Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
 The	
  Future	
  of	
  Ci-es	
  	
  
	
  Insights	
  from	
  Discussions	
  Building	
  on	
  an	
  Ini4al	
  Perspec4ve	...
Context	
  
The	
  ini4al	
  perspec4ve	
  on	
  the	
  Future	
  of	
  Ci4es	
  kicked	
  off	
  the	
  	
  
Future	
  Age...
Mass	
  Urbanisa-on	
  
By	
  2050	
  over	
  70%	
  of	
  people	
  will	
  live	
  in	
  a	
  city.	
  The	
  growth	
  ...
Consuming	
  Ci-es	
  	
  
Ci4es	
  consume	
  75%	
  of	
  the	
  world’s	
  natural	
  resources,	
  and	
  produce	
  m...
Floa-ng	
  Ci-es?	
  
Climate	
  change	
  poses	
  a	
  worrying	
  challenge	
  for	
  ci4es.	
  Already	
  50%	
  of	
 ...
Adap-ng	
  for	
  Ageing	
  Popula-ons	
  	
  
In	
  developed	
  countries,	
  80%	
  of	
  older	
  people	
  will	
  li...
Crea-ve	
  Hubs	
  	
  
Ci4es	
  have	
  a	
  long	
  history	
  of	
  fostering	
  social	
  and	
  prac4cal	
  innova4on...
Living	
  Ci-es	
  	
  
As	
  technology	
  becomes	
  more	
  sophis4cated,	
  new	
  approaches	
  create	
  place-­‐
ba...
Digital	
  Engagement	
  	
  
Ci4es	
  are	
  using	
  digital	
  pla`orms	
  to	
  beaer	
  plan	
  for	
  the	
  future	...
New	
  Models	
  and	
  Measures	
  
We	
  need	
  measures	
  to	
  help	
  technology	
  to	
  play	
  a	
  role	
  acro...
People-­‐Powered	
  Planning	
  	
  
In	
  an	
  era	
  where	
  the	
  public	
  voice	
  is	
  easier	
  to	
  access	
 ...
Las-ng	
  Design	
  	
  
We	
  need	
  a	
  shid	
  toward	
  a	
  circular	
  economy	
  that	
  is	
  restora4ve,	
  bot...
Valuing	
  Crea-vity	
  	
  
Ci4es	
  need	
  to	
  increasingly	
  embrace	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  crea4vity	
  as	
  	
...
Healthy	
  Ci-es	
  	
  
New	
  approaches	
  to	
  city	
  design	
  will	
  gain	
  by	
  encouraging	
  healthier	
  ur...
Coopera-on	
  Across	
  Boundaries	
  
Ci4es	
  need	
  more	
  joined-­‐up	
  coopera4ve	
  government	
  working,	
  acr...
Public-­‐Private	
  City	
  Partnerships	
  
To	
  collec4vely	
  address	
  major	
  urban	
  challenges,	
  as	
  shown	...
Safe	
  Ci-es	
  	
  
Urban	
  dwellers	
  expect	
  their	
  ci4es	
  to	
  be	
  secure,	
  leading	
  to	
  increased	
...
Ci-es	
  as	
  Products	
  
People-­‐orientated	
  transforma4on	
  means	
  that	
  ci4zens	
  are	
  seen	
  as	
  the	
...
In	
  Need	
  of	
  Belonging	
  	
  
Small	
  communi4es	
  exist	
  in	
  mega	
  ci4es	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  sense	
...
Pop-­‐up	
  Economies	
  	
  
Crowd-­‐sourcing	
  will	
  enable	
  ‘pop-­‐up	
  economies’	
  where	
  communi4es	
  pool...
Infrastructure	
  Responsibility	
  
What	
  happens	
  when	
  the	
  city	
  becomes	
  so	
  transient	
  that	
  no	
 ...
Hub-­‐hop	
  
For	
  some,	
  na4onal	
  iden4ty	
  is	
  on	
  the	
  decline.	
  Look	
  out	
  for	
  the	
  rise	
  of...
Public	
  Spaces	
  	
  
Governments	
  are	
  pressured	
  to	
  ensure	
  that	
  public	
  spaces	
  are	
  created	
  ...
Satellite	
  Ci-es	
  
The	
  growth	
  of	
  satellite	
  ci4es	
  and	
  networks	
  of	
  midi-­‐ci4es	
  in	
  many	
 ...
Waste	
  Management	
  
As	
  ci4es	
  become	
  ever	
  more	
  densely	
  populated,	
  new	
  approaches	
  to	
  	
