Workspace design

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5 questions about workspace design. Research included.


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Workspace design

  1. 1. Workspace design
  2. 2. Question # 1 How can we find out what users need? Question # 2 How can we create quiet workspaces? Question # 3 How open do you want your workspace to be? Question # 4 How can we transform public spaces such as stairs, hallways, sidewalks, and parking lots into useful work spaces? Question # 5 How can we create playful workspaces?
  3. 3. Question # 1 How can we find out what users need?
  4. 4. People want to work across a variety of geographic locations and digital platforms. They want to be able to choose from different workspaces and want to sign into those workspaces that best satisfy needs they have, for example regarding 1. event possibilities, 2. furniture and lighting, 3. availability of quiet spaces. Adapted from http://www.cmswire.com/social-business/its-time-to-reinvent-your-office-space-for-the-digital-age/
  5. 5. There is a move away from flat, white corporate spaces to more vibrant, blended office designs that mix in residential, academic and hospitality elements. Co-working space will evolve to provide a multitude of options tailored to work styles and industries. The corporate office will be designed to become an experience center. http://www.hok.com/about/news/2016/07/20/hoks-curtis-knapp-and-kay-sargent-discuss-top-trends-in-workplace-design/
  6. 6. Listen, listen, listen. There is no better way to getting to the heart of a client and knowing what they want. http://freshome.com/why-a-class-in-communications-is-a-must-for-architects/
  7. 7. Before changing a space, companies must have an understanding of what they’re trying to achieve. What behaviour do we want? What values are important for us? http://hbr.org/2014/10/workspaces-that-move-people/ar/3
  8. 8. The client hires you, so the client is the priority. But you can’t just build a building based on what the clients say, because their vision is based on what’s normal. How do you get out of the normal? You’ve got to question everything. http://hbr.org/2011/11/frank-gehry/ar/1 Frank O. Gehry
  9. 9. Further inspiration https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Needs-that-people-have-1530997 https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Questions-to-discover-your-values-1329394
  10. 10. Question # 2 How can we create quiet workspaces?
  11. 11. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Quiet-workspaces-2701098
  12. 12. Question # 3 How open do you want your workspace to be?
  13. 13. Flexible seating Good working space for extroverted people Assigned seating Good working space for introverted people Private offices Open plan offices http://hbr.org/2014/10/workspaces-that-move-people/ar/3
  14. 14. 1 2 3 4 5 People cannot see my computer screen. People cannot see my personal photos. I can block out my neighbour’s phone conversations. I can minimize exposure to flickering fluorescent lights. http://hbr.org/2014/10/balancing-we-and-me-the-best-collaborative-spaces-also-support-solitude/ar/2 1 = not important at all. 5 = very important.
  15. 15. 1 2 3 4 5 I can turn off instant messaging. I can shield my name from feedback to superiors. I can opt out of giving biometric data used for security purposes. http://hbr.org/2014/10/balancing-we-and-me-the-best-collaborative-spaces-also-support-solitude/ar/2 1 = not important at all. 5 = very important.
  16. 16. 1 2 3 4 5 I can avoid informing colleagues about my personal interests. I can avoid connecting with colleagues on social media. I can reduce interruptions by co-workers. I can avoid exposure to the noise and activity of others. http://hbr.org/2014/10/balancing-we-and-me-the-best-collaborative-spaces-also-support-solitude/ar/2 1 = not important at all. 5 = very important.
  17. 17. 1 2 3 4 5 There is a wall behind my work table. There is a wall beside my work table. Nobody is facing me when I am at my work table. I have a view to the outside from my work table. 1 = not important at all. 5 = very important. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/best-office-design-your-any-good-gretchen-rubin
  18. 18. Across industries, workplaces that prioritize both focus and collaboration score higher on measures of satisfaction, innovation, effectiveness, and performance. Gensler's 2013 Workplace survey http://www.archdaily.com/595033/when-one-size-does-not-fit-all-rethinking-the-open-office/
  19. 19. http://www.archdaily.com/595033/when-one-size-does-not-fit-all-rethinking-the-open-office/
  20. 20. Further inspiration https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Introvert-and-extrovert-2037536
  21. 21. Question # 4 How can we transform stairs, hallways, sidewalks, and parking lots into useful work spaces?
  22. 22. http://www.constructiondive.com/news/the-future-of-work-how-office-design-is-changing/415840/ In one workplace, Colliers took these 4 initiatives to make, for example, stairs more attractive workspaces: 1. They put in graphics and colours. 2. They made the doors to the stairs more obvious. 3. They added light. 4. They encouraged people to take the stairs, for example through challenges between departments.
  23. 23. The general idea is that any space is most efficient and lively when it's continuously in use. Examples of questions  How can hotel lobbies be used more?  How can restaurants be used more outside lunch and dinner times? http://www.fastcodesign.com/3060752/todays-workplace-is-a-stage-not-an-office
  24. 24. Question # 5 How can we create playful workspaces?
  25. 25. Example # 1 A play and learning environment for children
  26. 26. Curiosity Creativity Play Learning Values Activity Social
  27. 27. http://www.impactlab.net/ 2012/01/22/new-school- system-in-sweden-is- eliminating-classrooms- entirely/
  28. 28. http://news.tes.co.uk/b/news/2014/11/05/39-we-are-consulting-early-years-kids-on-what-they-think-of-their- education-39-reveals-finnish-education-minister.aspx Finnish educators asked 3-6 years old children to take photos of the places they hated and the places they loved. The kids loved all the things that related to games and being physically active; places where they can hide. They hated rooms that are for calming down.
  29. 29. Further inspiration https://www.pinterest.com/frankcalberg/playground-innovation/
  30. 30. Example # 2 Public spaces that stimulate exercise through fun
  31. 31. Movement Play Values
  32. 32. Bus stop http://big.dk/#projects-tryg
  33. 33. Road crossing http://big.dk/#projects-tryg
  34. 34. Example # 3 The dancing house
  35. 35. Activity Creativity Values Social
  36. 36. Dancing house. Prague, Czech Republic Sources http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Gehry http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/propertypicturegalleries/9313950 /Are-these-the-worlds-most-unusual-buildings.html
  37. 37. Example # 4
  38. 38. Creativity Values
  39. 39. http://www.businessinsider.com.au/google-dublin-office-photos-2013-6?op=1#another-spot-for-googlers-to-interact-24
  40. 40. Further inspiration http://www.destination-innovation.com/articles/if-you-want-more-creativity-give-your-office-more-fun https://www.flickr.com/photos/audreypenven/sets/72157617328268331/ http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/255498 http://www.newyorker.com/business/currency/the-open-office-trap http://www.pinterest.com/frankcalberg/outdoor-work-and-living-environments http://www.pinterest.com/frankcalberg/indoor-work-and-living-spaces https://youtu.be/usTz1_S_uOk http://youtu.be/2lXh2n0aPyw https://youtu.be/J5jwEyDaR-0

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