Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
My Brain Made Me Do it: DidNeuroscience Destroy Free          Will?    Devorah Segal, MD, PhD        April 24, 2012
Three steps to behavior1.   Intention (the plan)2.   Agency (the will)3.   Movement (the act)
What is free will?   Descartes: You are free if, under identical    circumstances, you could have acted otherwise.   Com...
Why do we care?
A Quick Tour of Your Brain
“The brain determines the mind, and the brain is a  physical entity, subject to all the rules of the  physical world. The ...
Libet’s 1983 experiment
Newer version: fMRI
Transmagnetic cranial stimulation
What are the implications?
Can these questions be resolved?
References   Ammon K and Dandevia SC. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can influence the    selection of motor programme...
Matsubashi experiment
Dr. Devorah Segal on My Brain Made Me Do It: Did Neuroscience Destroy Free Wil
Dr. Devorah Segal on My Brain Made Me Do It: Did Neuroscience Destroy Free Wil
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Dr. Devorah Segal on My Brain Made Me Do It: Did Neuroscience Destroy Free Wil

2,793 views

Published on

Presentation to our Tikvah Scholars Program on April 24, 2012.

  • Be the first to comment

Dr. Devorah Segal on My Brain Made Me Do It: Did Neuroscience Destroy Free Wil

  1. 1. My Brain Made Me Do it: DidNeuroscience Destroy Free Will? Devorah Segal, MD, PhD April 24, 2012
  2. 2. Three steps to behavior1. Intention (the plan)2. Agency (the will)3. Movement (the act)
  3. 3. What is free will? Descartes: You are free if, under identical circumstances, you could have acted otherwise. Compatibilism: You are free if you can follow your own desires and preferences. A set of capacities for imagining future courses of action, deliberating about one’s reason’s for choosing them, planning one’s actions in light of this deliberation and controlling actions in the face of competing desires
  4. 4. Why do we care?
  5. 5. A Quick Tour of Your Brain
  6. 6. “The brain determines the mind, and the brain is a physical entity, subject to all the rules of the physical world. The physical world is determined, so our brains must also be determined. If our brains are determined, and the brain is the necessary and sufficient organ that enables the mind, we are then left with these questions: Are the thoughts that arise from our mind also determined? Is the free will that we seem to experience just an illusion?” (Gazzaniga, 2004)
  7. 7. Libet’s 1983 experiment
  8. 8. Newer version: fMRI
  9. 9. Transmagnetic cranial stimulation
  10. 10. What are the implications?
  11. 11. Can these questions be resolved?
  12. 12. References Ammon K and Dandevia SC. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can influence the selection of motor programmes. J of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 1990; 53: 705-707 Chivers T. Neuroscience, free will and determinism. The Telegraph. Oct 12, 2010 Gazzaniga MS. The Ethical Brain. 2005; Dana Press Haynes JD. Decoding and predicting intentions. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2011; 1224: 9-21 Koch C. How physics and neuroscience dictate your “free” will. Sci Am Mind. May 2012; 22-27 Libet B, Gleason CA, Wright EW, Pearl DK. Time of conscious intention to act in relation to onset of cerebral activity (readiness-potential). The unconscious initiation of a freely voluntary act. Brain. 1983; 106: 623-642 Nahmias, E. Is neuroscience the death of free will? The NY Times. Nov 30, 2011. epub Neuroscience of free will. Wikipedia Rosen J. The brain on the stand. The NY Times. March 11, 2007. 49 Soon CS, Brass M, Heinze HJ, Haynes JD. Unconscious determinants of free decisions in the human brain. Nat Neurosci. 2008; 11: 543–545 Tancredi LR. The neuroscience of “free will”. Behav Sci Law. 2007; 25: 295-308
  13. 13. Matsubashi experiment

×