  
...
Rural	
  Upgrade	
  
Rather	
  than	
  focus	
  so	
  much	
  on	
  ci4es	
  we	
  will	
  see	
  some	
  regions	
  place...
Future	
  Agenda	
  
84	
  Brook	
  Street	
  
London	
  
W1K	
  5EH	
  
+44	
  203	
  0088	
  141	
  
futureagenda.org	
 ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Future of cities Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by an initial perspective by Harry Rich Chief Executive RIBA

3,547 views

Published on

Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by an initial perspective on the future of cities by Harry Rich Chief Executive RIBA. This includes insights from events already completed adding to the starting point for the global future agenda discussions taking place through 2015 as part of the the futureagenda2.0 programme. www.futureagenda.org

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

Future of cities Insights from Discussions Building on an Initial Perspective by an initial perspective by Harry Rich Chief Executive RIBA

  1. 1.  The  Future  of  Ci-es      Insights  from  Discussions  Building  on  an  Ini4al  Perspec4ve  by:    Harry  Rich|  Chief  Execu4ve  |  Royal  Ins4tute  of  Bri4sh  Architects  
  2. 2. Context   The  ini4al  perspec4ve  on  the  Future  of  Ci4es  kicked  off  the     Future  Agenda  2.0  global  discussions  taking  place  through  2015.     This  summary  builds  on  the  ini4al  view  and  is  updated  as  we  progress.   Ini4al   Perspec4ves   Q4  2014   Global   Discussions   Q1/2  2015   Insight   Synthesis   Q3  2015   Sharing     Output   Q4  2015  
  3. 3. Mass  Urbanisa-on   By  2050  over  70%  of  people  will  live  in  a  city.  The  growth  of  mega-­‐ci4es  is   crea4ng  a  new  wave  of  urbanisa4on.    Such  mass  urbanisa4on  requires  a   rethink  about  how  we  plan  and  design  ci4es.  
  4. 4. Consuming  Ci-es     Ci4es  consume  75%  of  the  world’s  natural  resources,  and  produce  more  than   60%  of  GHG  emissions.  As  a  result,  while  the  economic  power  of  ci4es   con4nues  to  grow,  they  remain  vulnerable  to  the  by-­‐products  of  their  success.  
  5. 5. Floa-ng  Ci-es?   Climate  change  poses  a  worrying  challenge  for  ci4es.  Already  50%  of  ci4es     are  dealing  with  its  effects,  and  nearly  all  are  at  risk.  Over  90%  of  all  urban   areas  are  coastal,  pung  most  ci4es  on  earth  at  risk  of  flooding.    
  6. 6. Adap-ng  for  Ageing  Popula-ons     In  developed  countries,  80%  of  older  people  will  live  in  ci4es  by  2050,  while   ci4es  in  developing  countries  will  house  25%  of  the  older  popula4on.  Planners   are  adap4ng  urban  environments  to  support  healthy  ageing  of  popula4ons.  
  7. 7. Crea-ve  Hubs     Ci4es  have  a  long  history  of  fostering  social  and  prac4cal  innova4on.     New  technology  has  enabled  ci4es  to  evolve  and  reinvent  themselves     in  the  face  of  huge  social,  environmental  and  technological  upheaval.  
  8. 8. Living  Ci-es     As  technology  becomes  more  sophis4cated,  new  approaches  create  place-­‐ based  design  that  addresses  the  health  and  environmental  impacts  of  ci4es,   making  more  compact  spaces  more  appealing  to  poten4al  residents.  
  9. 9. Digital  Engagement     Ci4es  are  using  digital  pla`orms  to  beaer  plan  for  the  future  and  encourage   public  engagement.  Using  new  technology  and  big  data  to  support  strategic   planning  of  a  city  can  help  improve  public  engagement  with  the  process.  
  10. 10. New  Models  and  Measures   We  need  measures  to  help  technology  to  play  a  role  across  boundaries.   Globally,  a  strong  cultural  shid  will  be  required,  moving  away  from  business  as   usual  to  models  that  enable  the  economy  to  thrive  within  resource  constraints.  
  11. 11. People-­‐Powered  Planning     In  an  era  where  the  public  voice  is  easier  to  access  and  harder  to  suppress,  it   becomes  harder  to  generate  support  for  new  ini4a4ves  without  taking  public   views  into  account.  Leaders  will  need  to  maintain  public  and  poli4cal  support.    
  12. 12. Las-ng  Design     We  need  a  shid  toward  a  circular  economy  that  is  restora4ve,  both  naturally   and  technically.  Buildings  have  to  be  built  to  an4cipate  future  change,  rather   than  using  design  standards  based  on  exis4ng  condi4ons.    
