Successfully reported this slideshow.

Using Music from the Free Music Archive in Education with Creative Commons expert Jane Park

2

Share

1 of 50
1 of 50

Using Music from the Free Music Archive in Education with Creative Commons expert Jane Park

2

Share

Download to read offline

This is the slide deck featured in a webinar put on by Cheyenne, current Director at the Free Music Archive, and her guest Jane Park from Creative Commons. The webinar is on the FMA YouTube channel.

This is the slide deck featured in a webinar put on by Cheyenne, current Director at the Free Music Archive, and her guest Jane Park from Creative Commons. The webinar is on the FMA YouTube channel.

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Using Music from the Free Music Archive in Education with Creative Commons expert Jane Park

  1. 1. MUSIC FOR EDUCATORS Presented by the Free Music Archive & Creative Commons Cheyenne Hohman & Jane Park
  2. 2. WHO WE ARE & WHAT WE DO  Jane Park  Creative Commons  Cheyenne Hohman  Free Music Archive
  3. 3. THE FREE MUSIC ARCHIVE  Started as a repository for free & Creative Commons-licensed music, including live recordings and Public Domain tracks  Affiliated with and founded by WFMU
  4. 4. WHY USE THE FMA?  It’s free!  It’s always growing!  It’s the largest curated repository for Creative Commons music online.
  5. 5. CREATIVE COMMONS  Established in 2001  Offers custom licenses to add to copyrighted work  CC licenses are an expression of copyright, not a waiver of it  Basic intro to CC, what it is, how it works, examples of use in education
  6. 6. CC OVERVIEW  We make sharing content easy, legal, and scalable. Why?  Traditional © was designed for old distribution models before the Internet. But now, it’s easier to create and share than ever before.  Legally, it’s not so easy. It’s confusing!  CC makes it easy. With CC licenses, creators can grant copy and reuse permissions in advance.  We offer six licenses and two public domain tools. We’re a nonprofit so all are free for you to use!
  7. 7. CC LICENSE ELEMENTS  Attribution  ShareAlike  NonCommercial  NoDerivatives
  8. 8. CC LICENSES  CC BY  CC BY-NC  CC BY-SA  CC BY-NC-SA  CC BY-ND  CC BY-NC-ND  More info at http://creativecommons.org/licenses
  9. 9. PUBLIC DOMAIN TOOLS  CC0 – for you to waive your rights in a work  Public Domain Mark – for institutions, like museums, to mark work that has passed into the public domain  More info at http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain
  10. 10. Lawyer Readable Legal Code
  11. 11. Human Readable Deed
  12. 12. Machine Readable Metadata
  13. 13. SCENARIO A: STUDENT PODCAST  To help students learn how to use audio equipment, editing software and build storytelling skills, you want your students to produce short podcasts.
  14. 14. SCENARIO A: STUDENT PODCAST  To help students learn how to use audio equipment, editing software and build storytelling skills, you want your students to produce short podcasts.  You can use music under these CC licenses:  CC BY  CC BY-SA  CC BY-NC  CC BY-NC-SA
  15. 15. SCENARIO B: STUDENT FILM  To help students learn how to use video equipment, editing software and build storytelling skills, you want your students to produce short films.
  16. 16. SCENARIO B: STUDENT FILM  To help students learn how to use video equipment, editing software and build storytelling skills, you want your students to produce short films.  You can use music under these CC licenses:  CC BY  CC BY-SA  CC BY-NC  CC BY-NC-SA
  17. 17. SCENARIO C: STUDENT REMIXES  You want your students to take existing works and mix them into something new.
  18. 18. SCENARIO C: STUDENT REMIXES  You want your students to take existing works and mix them into something new.  You can use content under these CC licenses:  CC BY  CC BY-SA  CC BY-NC  CC BY-NC-SA
  19. 19. NOTE:  If your students are not remixing, but just using a work verbatim without making any changes, then they can use content under any of the CC licenses, including CC BY-ND or CC BY-NC-ND.  Example: A student finds an image of a snake under CC BY-ND and puts it in his report about snakes. He does not change the image and provides correct attribution to the creator.
  20. 20. JANE [USING CC LICENSES IN STUDENT WORK]  Students can find CC-licensed music on FMA and other kinds of media on other platforms  Students should give credit to creators of CC licensed materials they use!  Students can also choose a CC license for their own work
  21. 21. Best Practices for Attribution: (TASL)  Title  Author  Source – Link to work  License – Name + Link http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Best_practices_for_attribution
  22. 22. AN IDEAL ATTRIBUTION
  23. 23. ATTRIBUTING MUSIC IN VIDEO OR AUDIO  Have a credits page at the end of the video that displays all relevant info  Publish a web page with credits info. Provide link to web page at end of video or in the information section if video is hosted on a third-party platform like YouTube  Mention all credits within video itself visually or verbally if it’s a podcast
  24. 24. FINDING STUFF ON THE FMA  Browse by Genre  Browse by Curator  Use FMA Search interface
  25. 25. BROWSE BY GENRE
  26. 26. BROWSE BY CURATOR
  27. 27. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE
  28. 28. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE
  29. 29. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE
  30. 30. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE
  31. 31. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE
  32. 32. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE Download
  33. 33. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SEARCH PAGE Listen in Pop-Out Player
  34. 34. GEOGRAPHY OF AN ARTIST PAGE
  35. 35. GEOGRAPHY OF AN ARTIST PAGE
  36. 36. GEOGRAPHY OF AN ARTIST PAGE
  37. 37. CONTACTING AN ARTIST  Do a web search  Look for website listed & search for “Contact”  Look for “Email this artist” button/contact link on an artist page:
  38. 38. GEOGRAPHY OF AN ARTIST PAGE
  39. 39. GEOGRAPHY OF AN ALBUM PAGE
  40. 40. ATTRIBUTION - TASL  Title  Author  Source - usually a URL.  License – abbreviations are OK Via CC Wiki
  41. 41. OTHER PLACES TO LOOK FOR MUSIC  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Sound  http://search.creativecommons.org  https://www.jamendo.com/en/  http://dig.ccmixter.org/  http://soundcloud.com/
  42. 42. HAPPY HUNTING! contact@freemusicarchive.org

