Classical Model White and Billings
History to Argument <ul><li>Rhetoric was taught as Oratory </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle defined rhetoric as it is still use...
Outline of Classical Model <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lead-in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overview of Situa...
Exercise 3.1 pg 86 <ul><li>Read and answer questions 1-4 </li></ul>
Introduction <ul><li>Presents the topic of inquiry or the problem requiring attention and perhaps briefly states the thesi...
Position Statement <ul><li>State the claim </li></ul>
Evidence and Appeals <ul><li>Pathos, Ethos, Logos </li></ul><ul><li>Direct and Indirect Evidence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DE ...
Use emotional appeals by playing on readers needs: Safety, love, youth, tradition, strength or power, compassion, etc.
Combining Appeals <ul><li>Evidence must be tested for Relevance, accuracy, thoroughness, and timeliness </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Refutation <ul><li>Def: the reference to opposing viewpoints and rebutting them. </li></ul><ul><li>The aim of refutation i...
Conclusion <ul><li>The minimal task of a conclusion is to provide a final wisdom about the thesis just argued. </li></ul>
Exercise 3.2  pg 100 <ul><li>Read and answer question 3 </li></ul>
Exercise 3.3  pg 103 <ul><li>Read and answer questions 1-2 </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Classical Model of Argument

2,425 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,425
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
60
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Classical Model of Argument

  1. 1. Classical Model White and Billings
  2. 2. History to Argument <ul><li>Rhetoric was taught as Oratory </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle defined rhetoric as it is still used today </li></ul><ul><li>Modes of Discourse (definition, comparison, temporal/causal connection, circumstance, testimony) descended from ancient rhetoric system </li></ul><ul><li>Debate is the sport aspect of argument </li></ul>
  3. 3. Outline of Classical Model <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lead-in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overview of Situation (context) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Background (specific to situation) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Position statement (thesis) </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals and evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Refutation (often presented simultaneously with evidence) </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
  4. 4. Exercise 3.1 pg 86 <ul><li>Read and answer questions 1-4 </li></ul>
  5. 5. Introduction <ul><li>Presents the topic of inquiry or the problem requiring attention and perhaps briefly states the thesis. </li></ul><ul><li>It establishes a clear context for the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>It engages the reader’s attention and desire to get “the whole picture.” </li></ul>
  6. 6. Position Statement <ul><li>State the claim </li></ul>
  7. 7. Evidence and Appeals <ul><li>Pathos, Ethos, Logos </li></ul><ul><li>Direct and Indirect Evidence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>DE consists of data from surveys, scientific experiments, case-in-point, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IE consists of formal analytical and mathematical reasoning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Step-by-step analysis of causes that lead to inevitable effects </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Use emotional appeals by playing on readers needs: Safety, love, youth, tradition, strength or power, compassion, etc.
  9. 9. Combining Appeals <ul><li>Evidence must be tested for Relevance, accuracy, thoroughness, and timeliness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance – evidence must relate directly to the claims being made </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accuracy – Double-check, precision relevant to what is being argued </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thoroughness – evidence must cover every facet or implication of the claim </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Timeliness – appropriately recent </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Refutation <ul><li>Def: the reference to opposing viewpoints and rebutting them. </li></ul><ul><li>The aim of refutation is to demonstarte the limitations or errors of challenging views. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Conclusion <ul><li>The minimal task of a conclusion is to provide a final wisdom about the thesis just argued. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Exercise 3.2 pg 100 <ul><li>Read and answer question 3 </li></ul>
  13. 13. Exercise 3.3 pg 103 <ul><li>Read and answer questions 1-2 </li></ul>

×