Finnish lessons

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A book byPasi Sahhlberg on what makes the Finnish education system work so well at turning out some of the best students in the world. Maybe Malaysia has something to learn here. Spread the word, especially to future education minister.

Finnish lessons

  1. 1. FINNISH LESSONS Why are Finnish Students so Smart?Pasi Sahlberg, PhDDirector GeneralCIMO (Ministry of Education)Helsinki11 July 2011AFT TEACH Conference 2011Washington, DC www.pasisahlberg.com
  2. 2. What is Finland?
  3. 3. 20101790 Between the West and the East
  4. 4. Education in Finland
  5. 5. Education system performance overtime in Finland and developed nations Learning, Participation, Equity, and Efficiency 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
  6. 6. Education system in 2011 5 4 23+ 3 22 Universities Polytechnics 2 21 1 60% 20 Specialist Work vocational experience qualifications 3 General Vocational school 19 2 upper secondary Apprenticeship 18 Further school training 1 17 vocational qualificationsGrades 10 Age 55% 40% 16 9 Compulsory schooling Work experience Basic school 1 7 Preschool 6
  7. 7. The Finnish Way 1: Less is Better
  8. 8. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 United States Mexico New Zealand Hours per year Scotland Australia Russian Federation Germany Portugal Netherlands Ireland England Spain Belgium (Fl.) Slovenia Iceland Belgium (Fr.) Norway Denmark France Czech Republic Middle School Teachers Luxembourg Estonia Korea Finnish teachers teach less… Hungary Austria Net contact time in hours per year in public institutions Japan Italy Israel Finland Poland GreeceOECD 2010
  9. 9. …at all levels of schooling High school United States OECD averageJunior high school Finland Primary school 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Hours per year
  10. 10. Finnish pupils study less9000 Total compulsory instruction hours between 7 and 14 year-olds800070006000 Ages 12-1450004000 Ages 9-11300020001000 Ages 7-8 0 Sweden Korea Norway Germany Greece Japan Austria Denmark OECD average Portugal Belgium Spain Ireland England France Mexico Italy Australia Netherlands Finland OECD 2010
  11. 11. Student achievement costs less 580 Finland 560 540 Canada JapanPISA science score in 2006 Korea Australia Netherlands 520 United Kingdom Germany Austria Switzerland Belgium Ireland Sweden 500 Denmark France Spain Norway United States 480 Italy Portugal Greece 460 50,000   55,000   60,000   65,000   70,000   75,000   80,000   85,000   90,000   95,000   100,000   Cumulative cost per student in USD (2006) OECD 2010
  12. 12. The Finnish Way 2:Test Less, Learn More
  13. 13. Finnish Students are Tested LessNational averages of 15-year-old students learning outcomes in mathematics 2000-06560540520 2000 2003 2006500480460 USA UK Canada Australia Japan New Zealand Ireland Finland OECD 2001-2007
  14. 14. Finnish students are good in social studies, too 8th Grade Students Civic Knowledge in 2009 Finland Denmark Korea Sweden Poland Ireland Italy Switzerland Estonia United Kingdom New Zealand Norway Belgium Spain Austria Chile Greece Luxemburg Mexico 400 450 500 550 600 ICCS 2010
  15. 15. Finnish schools differ less Variation in student performance in reading (2009) OECD  average  42%   Performance differences between schools Finland  7.7%  Performance variation of students within schools
  16. 16. The Finnish Way 3:Teaching is a Dream Job
  17. 17. Applicants to primary school teacher education 2001-10 7000 6000 Male 5000 4000 Female 3000 Admission: 1st Phase 2nd Phase 3rd Phase - high school merits - exam - interview - other merits 2000 1000 7000 2000 660 Accepted 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
  18. 18. Teacher salaries relative to workers with college degree 1.4 1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 Admission: 1st Phase 2nd Phase 3rd Phase - high school merits - exam - interview 0.2 - other merits 0 OECD 2010
  19. 19. Teacher career salary developmentAnnual statutory salaries in USD (PPP) 60000 Start Mid End 50000 40000 30000 20000 Admission: 1st Phase 2nd Phase 3rd Phase - high school merits - exam - interview - other merits 10000 0 Finland OECD USA OECD 2010
  20. 20. What can we learn from Finland?
  21. 21. GlobalEducational FinnishReformMovement WayForeword by Andy Hargreaves
  22. 22. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XCore subjects Holistic learning
  23. 23. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XStandardisation Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Personalisation
  24. 24. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XCompetition Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Collaboration
  25. 25. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XChoice Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Equity
  26. 26. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XTechnology Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Pedagogy
  27. 27. Global Educational Finnish Reform Movement Way XControl Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Trust
  28. 28. Advance Praise: "The story of Finlands extraordinary educational reforms is one that should inform policymakers and educators around the world. No one tells this story more clearly and engagingly than Pasi Sahlberg, who has lived and studied these reforms for decades. This book is a must read.” —Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education and Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education at Stanford University “A terrific synthesis by a native Finn, a teacher, a researcher and a policy analyst all rolled up into one excellent writer. Pasi Sahlberg teaches us a great deal about what we need to know before engaging in national educational reforms.” —David Berliner, Regents Professor in the College Of Education at Arizona State University ”Pasi Sahlberg is the best education policy expert to share the Finnish experiences with the international community. I have known him for decades and this book confirms that he is not only a practitioner but also a visionary that we Finns need when searching for the solutions to our educational challenges.” —Erkki Aho, Director General (1973 – 1991), Finnish National Board of Education "This book is a wake-up call for the U.S. Finland went from mediocre academic results to one of the top performers in the world. And, they did it with minimal testing, teacher unions, national collaboration, and elevating teaching to a high-status calling. This is the antidote to the NCLB paralysis." —Henry M. Levin, William Heard Kilpatrick Professor of Foreword by Andy Hargreaves Economics and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University and David Jacks Professor of Education and Economics, Emeritus Stanford UniversityAvailable October 2011, Paperback, $34.95 ISBN: 978-0-8077-5257-9 Thank You!

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