Dart Unit 02 Disaster Management

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Disaster Management module for the Disaster Animal Response Team (DART).

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  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Training 04/07/10 Purpose: Show the difference between emergencies, disasters and catastrophes and the different types of response they require. An emergency can be dealt with from an AGENCY perspective: narrow focus on implementing procedures and protocols, knowing that other agencies will be available to deal with other aspects of the emergency. Auxiliary organizations are rarely needed. In a disaster other agencies may not be available and the problems are more complex, requiring responders to deal with it from a NEEDS perspective. Emergency procedures and protocols may not work, requiring flexibility. Auxiliary organizations will be needed. Convergent volunteers will provide opportunities to expand the response to match the needs. In a catastrophe responding agencies will be overwhelmed and unable to deal with all the needs of the communities that were impacted. Convergent volunteers and emergent volunteer organizations will be utilized (together with VOADs - Voluntary Organizations Assisting with Disasters).
  • DART Training 04/07/10 Purpose: Show the difference between emergencies, disasters and catastrophes and the different types of response they require. An emergency can be dealt with from an AGENCY perspective: narrow focus on implementing procedures and protocols, knowing that other agencies will be available to deal with other aspects of the emergency. Auxiliary organizations are rarely needed. In a disaster other agencies may not be available and the problems are more complex, requiring responders to deal with it from a NEEDS perspective. Emergency procedures and protocols may not work, requiring flexibility. Auxiliary organizations will be needed. Convergent volunteers will provide opportunities to expand the response to match the needs. In a catastrophe responding agencies will be overwhelmed and unable to deal with all the needs of the communities that were impacted. Convergent volunteers and emergent volunteer organizations will be utilized (together with VOADs - Voluntary Organizations Assisting with Disasters).
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • DART Team Training 04/07/10
  • Dart Unit 02 Disaster Management

