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Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism

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As a board-certified otolaryngologist, Dr. Frank Brettschneider treats a variety of disorders of the ear, nose, throat, head, and neck. Dr. Frank Brettscheider draws on an in-depth knowledge of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism

  1. 1. Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism Frank Brettschneider
  2. 2. Introduction • As a board-certified otolaryngologist, Dr. Frank Brettschneider treats a variety of disorders of the ear, nose, throat, head, and neck. Dr. Frank Brettscheider draws on an in-depth knowledge of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. The thyroid gland, located at the front of the neck, functions as a source of hormones that maintain balance in metabolic function. Therefore, when the thyroid malfunctions and secretes either too much or too little of the required hormones, the patient experiences either a substantial increase or a substantial decrease in metabolism. An under-functioning thyroid, known as hypothyroidism, slows the body's metabolism. A common congenital condition, it may also occur as a result of damage to the thyroid, inhibited hormone production, or acquired disease of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. Signs vary based on the patient's individual condition but can include fatigue, oversensitivity to cold, muscle discomfort, and weight gain.
  3. 3. Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism • Patients may also present with a variety of ancillary symptoms, such as dry skin and memory difficulties. Hyperthyroidism, by contrast, results from an excess of thyroid hormone in the body. Often a result of hormone overproduction, prompted by disease or an excess of iodide in the body, it may also develop from a specific form of thyroiditis or other cause of uncontrolled hormone release. Symptoms stem from an overstimulated metabolism and may range from heart palpitations and anxiety to insomnia and difficulty concentrating. Other signs include weight loss and menstrual irregularity.

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