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Using the Free Music Archive: A Guide For Musicians with Creative Commons expert Eric Steuer

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Using the Free Music Archive: A Guide For Musicians with Creative Commons expert Eric Steuer

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This is the slide deck featured in a webinar put on by Cheyenne, current Director at the Free Music Archive, and her guest Eric Steuer from Creative Commons. The webinar is on the FMA YouTube channel.

This is the slide deck featured in a webinar put on by Cheyenne, current Director at the Free Music Archive, and her guest Eric Steuer from Creative Commons. The webinar is on the FMA YouTube channel.

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Using the Free Music Archive: A Guide For Musicians with Creative Commons expert Eric Steuer

  1. 1. SONGS ON THE FMA: REMIX, REUSE, RECYCLE Brought to you by the FMA & Creative Commons
  2. 2. The Free Music Archive  Started as a repository for free & Creative Commons-licensed music, including live recordings and Public Domain tracks  Affiliated with and founded by WFMU
  3. 3. Creative Commons  Established in 2001  Offers custom licenses to add to copyrighted work  CC licenses act as an addendum to copyright, not as an exception to it
  4. 4. AGENDA  Finding tracks  Understanding Creative Commons licenses  Using songs in projects  Sharing work with FMA & CC Communities
  5. 5. FMA Search Page Artist Pages Finding tracks on the FMA
  6. 6. Browse by Genre
  7. 7. Browse by Curator
  8. 8. Geography of the Search Page
  9. 9. Geography of the Search Page
  10. 10. Geography of the Search Page
  11. 11. Geography of the Search Page
  12. 12. Geography of the Search Page
  13. 13. Geography of the Search Page Download
  14. 14. Geography of the Search Page Listen in Pop-Out Player
  15. 15. Geography of an Artist Page
  16. 16. Geography of an Artist Page
  17. 17. Geography of an Artist Page
  18. 18. Contacting an artist  Do a web search  Look for website listed & search for “Contact”  Look for “Email this artist” button/contact link on an artist page:
  19. 19. Geography of an Artist Page
  20. 20. Geography of an Album Page
  21. 21. AGENDA  Finding songs  Understanding Creative Commons licenses  Using songs in projects  Sharing work with FMA & CC Communities
  22. 22. with Eric Steuer Creative Commons Licenses
  23. 23. What are Creative Commons licenses?  Creative Commons licenses are simple, standardized legal tools that creators can use to grant copyright permissions to their work.
  24. 24. What are Creative Commons licenses?  When you see a creative work online that is marked with a Creative Commons license, you know that its creator has offered it to the public for certain types of free use.
  25. 25. Creative Commons  There are six different Creative Commons licenses. Each one has different conditions. Which license a creator chooses will depend on how they want to share their work.
  26. 26. Creative Commons  There is no registration to use the Creative Commons licenses. Licensing a work is as simple as selecting which of the six licenses best meets your goals, and then marking your work in some way so that others know that you have chosen to release the work under the terms of that license.
  27. 27. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative Works Share Alike Step 1: Choose Conditions
  28. 28. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative Works Share Alike Step 1: Choose Conditions
  29. 29. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative Works Share Alike Step 1: Choose Conditions
  30. 30. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative Works Share Alike Step 1: Choose Conditions
  31. 31. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative Works Share Alike Step 1: Choose Conditions
  32. 32. Creative Commons
  33. 33. Creative Commons
  34. 34. Creative Commons CC licenses are expressed in three ways.
  35. 35. Creative Commons
  36. 36. Creative Commons
  37. 37. Creative Commons
  38. 38. Creative Commons
  39. 39. AGENDA  Finding songs  Understanding Creative Commons licenses  Using songs in projects  Sharing work with FMA & CC Communities
  40. 40. Using Songs from the FMA
  41. 41. Podcasting with songs from FMA  Webcasts – all songs on FMA are cleared for free download, use in podcasts and webcasts, and for noncommercial radio broadcasts.  When in doubt, ask.
  42. 42. Podcasting with songs from FMA  Webcasts – all songs on FMA are cleared for free download, use in podcasts and webcasts, and for noncommercial radio programs.  Attribution is required for all Creative Commons work.
  43. 43. Podcasting with songs from FMA  Webcasts – all songs on FMA are cleared for free download, use in podcasts and webcasts, and for noncommercial radio programs.  Attribution is required for all Creative Commons work.  Songs on FMA may not be ‘radio friendly’ in terms of language.
  44. 44. Remixing songs from FMA  Depends on the license  Unless specified, tracks are available as complete pieces (which can be sampled). FMA does not specifically host packs of individual tracks, stems, etc.
  45. 45. Covering Songs from FMA  Artists retain copyright over their works.  Creative Commons licenses grant some permissions.  If in doubt, contact the artist.
  46. 46. FMA-specific licenses  FMA Download-Only  You are free to stream, download, copy, store and reproduce this work as reasonably necessary for your personal, noncommercial use. You may not alter, perform, adapt or otherwise redistribute the work under any conditions.
  47. 47. AGENDA  Finding songs  Understanding Creative Commons licenses  Using songs in projects  Sharing work with FMA & CC Communities
  48. 48. Contact us: freemusicarchive.org/Contact/ How to submit work to FMA
  49. 49. 1. Send us an email.  musicsubmissions (at) freemusicarchive (dot) org  Send us a link to the work you would like to share. Streaming services preferred.  List 3-5 of your best/recommended tracks; what you might like to use as a first impression of your work
  50. 50. 2. Choose a license for your work.  Review licenses at creativecommons.org/licenses or creativecommons.org/choose/  Choose the one that fits your needs best.  Include a link to the license, or indicate your preference for FMA-Only, Public Domain/CC0, Art Libre, etc.
  51. 51. 3. Tell us if you’re here already.  Include your FMA Username (if you've already signed up).  Let us know if an FMA curator has showcased your work in the past.
  52. 52. 4. Do some reading  Review our Upload Policy and make sure your music is a good fit.  Quality mp3s ready to roll  Original work that you can license how you want
  53. 53. 5. Sit tight!  Our curators will review your work (we get a lot of stuff to review constantly) and will be in touch regarding how to move forward.
  54. 54. Other places to share work  Archive.org  Jamendo  ccMixter  Bandcamp  Soundcloud
  55. 55. Questions, Comments, etc? contact@freemusicarchive.org

