DH101 2013/2014 course 2

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DH101 2013/2014 course 2

  1. 1. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 Digital Humanities Laboratory Frederic Kaplan frederic.kaplan@epfl.ch
  2. 2. Structure of today's course •Skill: Distinguishing for concepts • Digital Humanities • Digital Studies • Humanities computing • Studies about Digital Culture •Skill: Writing an academic blog post with Wordpress •First Assignment (Deadline Oct 16th) •Exercize on Massive Digitization Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 2 o
  3. 3. Skill : Distinguishing four concepts : Digital Humanities, Humanities Computing, Digital Studies, Studies about Digital Culture Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 3 o
  4. 4. Distinguishing four concepts •Only one answer is correct • (1) A=Digital Humanities, B=Humanities Computing, C=Studies about Digital Culture, D=Digital Studies • (2) A=Studies about Digital Culture, B=Digital Studies, C=Humanities Computing, D=Digital Humanities • (3) A’=Humanities Computing, B’=Studies about Digital Culture, C’=Digital Humanities, D’=Digital Studies • (4) A’=Digital Humanities, B’=Humanities Computing, C’=Studies about Digital Culture, D’=Digital Studies Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 4 o
  5. 5. Distinguishing four concepts: Your answers •Only one answer is correct • (1) A=Digital Humanities, B=Humanities Computing, C=Studies about Digital Culture, D=Digital Studies • (2) A=Studies about Digital Culture, B=Digital Studies, C=Humanities Computing, D=Digital Humanities • (3) A’=Humanities Computing, B’=Studies about Digital Culture, C’=Digital Humanities, D’=Digital Studies • (4) A’=Digital Humanities, B’=Humanities Computing, C’=Studies about Digital Culture, D’=Digital Studies Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 5 o
  6. 6. Digital Humanities Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 6 o
  7. 7. Digital + Humanities Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 7 o
  8. 8. Digital Systems •Digital systems represent information using discrete values. •Ex: Binary encoding (but the digital systems can also be use other bases) Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 8 o
  9. 9. Analog Systems •Analog systems represent information using a continuous function. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 9 o
  10. 10. Digitus •The word digital comes from digit and digitus (finger in Latin) because fingers are used for discrete counting Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 10 o
  11. 11. What disciplines are covered by the term humanities? Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 11 o
  12. 12. What disciplines are covered by the term humanities? •ancient and modern languages •literature •history •philosophy •religion •visual and performing arts •anthropology •area studies •communication studies •cultural studies •law •linguistics Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 12 o
  13. 13. Disambiguation: Humanist and humanism •Scholars that work in the Humanities are called humanists •The term humanists is also linked with the Renaissance idea of humanism (e.g. Erasmus is a humanist) •Scholars working in the Humanities are not necessarily humanists in the philosophical sense. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 13 o
  14. 14. Digital Humanities is a new word Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 14 o
  15. 15. ... essentially used in the US, UK and Germany Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 15 o
  16. 16. The term Humanities computing is declining Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 16 o
  17. 17. Humanities computing was about applying computational approaches to humanities research questions. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 17 o
  18. 18. ... Digital methods applied to literature, history, etc. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 18 o
  19. 19. Digital methods tend to disolve frontiers •One consequence of the use of digital methods in the humanities was the evolution of the traditional disciplinary frontiers. •Various disciplines discovered that they were dealing with similar objects and methods (databases, pattern recognition, etc.) •There were more similarities between disciplines tryping to use computational methods to study their object, then inside some disciplines. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 19 o
  20. 20. A terminological change •The terminological change from humanities computing to digital humanities has been attributed to John Unsworth, Ray Siemens and Susan Schreibman, editors of the monograph A Companion to Digital Humanities (2004) •Contrary to Humanities Computing, the term Digital Humanities covers both the methods of contemporary humanities in studying digital objects, and symetrically the use of digital technology for studying humanities objects. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 20 o
  21. 21. A focus on practice •Many researchers in the Digital Humanities field insist on the importance of practice over theory •One specifity of this community is the organization of THATCamp, The Humanities and Technology Camp, open, inexpensive meetings where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot. •The slogan of the THATCamps is More hack, less yacks •In the same line, Claire Warwick, UCL London suggests a very open definition: If you think you are doing it, then you probably are •This is why this course focuses on skills more than theory Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 21 o
  22. 22. A global phenomena •Although the Digital Humanities acamedic world is currently still dominated by the anglo-american scholars, there is a clear goal to make it a global multilinguistic phenomena. •The Digital Humanities Call for Paper has been translated in 14 languages by volunteers. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 22 o
  23. 23. Lost in translation •This raises the question on how to translate the term Digital Humanities in other languages? •Italian for instance still use the term Informatica umanistica which is closer from humanities computing than Digital Humanities Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 23 o