Editor's Notes

  • CC filled the gap between “all rights reserved” and the public domain. Before CC, an institution could either reserve all rights or give them all way. With CC, an institution can now maintain its copyright, while granting certain reuse permissions to the public.
  • All of our legal tools are designed with the web in mind. CC licenses have a unique 3 layer design, which is a fancy way of saying that you can communicate the license in three ways: one way for lawyers, one way for normal users, and one way for machines.

    This layered design is part of what makes CC the global standard for copyright licensing.
  • So just a quick snapshot of each - the first, base layer is the actual license, the document that lawyers around the world have drafted and vetted so that the license works like it’s supposed to according to US and international copyright laws. We call this the legal code - written by and for lawyers.
  • * The second layer is written in a format that any user could read and understand.
    * We call this the “human readable” summary of the license, which sums up the most important terms and conditions of the license in non-technical language.
    * One way to think of it is as the user-friendly interface to the actual license.
  • * The third and final layer is the machine-readable metadata. This is what really makes our tools really relevant for the digital age. This small snippet of HTML code summarizes the license and associated metadata (such as author and date) into a format that software, search engines, and other kinds of technology can understand.
    * We have designed the code so it works web pages, and have made it easy to use by anyone. All you have to do is copy and paste it into you your webpage editor. We also work closely with institutions to get the marking and placement of this right within their larger systems.
  • The three layers are operable around the world. As I mentioned before, all of our licenses have been designed and vetted by legal experts and aligned to international copyright laws. We have nearly 300 affiliates working to ensure legality and adoption of our tools in 79 countries.
  • We recently issued a SOTC report where Google generously gave us data regarding CC licensed works on the web. The conservative estimate today is that 882 million works exist under CC licenses or CC0.
  • And much these works are images, videos, songs, podcasts, government works, educational materials, scientific data, and more.

    The trend over the years indicates that more creators are allowing adaptations and commercial use than before. The details of these numbers are available online as part of the SOTC report: http://stateof.creativecommons.org/
  • And of course there is the growing open educational resources movement which means that there are a lot of educational materials out there under CC licenses. You’ve probably all heard of MIT OpenCourseWare and Khan Academy, but there are many many more educational organizations licensing their materials under CC as well.
  • So when once you’ve found the CC licensed work you want to use, you do need to give credit. To help users with that, we’ve developed best practice guidelines based on the CC license requirement for how to attribute the author.

    The link is displayed here, but I’ll also paste into the chat.. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Best_practices_for_attribution .. And you can take a quick look.

    So please do send your users to this link for best practice examples and details, but if you want a quick reference acronym, we recommend using “TASL” when attributing authors of CC licensed works – which stands for Title Author Source License.

    So Title and Author are self-explanatory; Source means link to the original work where you accessed it on the web; and License means the name of the license, for example CC BY or Creative Commons Attribution, and a link to the license. The link is very important because that’s how people who don’t know what Creative Commons is know what they can and can’t do with a work.
  • Here’s a preview of that tool. You can play with it right now by going to
    http://creativecommons.org/choose while I talk – I’ll paste the url into the chat.

    There you go. This is the tool that you can use to add the CC license to your own website or blog. Or point your patrons to who want to license their own works.
  • ×