Engaging school leaders in the
Diocese of Broken Bay with the
NSW SYLLABUS for the
Australian curriculum
English K-6
May 20
The structure and many of the
features of the current English
syllabus have been retained,
including: objectives and outco...
A table of objectives and outcomes identifies the sequence of
knowledge, understanding and skills from Kindergarten to Yea...
Kindergarten – Year 6
SIMILARITIES
Students will continue to:
• be actively engaged in the development of skills
through
s...
DIFFERENCES
•An increased emphasis on the teaching of
literature through clearly defined content and text
requirements.
•C...
Make
meaning
through
language
Objectives
Responding and composing
In the English K–10 Syllabus, the study of
English is an active pursuit where students use
langua...
'Responding' is the activity that occurs as students
read, listen to or view texts. It encompasses the
personal and intell...
In this syllabus, 'composing' is the activity that occurs
as students produce written, spoken or visual texts.
Composing t...
As students undertake the key processes of responding to and
composing texts in their study of English, they undertake a n...
In addition to the key processes of responding and
composing, these processes include:
•engaging personally with texts
•de...
Use of terminology
The generic terms 'composer' and 'compose' can be
used in preference to 'author' and 'create' as used i...
Learning across the curriculum content, including
the cross-curriculum priorities and general
capabilities, assists studen...
Task:
In pairs-
• Choose one of the Learning across the curriculum areas
• Read the paragraph that explains it. (pp.27-30)...
Stage Statements
p.18-21
Task:
Read 2 consecutive stage statements.
Discuss:
• How does the language change between the tw...
Outcome coding p.11
Read this page.
Go to a content page in the syllabus.
‘Decode’ the outcome.
‘Decode’ the Australian cu...
Table of objectives and outcomes – continuum
of learning
Syllabus p 16-17
Place the objectives, A,B, C, D and E onto the
h...
Choose 1 ‘row’ of outcomes and read across.
What content or skill does this outcome relate
to?
How does the language chang...
The content of the syllabus has 10 ‘modes and skills’
areas:
Speaking and Listening
Reading and Viewing
Writing and Repres...
Use the large laminated sheets with the
‘modes and skills’
‘Plot’ onto the sheets the outcomes that
match the modes and sk...
Content p. 24
“The content describes in more detail how the
outcomes are to be interpreted and used, and the
intended lear...
Choose 1 mode or skill area for 1 stage.
Read the content intentions for the mode or skill
Using the ENGLISH block guideli...
Discuss what you heard and learnt.
Which modes and skills did the lesson cover?
Which outcomes were covered?
Task: Shared ...
Diocesan Literacy Statement
DEC K-6 Literacy continuum
Literacy for leaders training
Observation survey training
Best Star...
References and Support
The Board of Studies has developed a range of resources to support implementation of
the new Englis...
Board of Studies support
Many existing resources will continue to be
useful and relevant. Online, the English K–10
Syllabu...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•com...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•dem...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•com...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•dem...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•dem...
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•discusses how language is used to achieve a
widening range of purposes for a widening
range o...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
•produces most lower case
and up...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•thi...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•res...
Early Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 1
outcomes
A student:
Stage 2
outcomes
A student:
Stage 3
outcomes
A student:
•dem...
Early Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3
•Speaking and listening
1
•Speaking and listening
1
•Speaking and listening
1
•Speak...
•Grammar,
punctuation and
vocabulary
•Grammar,
punctuation and
vocabulary
•Grammar,
punctuation and
vocabulary
•Grammar,
p...
20 may english
20 may english
20 may english
20 may english
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20 may english

  1. 1. Engaging school leaders in the Diocese of Broken Bay with the NSW SYLLABUS for the Australian curriculum English K-6 May 20
  2. 2. The structure and many of the features of the current English syllabus have been retained, including: objectives and outcomes and content organised in stages from Early Stage 1 to Stage 5. Session 1- some essentials
  3. 3. A table of objectives and outcomes identifies the sequence of knowledge, understanding and skills from Kindergarten to Year 10. Foundation statements are replaced by stage statements that summarise the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that students develop as they achieve the outcomes in K–10. Learning across the curriculum areas include cross-curriculum priorities, general capabilities and other important learning for all students. These 13 areas are incorporated in the content of each syllabus and identified by icons. Teachers may identify additional opportunities for students to learn about these areas. There is a hyperlinked subject-specific glossary for the English K–10 Syllabus. What is new?
