one     person.  AXer  all  if  two  people  have  a  chat  in  a  café  the  content  belongs  to     both  of  them  and  the  fact  of  their  mee4ng  belongs  to  all  who  observe  it.    
  6. 6. Agreed  Principles   Data  is  useful  to  everyone  so  we  must  get  used  to  sharing.  The  challenge  is  to   develop  our  ethical  and  legal  apparatus  for  this,  establishing  a  set  of  agreed   principles  and  regulatory  framework  that  can  act  as  the  basis.  
  7. 7. Data  Protec4on   Protec4on  against  hackers  remains  weak  with  security  soXware  con4nuously   behind  the  curve.  Wider  concerns  have  been  raised  by  mass  surveillance  and  a   growing  number  of  countries  now  see  cyber  space  as  a  new  stage  for  ba[le.  
  8. 8. Connected  Data   Data  must  be  connected  and  mul4  layered  to  be  relevant.     It  is  not  big  data  but  rather  connected  data  –  the  confluence     of  big  data  and  structured  data  that  ma[ers.      
  9. 9. Public  Data    More  connected,  open  data  plays  a  more  significant  role  that  benefits  na4onal   economies  and  their  ci4zens,  as  well  as  private  commerce.  Improved  analysis   and  partnerships  provide  the  public  sector  with  a  new  world  of  performance.    
  10. 10. Data  Exploita4on   If  it  is  discovered  that  companies  exploit  data  that  has  been  collected  without   genuine  permission  and  use  it  in  ways  that  have  no  societal  benefit  there  is  a   risk  that  a  nega4ve  public  response  will  limit  opportuni4es  for  everyone.  
  11. 11. Agreement  on  Use  Not  Collec4on   The  best  approach  to  future  proof  access  to  big  data  is  to  ensure  there  is   agreement  around  its  use,  not  its  collec4on.  We  need  a  core  reference  dataset   to  iden4fy  the  data  that  is  most  effec4ve  in  driving  social  and  economic  gain.    
  12. 12. Living  in  Glass  Houses   If  we  get  it  right,  we  will  be  more  comfortable  to  metaphorically  ‘live  in  a  glass   house’,  allowing  our  personal  informa4on  to  be  widely  accessible  in  return  for   the  understanding  that  this  enables  a  richer,  more  ‘a[uned’  life  as  a  result.  
  13. 13. Data  Darwinism     Data  is  a  new  form  of  power:  Corporate  consolida4on  places  data  in  the     hands  of  a  few  who  are  able  to  dictate  terms  above  others.  Governments   correspondingly  have  less  power  as  they  have  less  access  to  key  data.  
  14. 14. A  Data  Marketplace     Data  is  a  currency,  it  has  a  value  and  a  price,  and  therefore  requires  a     market  place.  An  ecosystem  for  trading  data  is  emerging  and  anything     that  is  informa4on  is  represented  in  a  new  data  marketplace.    
  15. 15. The  Data  Learning  Gap     Different  talent  gaps  emerge  as  educa4on  con4nues  to  struggle  to  keep  up   with  changing  data  skills  requirements.  Commercial  companies  increasingly   invest  in  their  own  people’s  data  management  skills  to  be  in  the  pack.    
  16. 16. The  Rise  of  Machines     The  growth  in  the  intelligence  and  capabili4es  of  machines  presents  both  a   threat  and  an  opportunity:  Greater  AI  and  automa4on  free  up  4me,  but  also   threaten  jobs  -­‐  both  low  skilled  and  managerial  /  administra4ve  roles.      
  17. 17. Seamless  Data  Representa4on     Improvements  in  the  way  in  which  data  is  visualized  and  presented  leads  to   rising  consump4on  and  wider  use.  In  turn,  we  see  greater  efficiencies  and   benefits  for  individuals,  companies,  governments  and  society  as  a  whole.    
  18. 18. Data/Human  Teaming   Faster  and  more  convenient  access  to  raw  and  sophis4cated  data  analysis,   through  mobile  and  wearable  technologies,  means  that  data-­‐enabled  decision   making  will  increasingly  become  the  norm  for  consumers  and  ci4zens.  
  19. 19. Data  Impurity   As  more  decisions  are  made  with  reference  to  Big  Data  analysis  -­‐  the  ques4on   of  if  data  is  well  collected,  or  manipulated,  will  become  more  important.  ‘Data   standards’  will  emerge  to  cope  with  growing  complexity  of  merging  data  sets.  
  20. 20. Data-­‐conscious  Ci4zens     The  need  for  ci4zens  to  understand  how  data  is  used  will  grow.  Educa4on  will   be  needed  to  combat  new  inequali4es,  and  enable  people  to  fully  take  part  in   society:  understanding  data  will  become  part  of  civic  self-­‐consciousness.  
  21. 21. Securing  Sustainable  Society   The  benefits  of  making  data  open,  especially  for  solving  some  of  society’s   greatest  problems,  will  drive  governments  to  insist  that  certain  private  data   sets  are  made  public,  democra4sing  data-­‐use  and  driving  social  innova4on.    
