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STEM Education: An Introduction

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STEM Education: An Introduction

  1. 1. STEM Education An Introduction
  2. 2. Why is STEM Education important? <ul><li>Students need an education with a solid foundation in STEM areas so that they are prepared to both work and live in the 21st Century. </li></ul><ul><li>Since the 1960s, the demand for skills has changed significantly – the demand for routine manual task skills have decreased, while the demand for non-routine interactive task skills have increased significantly. </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce projections for 2014 by the U.S. Department of Labor show that 15 of the 20 fastest growing occupations require significant science or mathematics training to successfully compete for a job, while surveys find that fewer students are choosing to pursue advanced study in these areas. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why is STEM Education important? <ul><li>Enrollment in undergraduate degree programs in computer sciences is more than 50 percent lower than it was five years ago. (Computing Research Association) </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. ranks 20th internationally based on our share of graduate degrees awarded in engineering, computer science, and mathematics. (U.S. Department of Education) </li></ul><ul><li>By 2010, if current trends continue, more than 90 percent of all scientists and engineers will be living in Asia. (need source) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Why is STEM Education important? <ul><li>There are over 100 schools nationwide specializing in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, but the vast majority of students are getting shortchanged in this vital area of their education. </li></ul><ul><li>The gap is especially acute at the elementary level where 29% of K-5 teachers report that they teach science on two or fewer days a week. (State Technology Educators Association) </li></ul>
  5. 5. How is STEM Education different from the way we’ve always taught Science and Math? <ul><li>One word: Integrated. Traditionally, math and science are taught as separate subjects with technology often added as an afterthought. The STEM movement integrates all of these subjects and puts them at the forefront of education. </li></ul>
  6. 6. How is STEM Education different from the way we’ve always taught Science and Math? <ul><li>They are problem-solvers, able to frame problems as puzzles. </li></ul><ul><li>They are innovators, with the power to pursue independent and original investigation. </li></ul><ul><li>They are inventors, meeting the world’s needs by creatively designing and implementing solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>They are self-reliant, able to set agendas and work within specified timeframes. </li></ul><ul><li>They are logical thinkers, able to apply calculus-based concepts (found in 60% of all professions world-wide) and make advanced connections. </li></ul><ul><li>They are collaborators, able to flourish in group settings. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Barriers to STEM Education

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