Making Sense of Social Network Sites

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A high-level overview of some research perspectives on social network sites.

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Making Sense of Social Network Sites

  1. 1. Making Sense of Social Network Sites Fred Stutzman UNC School of Information and Library Science
  2. 2. Adoption Use Privacy Identity
  3. 3. 2005-Present
  4. 4. 300 Million Users 180 Countries 70 Translations 70% International
  5. 5. (Lenhart 2009)
  6. 6. http://bit.ly/32xwPF 46% Americans use SNS 65% Teens 12-17 73% Adult SNS users have FB Account Pew Internet and American Life Project
  7. 7. (InsideFacebook.com, 2009)
  8. 8. Value?
  9. 9. Social Ties http://bit.ly/Soi27
  10. 10. Offline to Online http://bit.ly/1eaqGm
  11. 11. Support http://bit.ly/1wH6ax
  12. 12. Participation http://bit.ly/1V6gRB
  13. 13. Challenges?
  14. 14. Privacy
  15. 15. Context Privacy Disclosure
  16. 16. Managing Contexts • Presence of multiple social groups • Behavioral Strategies • Mental Strategies • “Least Common Denominator” http://bit.ly/yS8yI (Lampinen et. al., 2009)
  17. 17. Context Tension • Connections across status and power boundaries • Propriety, work/ family • Inadvertent disclosures leading to harms http://bit.ly/6HTDB (Skeels and Grudin, 2009)
  18. 18. Two Studies
  19. 19. Study Goals • Why are motives for using multiple profiles? • What strategies to people employ in managing multiple profiles? • Is this an effective strategy? Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  20. 20. Motives • Privacy • Identity • Utility • Propriety http://www.flickr.com/photos/gi/435888435/ Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  21. 21. Forms of Regulation • Multiple identities in a single space • Single account, highly segmented privacy controls • Segmentation by site • Different social media for different audiences Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  22. 22. Concealment • Three genres identified • Pseudonymity • Practical Obscurity • Obscure name variants, non- disclosure of identity • Transparent Separations Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  23. 23. Going Friends Only
  24. 24. Friend Network • No Steps Significant • People with less friends were less likely to go friends- only (411 vs 500, p=.003)
  25. 25. Expectancy Violations Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  26. 26. Discursive Privacy • Active Privacy • Deleted a wall post left on someone else’s wall, Deleted a wall post someone left on your wall (α=.73) • Conversant Privacy • Advised someone to change their FB profile, Changed FB profile based on advice, Asked someone to make private a FB photo containing your image,Asked someone to completely remove FB image (α=.69)
  27. 27. Directions
  28. 28. Participants • 15 participants, two in 40’s, six in 50’s, seven in 60’s, nine females and six males • Semi-structured interviews, in-person and by phone • TOLA (Transitional, Older, Late Adopting Users) Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  29. 29. Framework • Adoption, Experience • Audience, Connections, Motivation • Social Support • Privacy Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  30. 30. Adoption • Reconnection drives adoption and use • Real names the norm, searching important • Reconstruction of the life story “[In Facebook] I will click on one of my friends and I will see two other people that I have not heard from in years and be able to get in touch with them and I think it’s a great thing for that.” Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  31. 31. Connections • Networks are close; small in size • Attention focused on “important” others • Reconnections, old crushes • Observing the extended family • Attention shifts; the “dance” of reconnection Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  32. 32. Contexts • Family, friends, reconnections and co- workers main cited contexts • The “time gap” as unique boundary • Lack of common ground • Shifting norms and identities • Bridging “different lives” Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  33. 33. Support • SNS is a supportive place • Emotional and informational support provisioned most commonly “One of my nieces’ parents has been rather ill, and people have been just giving her messages of support. She’s someone who is regularly on Facebook and talking about her mother’s condition and the surgeries she’s had, and people were voicing support for how she was doing.” Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  34. 34. Asking for support? • SNS is not a place where the sample goes for support • Privacy; Multiple groups; Compromising disclosures • Established modes for connection with supportive others Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  35. 35. Reciprocity • SNS is full of supportive givers; fewer “askers” • Users are willing to mobilize “In other words posting on the Wall where all of my friends can see it – everyone on my friends list can see it – I would not do that. And that is because of this mix of people, different kinds of relationships.” Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu
  36. 36. Implications
  37. 37. Transitions http://bit.ly/34H8uY
  38. 38. Information Grounds http://bit.ly/3LMJXF
  39. 39. Mobile http://bit.ly/2iEmDa
  40. 40. Thank you! Fred Stutzman: fred.stutzman@unc.edu Twitter @fstutzman http://fredstutzman.com Fred Stutzman, fred.stutzman@unc.edu

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