  22. 22. Quan4fied  Value     The  power  of  data  is  in  the  hands  of  those  who  are  able  to  organise  it.     But  who  will  be  able  to  define  what  is  fully  accurate  and  true     informa4on  before  it  can  be  quan4fied  and  therefore  have  value?      
  23. 23. Paying  for  Privacy     We  do  not  currently  understand  the  value  of  our  data  or  how  it  is     being  used  and  so  are  giving  it  away.  In  the  future  we  might  be  willing     to  pay  more  for  our  privacy  than  the  data  we  share.    
  24. 24. Crowd  Truthing     Such  is  the  influence  of  the  rising  data  swirl  that  “truth”  may  well     become  what  the  online  crowds  agree  to:  We  see  a  world  where   ‘crowd  truth  verifica4on’  is  priori4sed  over  search  and  media.  
  25. 25. Masters  of  Our  Data   In  2025  there  will  be  a  seamless  border  between  digital  and  real  where    the  digital  truth  becomes  the  real  truth.  We  should  increase  awareness     of  our  digital  shadow  becoming  ‘masters  of  our  data’.  
  26. 26. Data  Readiness   At  both  an  infrastructure  and  educa4onal  level  some  countries  are  be[er   preparing  their  towns  and  ci4zens  for  a  data-­‐focused  world.  Gigabit   connec4vity  and  business-­‐ready  curricula  help  to  give  some  an  edge.  
  27. 27. Enhanced  People   A  more  data  aware  and  connected  society  makes  be[er  use  of  informa4on  to   provide  targeted  benefits  to  a  broader  popula4on.  By  2025  over  10%  of  the   global  popula4on  will  be  physically  and  mentally  healthier  and  will  live  longer.  
  28. 28. Data  Islands   Some  economies  seek  to  maintain  closed  or  parallel  networks,  independent  of   global  systems.  Different  approaches  from  the  standard  are  developed  for   major  popula4on  centres  and,  in  4me,  could  have  global  reach.  
  29. 29. Influencing  Behaviour   As  our  knowledge  of  working  with  and  applying  data  improves,  a  rise  in  its   ar4s4c  use  emerges:  Informa4on  is  more  widely  adopted  and  adapted  in   culture  and,  in  some  areas,  used  to  s4mulate  behavioural  change.  
  30. 30. Deeper  vs.  Wider  Rela4onships   Social  interac4ons  broaden  through  extended  access  but  may  also     become  more  superficial:  A  divide  grows  between  those  establishing   rela4onships  purely  on  data  and  those  basing  connec4ons  on  emo4ons.  
  31. 31. Broader  Cyber  Terrorism   Cyber  a[acks  move  from  the  virtual  world  to  the  physical  -­‐  a[acking  planes,     u4li4es  and  industrial  systems.  Some  see  a  corresponding  slow  down  in     the  adop4on  of  sensors  and  wider  use  of  private  encryp4on  technologies.    
  32. 32. Smarter  Sensor  Systems   Ubiquitous,  miniaturised,  intelligent  systems,  built  around  common  standards,   enable  an  affordable,  pervasive  and  connected  world.  This  leads  to  improved   security,  greater  personalisa4on  and  the  ‘massifica4on’  of  data.    
  33. 33. Ci4zen-­‐centric  Data     Some  see  the  inevitability  of  a  ci4zen-­‐centric  data  eco-­‐system  that  empowers   individuals  with  control  and  visibility  over  all  data  created  by,  or  impac4ng  on,   them,  including  data  aXer  life  –  the  onward  usage  of  inherited  data.  
  34. 34. The  Third  Space  for  Data     By  2025,  a  new  place  for  data  emerges  -­‐  between  public  and  private.  This  is   driven  by  "data  philanthropy"  and  the  dona4on  of  data  for  social  purposes   such  as  healthcare  and  improving  our  ability  to  respond  to  disasters.  
  35. 35. Soulless  Systems     Data  is  not  enough  on  its  own  and  in  the  future  there  will  be  more     recogni4on  of  humans  and  their  cogni4ve  abili4es:  Analysis  must  strike  a   balance  between  func4onal  versus  emo4onal  and  human  versus  data.  
  36. 36. Crypto-­‐Anarchists     Considera4on  is  increasingly  given  to  empowering  totalitarianism  through   surveillance  to  help  deal  with  crypto-­‐anarchists.  Totalitarian  surveillance  is   seen  as  par4cularly  necessary  as  emerging  economies  drive  rapid  change.  
  37. 37. Data  Criminality     Data  becomes  the  currency  of  criminal  opportunity  -­‐  which  supports,  feeds  and   innovates  opera4ons  such  as  human  trafficking,  fraud,  counterfeit,  drugs,   pros4tu4on,  and  paedophilia  –  thus  blurring  the  vision  of  an  open  data  utopia.  
  38. 38. Future  Agenda   84  Brook  Street   London   W1K  5EH   +44  203  0088  141   futureagenda.org   The  world’s  leading  open  foresight  program   What  do  you  think?   Join  In  |  Add  your  views  into  the  mix     www.futureagenda.org  

×