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Design for Deconstruction

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The Design for DeConstruction principles and thinking are essential in enabling a circular economy in construction. An updated Presentation for GVis2016, Feb 2016

The Design for DeConstruction principles and thinking are essential in enabling a circular economy in construction. An updated Presentation for GVis2016, Feb 2016

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Design for Deconstruction

  1. 1. Towards a Circular Economy Design for De-Construction Martin Brown Fairsnape @fairsnape VanDusen Visitor Center, Vancouver
  2. 2. “The Circular Economy involves a fundamental rethinking of products, materials, systems and commerce. It is not simply next-gen recycling” The State of Green Business 2016 GreenBiz@fairsnape
  3. 3. CIRCULAR ECONOMY THINKING Encourages a natural closed loop system which emulates natural flow, waste becomes the ingredients for the next product Net Positive Waste Conservation Plans not Waste Plans Red List / Precautionary Principle Design for De-Construction
  4. 4. Material Passport De-Construction Plans BIM Labeling of Connections Quest University, Squamish, BC ONE: Document materials and methods for deconstruction. @fairsnape
  5. 5. Re-utilised more than 80% of raw materials from other structures. 80% have reuse potential post building life. Material Passports Aliander HO, Netherlands @fairsnape
  6. 6. Consideration to future impact Future human, ecological health Future value TWO: Select materials using the Precautionary Principle @fairsnape
  7. 7. Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre, Whistler Visually Physically Ergonomically THREE: Design Connections that are accessible … @fairsnape
  8. 8. - Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability, UBC, Vancouver Visible Connections Living Building Challenge LEED Platinum CIRS, Vancouver @fairsnape
  9. 9. Binders, Glues, Sealers, Increase future health ecological issues Decrease future reuse potential FOUR: Eliminate Chemical Connections @fairsnape
  10. 10. Red List Compliant No Toxic Materials 250 year design life Living Building Challenge Bullitt Centre, Seattle @fairsnape
  11. 11. Roof Structure, Rovereto, Italy Bolted, screwed, nailed. Standard palette of connections Decrease future health ecological issues Increase future reuse potential FIVE: Use Mechanical Connections @fairsnape
  12. 12. Modular Homes, BRE
  13. 13. Improves component repair, upgrade, reuse, recycling SIX: Separate MEP Systems
  14. 14. “This is the worst this building should perform at for the rest of its life” Enable Continuous Improvement Kevin Hydes, Founder & CEO Intregal, on awarding LEED Certificates as USGBC Chair
  15. 15. Workhouse Tools, Inglewhite Lancashire Human scale components Improves ease of repair and replacement, Maintains skill variety SEVEN: Design to the Human
  16. 16. StrawBale Community Build Living Building Challenge Red List Material Free Cement Free Cuerdon Valley Park
  17. 17. Simple forms, standard dimensions Increases flexibility Ease of future incremental construction and / or deconstruction EIGHT: Simplicity of Structure and Form
  18. 18. Wood Buildings, Squamish BC
  19. 19. Using materials and systems that exhibit principles of modularity, independence, and standardization to facilitate reuse. NINE: Interchangeability Staircase, Hotel, Paris
  20. 20. Baxall Construction Streif Timber Modular System Modular Off Site Hankham School, Sussex @fairsnape
  21. 21. Access Material Flow Enable re-use Improves renovation, Improves disassembly risk and cost TEN: Safe Deconstruction @fairsnape
  22. 22. Control of Substances Hazardous to Health??? @fairsnape
  23. 23. #futurestorative @futuREstorative fairsnape@gmail.com @fairsnape … addressing the biological cycle as well as technical cycle …

Editor's Notes

  • The Living Building Challenge (LBC) is a philosophy, advocacy tool, and certification program that addresses development at all scales.

    The core underlying principle of the Living Building Challenge is that buildings should mimic nature and natural systems—and the Challenge uses the metaphor of the flower to illustrate this principle.

    Like a flower, all elements of the built environment are rooted in place.

    Unlike typical buildings, a flower has place-based solutions to meet all of its needs and to maintain balance with its surroundings.

    So, imagine a building that is informed by its eco-region’s characteristics. A building that generates energy with renewable resources, captures and treats water, operates efficiently and as part of a larger community; a building that acts as feedstock for new developments at the end of its life;

    and is beautiful….

  • ×