  13. 13. Valuing  Crea-vity     Ci4es  need  to  increasingly  embrace  the  value  of  crea4vity  as     both  an  agent  of  change  and  as  part  of  considering     and  providing  holis4c  processes  for  change.    
  14. 14. Healthy  Ci-es     New  approaches  to  city  design  will  gain  by  encouraging  healthier  urban   dwellers  -­‐  reduced  healthcare  costs,  increased  produc4vity,  more  community   resilience,  improved  life  expectancy  and  fewer  demands  on  health  services.  
  15. 15. Coopera-on  Across  Boundaries   Ci4es  need  more  joined-­‐up  coopera4ve  government  working,  across     systems  and  boundaries.  This  includes  a  focus  on  long-­‐term  benefits     to  society,  par4cularly  with  regard  to  planning  and  investment.  
  16. 16. Public-­‐Private  City  Partnerships   To  collec4vely  address  major  urban  challenges,  as  shown  by  Medellin  in   Colombia,  governments  increasingly  openly  collaborate  with  business  to   improve  the  ins4tu4onal  fabric  of  ci4es  as  well  as  core  infrastructure.    
  17. 17. Safe  Ci-es     Urban  dwellers  expect  their  ci4es  to  be  secure,  leading  to  increased  monitoring   of  human  behaviour  and  surveillance  to  improve  the  sense  of  physical  security   but  at  the  cost  of  increased  fears  over  personal  data  and  privacy  breaches.    
  18. 18. Ci-es  as  Products   People-­‐orientated  transforma4on  means  that  ci4zens  are  seen  as  the  most   essen4al  stakeholder  for  urban  development  -­‐  providing  enhanced  quality  of   life  in  ci4es  through  greater  comfort,  sa4sfac4on  and  sense  of  belonging.  
  19. 19. In  Need  of  Belonging     Small  communi4es  exist  in  mega  ci4es  to  provide  a  sense  of  community     and  social  wellbeing.  Looking  ahead,  the  more  responsive  ci4es  will     seek  to  enable  communi4es  to  mould  their  neighbourhoods.      
  20. 20. Pop-­‐up  Economies     Crowd-­‐sourcing  will  enable  ‘pop-­‐up  economies’  where  communi4es  pool   resources  and  so  reduce  the  need  for  government  involvement.  The  downside   is  that  communi4es  create  their  own  iden4ty  making  “them  and  us”  obvious.      
  21. 21. Infrastructure  Responsibility   What  happens  when  the  city  becomes  so  transient  that  no  one  takes     overall  responsibility  for  its  infrastructure?  How  can  we  get  the  same     quality  of  infrastructure  in  rural  communi4es  as  there  is  in  ci4es?  
  22. 22. Hub-­‐hop   For  some,  na4onal  iden4ty  is  on  the  decline.  Look  out  for  the  rise  of  ‘Hub-­‐hops’   –  city  areas  where  cultures  have  merged  and  technology  has  advanced.  These   urban  districts  are  the  homes  from  home  for  the  nomadic  global  ci4zen.      
  23. 23. Public  Spaces     Governments  are  pressured  to  ensure  that  public  spaces  are  created     and  retained  –  Places  where  people  can  meet,  congregate,  relax,  even     where  land  is  valuable  and  constrained,  are  prized  focal  points  for  society.  
  24. 24. Satellite  Ci-es   The  growth  of  satellite  ci4es  and  networks  of  midi-­‐ci4es  in  many  regions  is   seen  as  a  preferred  route  to  more  mega-­‐city  development.  Connected  by  fast   infrastructure,  these  act  collec4vely  economically  but  in  a  sustainable  manner.  
  25. 25. Waste  Management   As  ci4es  become  ever  more  densely  populated,  new  approaches  to     waste  management  will  be  introduced.  Especially  in  fast-­‐growing     mega-­‐ci4es,  waste  is  seen  as  a  resource  and  a  source  of  energy.  
  26. 26. Rural  Upgrade   Rather  than  focus  so  much  on  ci4es  we  will  see  some  regions  place  more   emphasis  on  upgrading  rural  infrastructure  and  connec4vity.  This  will  help   stem  the  drive  of  migra4on  and  urbanisa4on  and  rejuvenate  village  life.    
  27. 27. Future  Agenda   84  Brook  Street   London   W1K  5EH   +44  203  0088  141   futureagenda.org   The  world’s  leading  open  foresight  program   What  do  you  think?   Join  In  |  Add  your  views  into  the  mix     www.futureagenda.org  

×