    1. 1. + + +
    2. 2. Unit 2: Disaster Management © 2006-2010 Frans Hoffman
    3. 3. Local Emergency Local Disaster Regional Disaster Disaster Example 2005 San Ramon Stray Kitten Tests Positive For Rabies 2006 Walnut Creek apartment complex fire 9/11 Terrorist attack, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake 1991 Oakland Hills Fire 1906 San Francisco Quake 1918 Flu Pandemic 2005 Hurricane Katrina Impact on community infrastructure Localized effects, if any Localized damage or loss, Disruption of social life Extensive damage or destruction, Public Outcry Impact on response infrastructure Largely unaffected Localized damage or loss of response infrastructure Completely overwhelmed Adequacy of response measures Within local planning Exceeds local capacity but within greater response capacity Exceeds all planning and capacity - chaos Command Structure Normal Hierarchy Incident Command System Coordination between disparate formal and informal organizations Organizational emergence Only established organizations Established and auxiliary organizations Established, auxiliary, mutual aid and emergent organizations mobilized Volunteers Not Needed Only Auxiliary Volunteers Auxiliary and Convergent Volunteers, Emergent Response Organizations Scope Only part of single community and jurisdiction affected Single community and jurisdiction affected Multiple communities and jurisdictions affected Duration Hours-weeks Weeks-months Months-years
    4. 4. Triage Centers & Staff Reunification
    5. 5. City Population Households Dogs Cats Birds Horses Other Total Antioch 101,049 37.846 21,951 24,978 3,785 1,892 4,050 56,656 Brentwood 40,912 15,323 8,887 10,113 1,532 766 1,640 22,938 Clayton 10,982 4,113 2,386 2,715 411 206 440 6,157 Concord 124,798 46,741 27,110 30,849 4,674 2,337 5,001 69,971 Danville 42,809 16,033 9,299 10,582 1,603 802 1,716 24,002 El Cerrito 23,407 8,767 5,085 5,786 877 438 938 13,124 Hercules 23,360 8,749 5,074 5,774 875 437 936 13,097 Lafayette 24,317 9,107 5,282 6,011 911 455 975 13,634 Martinez 36,818 13,790 7,998 9,101 1,379 689 1,475 20,643 Moraga 16,435 6,155 3,570 4,063 616 308 659 9,215 Oakley 28,265 10,586 6,140 6,987 1,059 529 1,133 15,847 Orinda 17,797 6,666 3,866 4,399 667 333 713 9,978 Pinole 19,604 7,342 4,259 4,846 734 367 786 10,991 Pittsburg 62,605 23,448 13,600 15,475 2,345 1,172 2,509 35,101 Pleasant Hill 33,638 12,599 7,307 8,315 1,260 630 1,348 18,860 Richmond 103,012 38,581 22,377 25,464 3,858 1,929 4,128 57,756 San Pablo 31,344 11,739 6,809 7,748 1,174 587 1,256 17,574 San Ramon 51,027 19,111 11,085 12,613 1,911 956 2,045 28,610 Walnut Creek 66,501 24,907 14,446 16,438 2,491 1,245 2,665 37,285 Unincorporated 161,574 60,582 35,138 39,984 6,058 3,029 6.482 90,691 Total 1,020,434 382,185 221,667 252,242 38,219 19,019 40,894 572,131
    6. 6. <ul><li>… “ any person registered with an accredited Disaster Council for the purpose of engaging in disaster service without pay or other considerations.” </li></ul><ul><li>Registered Disaster Service Worker volunteers are persons who have chosen to volunteer their time to assist a disaster or emergency services agency in carrying out the responsibility of that agency. </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Workers Compensation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited Immunity </li></ul></ul>Although DSW technically has nothing to do with CERT, CERT members who are sworn in by a Disaster Council receive extra protection from the State of California
    7. 7. <ul><li>Emergency Services Act provides DSWV with limited immunity from liability… </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Public Law 105-19, Volunteer Protection Act of 1997, also provides limited protection. </li></ul><ul><li>Immunity from liability protects the DSWV in any civil litigation resulting from acts of good faith made by the DSWV, while providing disaster service (e.g., damage or destruction of property; injury or death of an individual). </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>No workers’ compensation benefit or reimbursement of expenses incurred may be paid to any Disaster Service Worker Volunteer unless the loyalty oath has been taken or subscribed to. </li></ul><ul><li>The oath is to be administered only by an officer authorized to administer oaths. </li></ul><ul><li>Officers are authorized to administer the oath in the field, making any convergent volunteer a Disaster Service Worker Volunteer. </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>All registered Disaster Service Worker Volunteers wait for activation by their supervising authority before carrying out volunteer work. </li></ul><ul><li>Official activation ensures the DSW Volunteer the benefits and protections of the Disaster Service Worker Volunteer Program. </li></ul><ul><li>Activation of Disaster Service Worker Volunteers should be documented. </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>State-Wide in California </li></ul><ul><li>Result of 1991 Oakland Hills Fire </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporates the use of the Incident Command System (ICS) </li></ul><ul><li>Required when multiple jurisdictions or agencies respond </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD-5), February 2003. </li></ul><ul><li>HSPD-5 called for a National Incident Management System (NIMS) and identified steps for improved coordination of Federal, State, local, and private industry response to incidents and described the way these agencies will prepare for such a response. </li></ul><ul><li>The Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security announced the establishment of NIMS in March 2004. One of the key features is the Incident Command System (ICS). </li></ul>NIMS is the federal version of SEMS
    12. 12. <ul><li>The ICS is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Proven: result of decades of lessons learned in organization and management of emergency incidents. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tested: more than 30 years of emergency and non-emergency applications, by all levels of government and in the private sector. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NIMS requires the use of ICS for all domestic responses and is a condition for receiving Federal preparedness funding. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Invented in California: </li></ul><ul><li>ICS </li></ul><ul><li>CERT </li></ul><ul><li>SEMS (NIMS) </li></ul><ul><li>DART </li></ul>
    13. 14. <ul><li>While Frans Hoffman, the author of this training course, provides the information in this presentation for free (as hand-outs) to anyone who attends a Disaster Animal Response Training (DART), he and his licensors retain copyright on all text and graphic images. </li></ul><ul><li>Text and graphic images are protected by worldwide copyright laws and treaty provisions. This means that YOU MAY NOT copy, reproduce, modify, publish, upload, post, or include this information in your training or documents, reuse the text or graphics, transmit or distribute the text or graphics to others without the express written permission of the author. The author reserves all other rights. Except as expressly provided herein, he does not grant any express or implied right to you under any patents, copyrights, trademarks or trade secret information. </li></ul><ul><li>The DART logo is a service mark of Frans Hoffman. </li></ul><ul><li>For more information on how to legally use these materials, please contact Frans Hoffman at fhoffman@iRescue.us. </li></ul>

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