Integrating Effective Prototyping Into Your Design Process

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There is no right prototyping methodology. There are only methodologies that are more or less appropriate for a given situation.

Prototypes are just tools we use to answer questions and communicate ideas. This presentation discusses the questions that different methodologies are most appropriate for answering, as well as how to integrate prototyping into particular contexts of design.

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  • Fred: i was there at your session on the summit, browsing the slides and looking back, this was one of the best sessions i attended, very practical and down to earth. I will use your info and share it with my coworkers.

    thanks.
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  • Guest8f887f: You do what you can do in 40 minutes. Slides are just visual aides, not the complete and total substance of a presentation. I am currently waiting on the audio from the presentation to be delivered to me. I talk about plenty of examples, just not on my slides.
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  • One of the best presentations that I have seen that is both practical and educational all at the same time. Plus, it has werewolves in it. How can you go wrong with a bass playing werewolf?
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  • Integrating Effective Prototyping Into Your Design Process

    1. Integrating Eective Prototyping into Your Design Process Fred Beecher, Senior User Experience Consultant Monday, March 23, 2009
    2. Monday, March 23, 2009
    3. Monday, March 23, 2009
    4. The Dimensions of Fidelity “Production Ready” Prototype Paper JPG Image Mapped HVF Interactive Prototype JPGs (“Slap Prototype Map”) Visual Fidelity Paper WF Clickable LVF Interactive Prototype Wireframe Prototype Proof of Concept Wireframe Image Mapped Sketch Sketches Scans Functional Fidelity Monday, March 23, 2009
    5. Two Additional Dimensions of Fidelity Technical Fidelity • “Production-ready” prototypes • Your prototype is either production-ready or it ain’t PROBLEMS • Constrains UX design concepting • Expensive time-consuming WHEN CAN IT WORK? • You have mad coding skillz • Your organization has mad resources Monday, March 23, 2009
    6. Two Additional Dimensions of Fidelity Fidelity of Content • Your prototype is NOT just interaction • Content plays a large role in testing, and testing is the PROBLEMS • You can’t have a prototype without content • Testing prototypes with crappy content will give you crappy data YOUR PROTOTYPES MUST CONTAIN PLAUSIBLE CONTENT IF YOU WANT TO GET GOOD DATA OUT OF TESTING THEM Monday, March 23, 2009
    7. “There is no such thing as high or low fidelity, only appropriate fidelity.” - Bill Buxton Monday, March 23, 2009
    8. What LVF/LFF Prototypes Are Good For Discovering missing functionality Finding problems with a workflow Separating good UX design concepts from... less good ones Getting preliminary consensus on a UX design direction: “Is this what you mean?” Monday, March 23, 2009
    9. What LVF/HFF Prototypes Are Good For Enabling the use of user testing as a design tool Proof-of-Concept testing of isolated interactions Enabling remote prototype testing Validating UX design direction with stakeholders Validating UX implementation of requirements with stakeholders Supplementing printed documentation for development teams Monday, March 23, 2009
    10. Monday, March 23, 2009
    11. What HVF/LFF Prototypes Are Good For Discovering any usability problems introduced by the visual design Finding problems with a workflow when testing with non-savvy user groups Iterating through multiple form factor concepts when designing physical interactive devices Monday, March 23, 2009
    12. What HVF/HFF Prototypes Are Good For Enabling user testing as a design tool when integrating new functionality into established systems User testing with non-savvy user groups Supplementing printed documentation for OFFSHORE development teams “Production-ready” prototypes, by definition, require both high visual and functional fidelity Wowing stakeholders into submission Monday, March 23, 2009
    13. Integrating Prototyping Into Your Process • Start Small – Maybe even just a tiny, cheap little proof-of-concept • Know what questions your prototype must answer – Early in design, the questions will likely be more structural – Later on, the questions will relate more to usability • Choose a level of fidelity that will answer them – Lo fi is generally better at addressing big structural issues – Hi fi is generally better at addressing usability issues • Choose a fidelity-appropriate methodology test • Evangelize, evangelize, evangelize! Monday, March 23, 2009
    14. Design Context: Corporate-Agile-Mature UX • Develop the detailed scenarios you want to test • Sketch two or three of your UX design concepts into simple prototypes test to choose one • Build a small interactive prototype of the critical interactions proof-of-concept test them • Work with the team’s prototyper develop a fleshed-out production-ready prototype test it too Monday, March 23, 2009
    15. Design Context: Corporate-Waterfall- New UX • Develop detailed scenarios you want to test • Build an interactive prototype walk through it with project stakeholders • If possible, test that same prototype with users • Simultaneously walk through the printed documentation the prototype when handing it o to developers • If possible, generate an annotated prototype for developers’ reference Monday, March 23, 2009
    16. Design Context: Consulting/Agency • Develop the detailed scenarios you want to test • Sketch two or three of your UX design concepts into simple prototypes test to choose one – Walk through it with the client to validate your direction • Build a small interactive prototype of the critical interactions proof-of-concept test them – Walk through it with the client to validate your direction • Flesh out the interactive prototype test – Walk through it with visual designers developers, along with paper documentation Monday, March 23, 2009
    17. Design Context: Hardware Device • Develop the detailed scenarios you want to test • Do as many iterations of a low functional fidelity prototype as you can – They may need to have high visual fidelity if you’re not designing for a tech-savvy audience • Do a high-functional fidelity prototype to supplement the printed documentation you provide to the engineers • Proactively keep yourself involved once they start building hardware prototypes Monday, March 23, 2009
    18. Thanks! Questions? Fred Beecher fbeecher@gmail.com @fred_beecher Monday, March 23, 2009

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