F. Thomas, FTR Rosny-sous-Bois, France
N. Vittadini, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, Italy
P. Gómez-Fernán...
   Diffusion and socio/cultural relevance of Broadband technology
    depends not only on access, but also on services up...
   “It's not about the technology or the artefact, but about the culture in
    which those technologies and artefacts ar...
 An operational definition of culture
     commonly shared symbols; values; beliefs; attitudes and their translation int...
Among broadband services significant to evidence new
user’s behaviour and cultural differences are web 2.0
services.

This...
Creative internet         all creative uses of the net
                          ranging from relatively straightforward u...
The comparative analysis of web2.0
      services in Europe & its data sources
Sources                         Sampling   ...
Social values and attitudes                   Cultural activities and consumption
      Postmaterialism                  ...
Conclusions

 Circular entertainment, the most similar to
  traditional media consumption, is widely
  adopted in all of ...
Countries can be profiled through 3 dimensions

  Social capital and cultural activities (53% of
  variance)

  Technolo...
Countries can be profiled by (1)


    Participation and cultural activities
      + cultural activities & consumption

 ...
Countries can be profiled by (2)

 
     Technology and sociability
       - price of the Internet
       + long-term Int...
The profiles of the country types
                                  Top cultural Cultural & Social actives Analogue Analog...
2
                                                                                                             Cultural & ...
social
                                  top cultural cultural and   analogue    analogue    actives and
                 ...
Starting from cultural influences we can describe three models of adoption:
   Flat model of the complete offer of web 2....
Conclusions

 Circular entertainment, the most similar to
  traditional media consumption, is widely
  adopted in all of ...
United in diversity ?

•   There are common traits in web2.0 usage in
    all of the 17 countries studied.
•   At the same...
How to contact the authors by email:

    frank.thomasftr@free.fr

    nicoletta.vittadini@unicatt.it

    gomezfer@cci...
Thomas Vittadini Gomez United in Diversity? Web2.0 and European and National Cultures in Europe
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Thomas Vittadini Gomez United in Diversity? Web2.0 and European and National Cultures in Europe

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The study explores the cultural bases of web2.0 use in European countries and discovers common profiles and differences between European countries.

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Thomas Vittadini Gomez United in Diversity? Web2.0 and European and National Cultures in Europe