  4. 4. Kindergarten – Year 6 SIMILARITIES Students will continue to: • be actively engaged in the development of skills through speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing and representing • engage with a variety of different types of texts for different purposes and different audiences • acquire skills of English as an EAL student through explicit teaching and links to the ESL scales • develop the range of skills required to be literate through explicit teaching, a clear continuum of learning and using a variety of strategies.
  5. 5. DIFFERENCES •An increased emphasis on the teaching of literature through clearly defined content and text requirements. •Content is reorganised in a K–10 continuum, which clearly defines processes and skill development. This includes the explicit teaching of contextual knowledge, comprehension, and thinking and reflecting skills and processes. •The K–10 continuum has been developed to demonstrate a clear pathway of learning in English. •The text requirements include experience of contexts, such as intercultural experiences, Aboriginal histories and cultures, Asian perspectives and environmental sustainability.
  6. 6. Make meaning through language Objectives
  7. 7. Responding and composing In the English K–10 Syllabus, the study of English is an active pursuit where students use language to learn about language. The key processes of responding to and composing texts are central to students using language purposefully and meaningfully and engaging with a wide range of texts.
  8. 8. 'Responding' is the activity that occurs as students read, listen to or view texts. It encompasses the personal and intellectual connection a student makes with texts. It also recognises that students and the texts to which they respond reflect social contexts. Responding typically involves: •shaping and arranging textual elements to explore and express ideas, emotions and values •identifying, comprehending, selecting, articulating, ima gining, critically analysing and evaluating.
  9. 9. In this syllabus, 'composing' is the activity that occurs as students produce written, spoken or visual texts. Composing typically involves: •shaping, making and arranging textual elements to explore and express ideas, emotions and values •processes of imagining, drafting, appraising, reflecting and refining •knowledge, understanding and use of the language forms, features and structures of texts.
  10. 10. As students undertake the key processes of responding to and composing texts in their study of English, they undertake a number of other integrated and concurrent processes which also highlight the importance of students as active users and learners of language. The processes in this syllabus are intended to emphasise student agency through students developing and applying knowledge and understanding of context and language forms and features, and reflecting on their learning.
  11. 11. In addition to the key processes of responding and composing, these processes include: •engaging personally with texts •developing and applying contextual knowledge •understanding and applying knowledge of language forms and features. The key processes also help to organise and emphasise content in this syllabus within and across stages of learning.
  12. 12. Use of terminology The generic terms 'composer' and 'compose' can be used in preference to 'author' and 'create' as used in the Australian curriculum. The use of the terms 'composer' and 'compose' does not preclude use of specific nomenclature such as 'poet', 'writer', 'novelist' or 'playwright' by teachers and students where appropriate.
  13. 13. Learning across the curriculum content, including the cross-curriculum priorities and general capabilities, assists students to achieve the broad learning outcomes defined in the Board of Studies K–10 Curriculum Framework and Statement of Equity Principles, and in the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (December 2008). Learning across the curriculum. P.12
  14. 14. Task: In pairs- • Choose one of the Learning across the curriculum areas • Read the paragraph that explains it. (pp.27-30) • Look through the content area of the syllabus, find the icon and discuss how this priority or capability has been embedded in the content of the syllabus. • What did you notice about the icons and their use while looking in the content pages?
  15. 15. Stage Statements p.18-21 Task: Read 2 consecutive stage statements. Discuss: • How does the language change between the two? • How could teachers use these statements?
  16. 16. Outcome coding p.11 Read this page. Go to a content page in the syllabus. ‘Decode’ the outcome. ‘Decode’ the Australian curriculum reference. What do you notice? Session 2: Outcomes- Continuum of Learning.