Editor's Notes

  • When you see a creative work online that is marked with a Creative Commons license, you know that its creator has offered it to the public for certain types of free use. And typically speaking, you’ll know that a work is licensed under a Creative Commons license because it has an icon like the ones here, or it says “licensed under a Creative Commons license,” etc.
  • This is HTML code that has embedded metadata about the work (who it’s authored by, CC license status, etc.).
  • Here are the four different conditions that make up the various Creative Commons licenses.
  • All CC licenses require attribution.
    A work with the attribution condition alone allows others to copy, distribute, display, and perform the copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit in the manner specified
  • The Noncommercial condition lets others copy, distribute, display, and perform the work for noncommercial purposes only.
    The author retains the commercial rights.
    Users may still request to use the work commercially, which may cost money.
    This is a good time to talk about the fact that Creative Commons licenses are non-exclusive:

    +++Licensors always have the option of entering into separate arrangements for the sharing of their material in addition to applying a CC license.

    You may offer the licensed material under other licenses in addition to the CC license (a practice commonly referred to as "dual licensing"). For example, you may wish to license a video game soundtrack under both a CC license and the GPL, so that it may be used under either set of terms. A reuser may then choose which set of terms to comply with. Or, for example, you may offer your material to the public under a NonCommercial license, but offer commercial permissions to fee-paying customers.
  • The No Derivatives condition allows others to copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of the work, not derivative works based upon it.
    For the purposes of CC licenses, syncing music in timed-relation with a moving image is a derivative work.
  • Allows others to distribute derivative works only under a license that is the same as, or compatible with, the license that governs the work.
    This is the only license term that mandates the new work be placed into the commons.
  • You can also use CC to waive all your copyrights to a work. CC0 is a legal and technical tool that enables this. (It is a waiver, not a license.)
  • Here’s an example of a song page on the Free Music Archive that’s marked with a Creative Commons license.
  • Here’s that example again of a song that’s marked with a Creative Commons license.
  • Click that icon and you’re brought to the “Human Readable Deed” – a webpage that tells you clearly and concisely what you can and can’t do with that song.
  • “Lawyer Readable” Legal Code
  • This is HTML code that has embedded metadata about the work (who it’s authored by, CC license status, etc.).
  • ×