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How Allergy Testing Works

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Dr. Frank Brettschneider has been president of Port Huron Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) for more than 25 years. In that time, Dr. Frank Brettschneider has tested and treated many patients for a broad range of upper respiratory allergies.

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How Allergy Testing Works

  1. 1. How Allergy Testing Works Frank Brettschneider
  2. 2. Introduction  Dr. Frank Brettschneider has been president of Port Huron Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) for more than 25 years. In that time, Dr. Frank Brettschneider has tested and treated many patients for a broad range of upper respiratory allergies. Skin allergy testing operates under the principle that contact with a particular allergen will garner a response. Testing typically takes one of two forms, both of which require the preparation of the allergy in a solution. The medical team may prepare several different solutions if a physician wishes to test a number of different allergens.
  3. 3. Allergy Testing  Many patients undergo what is known as a skin prick test, in which a medical professional places a drop of each prepared solution on the patient's forearm or back. The professional then pricks or scratches the skin with a needle, so that the solution can flow into the skin. If the patient is allergic to a tested allergen, a raised red spot will appear where that particular allergen came into contact with the needle prick. If a particular solution does not cause a response but contains a compound that remains a suspected allergen, the physician may perform an intradermal test, which requires the patient to receive an injection of the solution. This type of allergen introduction is more likely to generate a response. Physicians must be cautious in interpretation, however, as intradermal testing more often leads to false positives.

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