  24. 24. The French vs Swiss French debate •The official translation of Digital in French is num´erique. So many French researcher use the term Humanit´es num´eriques •In French speaking Switzerland, the term Humanit´es digitales is preferred because of the richer reference to digitus (the finger) and the related concepts of doigt´e. •Digital Humanities include a lot of hands-on approaches. •Humanities that you do not only with your brains but also with your fingers. •Time will tell which term will be preferred by the French speaking community. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 24 o
  25. 25. Digital Studies •Bernard Stiegler argues that the term Digital Humanities is too narrow and that the effects of digitalization go beyond the field of the Humanities to affect all the knowledge fields. •He prefers to the term Digital studies by opposition to Analog studies. •The effects of digitalization must also be studied on fields like physics, biology, geology and other natural sciences. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 25 o
  26. 26. Studies about digital culture •The Digital Revolution is transforming all aspects of our culture. •3.1 Billion social network accounts, 1 Billion Facebook, 425 Million Twitter, 90 Billion emails/day, 325 Millions photos shared/day, 1 Billion Google searches/day •Most DH scholars consider that studies about digital culture are parts of Digital Humanities Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 26 o
  27. 27. The right answer is (3) •Only one answer is correct • (1) A=Digital Humanities, B=Humanities Computing, C=Studies about Digital Culture, D=Digital Studies • (2) A=Studies about Digital Culture, B=Digital Studies, C=Humanities Computing, D=Digital Humanities • (3) A’=Humanities Computing, B’=Studies about Digital Culture, C’=Digital Humanities, D’=Digital Studies • (4) A’=Digital Humanities, B’=Humanities Computing, C’=Studies about Digital Culture, D’=Digital Studies Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 27 o
  28. 28. Skill: Writing an academic blog post with Wordpress Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 28 o
  29. 29. From Wikipedia •WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a dynamic content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. •It has many features including a plug-in architecture and a template system. •WordPress is currently the most popular blogging system in use on the Internet (60 millions websites) Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 29 o
  30. 30. From Wikipedia •It was first released on May 27, 2003, by founders Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little as a fork of b2/cafelog. •As of September 2013, the latest version 3.6 had been downloaded over 6 million times. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 30 o
  31. 31. Demonstration : Inside dh101.ch Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 31 o
  32. 32. Assignment •Write a blog post on dh101.ch presenting a current trend of DIgital Humanities by presenting three selected abstract from the 2013 conference •You can have a look at a the trend blog post on dh101.ch •The abstracts can be found here : http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ •The blog post must have more than 500 words. It must not be a copy-and-past of the discussed articles or another blog post. •The blog post needs to be new and relevant for the global DH community (remember dh101.ch is followed by many other DHers outside the class) •This blog post counts for 30 % of your final grade •As you are a DH101 author, you can publish the abstract when you want on the website. The Deadline is October 16th. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 32 o
  33. 33. Evaluation of the assignment and peer-reviewing •Each assignment is going to be evaluated by the professor. •It is the professor’s grade that will count as the official grade. •For grading, the professor will follow a strict evaluation grid (next slide) •In addition, each assignment will be graded by five students •The student will follow the same evaluation grid. •Students will be graded for grading (10 % of the final semester mark). •If you do your grading seriously you should all get the maximum of these 10 % •We will then compare if grading by student is similar to the grading by the professor. Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 33 o
  34. 34. The evaluation grid (0-6) •The blog post has only original content (no copy-and-paste from the abstracts or other sources) • The blog post follows the guidelines of the assignment (it discusses three articles, it identifies a trend) • Grade will be at least 4, but can go up to 6 if the following requirements are met • (Language) The English of the blog post is correct and clearly understandable +0.5 • (Wordpress) The blog post’s keywords are relevant and the blog post layout is adapted to its content +0.5 • (Content 1) The blog post is not just a summary of three articles, it really compares them. +0.5 • (Content 2) The blog post’s content is well argumented and the identified trend is interesting +0.5 • The blog does not follow the guidelines • Grade = 3 •The blog post includes copy-and-paste of other sources • Grade = 0 Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 34 o
  35. 35. Next week: Massive digitization Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 35 o
  36. 36. The exercise of today will a collective investigation into a open complex problem Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 36 o
  37. 37. Objective: Learning to divide a complex problem into smaller chunks Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 37 o
  38. 38. How can we digitize 80 km of archives in ten years ? •Question 1: Estimate the number of persons to be employed and their function •Question 2: Decide on the kind of scanners to be used •Question 3: Estimate the size of the data storage needed •Question 4: Estimate the overall budget Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 38 o
  39. 39. How can we digitize 80 km of archives in ten years ? •Strategy to answer these questions: Divide them into a set of subquestions to be checked first. •Write these subquestions in framapad. •Put your name under the subquestion you want to investigate. •Start searching for information in groups and write the relevant findings / URL on the framapad Digital Humanities 101 - 2013/2014 - Course 2 | 2013 39 o

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