  1. 1. F. Thomas, FTR Rosny-sous-Bois, France N. Vittadini, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Milano, Italy P. Gómez-Fernández, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain The Good, the Bad and the Challenging COST 298 Conference 13 to 15 May 2009 Copenhagen
  2. 2.  Diffusion and socio/cultural relevance of Broadband technology depends not only on access, but also on services uptake and use.  Services uptake is affected by differences in groups of people and levels of acceptance and use of a new technology.  Besides basic socio-economic and socio-demographic influences services uptake (use and incorporation in everyday life) is affected by cultural variables and needs a cultural approach integrating the appropriation of technologies into domestic cultures and their incorporation in accordance with social values and behaviour.
  3. 3.  “It's not about the technology or the artefact, but about the culture in which those technologies and artefacts are embeddedquot; (Boyd, 2007 )  Diffusion and socio/cultural relevance of Broadband technology depends not only on access, but also on services uptake and use.  Services uptake is affected by differences in groups of people and levels of acceptance and use of a new technology.  Besides basic socio-economic and socio-demographic influences services uptake (use and incorporation in everyday life) is affected by cultural variables and needs a cultural approach integrating the appropriation of technologies into domestic cultures and their incorporation in accordance with social values and behaviour.
  4. 4.  An operational definition of culture  commonly shared symbols; values; beliefs; attitudes and their translation into everyday social perceptions  A set of influences already identified by previous studies:  Consumers’ perception of broadband technology  HOFSTEDE: Power Distance;  HOFSTEDE: Collectivism versus Individualism;  HOFSTEDE: Uncertainty Avoidance;  HOFSTEDE: Short-term vs long-term orientation;  INGLEHART: Postmaterialism;  Social capital ;  Interpersonal trust; Trust on the net.
  5. 5. Among broadband services significant to evidence new user’s behaviour and cultural differences are web 2.0 services. This kind of services :  Can be assumed as indicators of an Information Society as they require more skills on the user’s part (markers of increasing digital literacy).  For the level of creative participation of the citizens they can be a promise of an expanding field of creative opportunity.  Are adopted according to the “moral economy of the households”.
  6. 6. Creative internet all creative uses of the net ranging from relatively straightforward user- generated content such as sharing photographs, to the distribution of more complex amateur- produced material Social Com puting all social uses of the net including collaboration, sharing, communication such as blogging, podcasting, uses of W iki applications, social networking, multimedia sharing, social tagging and social gaming Circular entertainm ent all applications that permits users to consume entertainment products through different devices, through peer to peer sharing or personal downloading and streaming
  7. 7. The comparative analysis of web2.0 services in Europe & its data sources Sources Sampling Plus Cons Web2.0 European Social Survey ++ social capital few ICT — social values Eurobarometer + recent EU citizens only + Flash Eurobarometer repetitive question development trend questions pop. Aged 15 to 74 yrs. ICT embargo questions Eurostat ICT household survey + recent aggregate data only + ICT covered ITU + aggregate data only + Hofstede IBM value questions no clear theoretical basis — managers few countries The consequence : incoherent country & item coverage, web2.0 undercovered & no household-level data
  8. 8. Social values and attitudes Cultural activities and consumption  Postmaterialism  Visual and manual artistic activities  Free opinion as a global value  Traditional artistic activities  Tolerance as a global value  Frequency of Cultural consumption  Non-users perceived as old fashioned  Width of Cultural consumption  Interpersonal trust  Power distance Social behaviour  Uncertainty avoidance • % Volunteering  Local attachment • Relative importance of family in comparison to friends Socio-demographic influences • Friends from abroad, in Europe • % Internet users in 2000 • Friends from outside Europe • Price of Internet • Length of residence • Hrs. worked per week • Household size
  9. 9. Conclusions  Circular entertainment, the most similar to traditional media consumption, is widely adopted in all of the countries studied.  Participation through content production, i.e. creative internet, is more diffused in culturally active countries.  Participation through social networks, i.e. social computing, is more diffused in non- social active countries.
  10. 10. Countries can be profiled through 3 dimensions  Social capital and cultural activities (53% of variance)  Technology and sociability (13% of variance)  Egalitarian values and active culture (8% of variance) • No longer considered here for clarity of the presentation • HOFSTEDE variables form part of this weak influence
  11. 11. Countries can be profiled by (1)  Participation and cultural activities + cultural activities & consumption + social values: postmaterialism + social bridging capital: volunteering, friends abroad, friends more important than family, interpersonal trust - size of household, length of residence
  12. 12. Countries can be profiled by (2)  Technology and sociability - price of the Internet + long-term Internet penetration of country - length of residence + friends from outside Europe - non-users perceived as old-fashioned +/- signs show direction of major influences (above |.8|), smaller influences not shown
  13. 13. The profiles of the country types Top cultural Cultural & Social actives Analogue Analogue & social social & cultural cultural cultural actives actives consumers consumers actives Cultural consumption + + - - & activities Postmaterialism ++ + - - - Volunteering ++ + - - Interpersonal trust ++ - - - Friends abroad + + - -- Family more valued -- - + + ++ than friends Length of residence - - + ++ Size of household + Technology maturity* + + - -- * Internet price in 2007 & Internet diffusion in 2000
  14. 14. 2 Cultural & social 1,5 NL actives UK 1 BE ES Social actives & cultural Technology & s ociability IE SE DK 0,5 PT DE FI consumers IT AT Analog cultural 0 actives GR -0,5 FR Analog cultural -1 PL consumers HU Top Cultural & -1,5 social actives -2 CZ -2,5 -3 -2 -1,5 -1 -0,5 0 0,5 1 1,5 Participation & culture
  15. 15. social top cultural cultural and analogue analogue actives and and social social cultural cultural cultural In % of resp. active actives, actives consumer consumers Play games, downloading 46 45 59 62 49 music, etc. Maintain profile on social 36 36 37 36 33 networking sites Upload photos, videos to 40 36 49 49 42 public website Transfer content from 42 38 41 49 46 Internet to private devices Source: Flash Eurob arometer 241, 2008  There is a general European model, a common minimum level of web2.0 usages, in all of the 17 European countries studied.  Web2.0 services are widely used in low-diffusion countries because of their majority of young users.  Transferring content to/from devices is highest in analogue cultural consumer countries.  Publication of visual content is most active in transformation countries.
  16. 16. Starting from cultural influences we can describe three models of adoption:  Flat model of the complete offer of web 2.0 services aimed to sustain both social and cultural activities already characterizing the countries. This model can be seen both in “top cultural and social performers” and in “cultural and social performers” which shows a homogeneous adoption pattern including both creative Internet and social computing activities.  Cultural goods oriented model defined by a clear privilege for circular entertainment practices aimed to increasing through web 2.0 services the number and the differentiation of cultural products that users can consume and the way they consume then (through mobile devices for example) while social activities seems to be left to real life. This model can be seen both in “social active and cultural consumers” and in “analogue cultural consumers”.  Cultural performance oriented model defined by a centrality of cultural activity (creative internet for example) through web 2.0 services and to achieve a more active social life for “analogue cultural active” countries.
  17. 17. Conclusions  Circular entertainment, the most similar to traditional media consumption, is widely adopted in all of the countries studied.  Participation through content production, i.e. creative internet, is more diffused in culturally active countries.  Participation through social networks, i.e. social computing, is more diffused in non- social active countries.
  18. 18. United in diversity ? • There are common traits in web2.0 usage in all of the 17 countries studied. • At the same time there are several clearly distinguishable country types that influence the path to a broadband society.
  19. 19. How to contact the authors by email:  frank.thomasftr@free.fr  nicoletta.vittadini@unicatt.it  gomezfer@ccinf.ucm.es Download of the full text : http://miha2.ef.uni-lj.si/cost298/gbc2009-proceedings/papers/P123.pdf

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