  17. 17. Table of objectives and outcomes – continuum of learning Syllabus p 16-17 Place the objectives, A,B, C, D and E onto the hard copy diagram of ‘organisation of content’.
  18. 18. Choose 1 ‘row’ of outcomes and read across. What content or skill does this outcome relate to? How does the language change from ES1 to Stg 4? What implications does this have for classroom learning? What do you notice about the stage 3 and stage 4 outcomes? What does this imply for stg 3 and 4 learning? Task:
  19. 19. The content of the syllabus has 10 ‘modes and skills’ areas: Speaking and Listening Reading and Viewing Writing and Representing Grammar, Punctuation and Vocabulary Spelling Responding and composing (stg 3) Handwriting and using digital technologies Thinking imaginatively and creatively Expressing themselves Reflecting on learning Modes and Skills:
  20. 20. Use the large laminated sheets with the ‘modes and skills’ ‘Plot’ onto the sheets the outcomes that match the modes and skills. You will need to access the content pages for each stage. (p.31-121) What do you notice? What are the implications for developing teachers’ understanding? Task:
  21. 21. Content p. 24 “The content describes in more detail how the outcomes are to be interpreted and used, and the intended learning appropriate for the stage. In considering the intended learning, teachers will make decisions about the sequence, the emphasis to be given to particular areas of content, and any adjustments required based on the needs, interests and abilities of their students.” Session 3: Application of content
  22. 22. Choose 1 mode or skill area for 1 stage. Read the content intentions for the mode or skill Using the ENGLISH block guidelines plan where and what could be taught to meet some of these intentions. Discuss with a partner. Try another mode or skill in a different stage. Task
  23. 23. Discuss what you heard and learnt. Which modes and skills did the lesson cover? Which outcomes were covered? Task: Shared Text lesson
  24. 24. Diocesan Literacy Statement DEC K-6 Literacy continuum Literacy for leaders training Observation survey training Best Start training Differentiation for gifted and high ability students and for students of English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D) New scheme, returning and casual teacher training Links to other system learning
  25. 25. References and Support The Board of Studies has developed a range of resources to support implementation of the new English K–10 Syllabus: Parents' Guide Schools' Guides Assessment advice and strategies Programming advice and samples Program Builder Also there are many existing professional organisations and sites developing resources to support the new curriculum: ALEA support resources for the Aust. curriculum. Scootle (you will need your CNN password) Splash ABC The Literacy Shed At the CSO we will act as the filter for the new resources and inform you of new sites and resources.
  26. 26. Board of Studies support Many existing resources will continue to be useful and relevant. Online, the English K–10 Syllabus can be viewed by stage, outcomes and content.
  27. 27. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction •ENe-1A •communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations •EN1-1A •communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts •EN2-1A •communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features •EN3-1A •recognises that there are different kinds of spoken texts with specific language features and shows an emerging awareness of some purposes for spoken language •ENe-6B •recognises a range of purposes and audiences for spoken language and recognises organisational patterns and features of predictable spoken texts •EN1-6B •identifies the effect of purpose and audience on spoken texts, distinguishes between different forms of English and identifies organisational patterns and features •EN2-6B Speaking and listening (communicating)
  28. 28. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies •ENe-4A •draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies •EN1-4A •uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies •EN2-4A •uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies •EN3-3A •demonstrates emerging skills and knowledge of texts to read and view, and shows developing awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter •ENe-8B •recognises that there are different kinds of texts when reading and viewing and shows an awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter •EN1-8B •identifies and compares different kinds of texts when reading and viewing and shows an understanding of purpose, audience and subject matter •EN2-8B Reading and viewing
  29. 29. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •composes simple texts to convey an idea or message •ENe-2A •plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers •EN1-2A •plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language •EN2-2A •composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts •EN3-2A •recognises some different purposes for writing and that own texts differ in various ways •ENe-7B •identifies how language use in their own writing differs according to their purpose, audience and subject matter •EN1-7B •identifies and uses language forms and features in their own writing appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts •EN2-7B Writing and representing
  30. 30. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts •ENe-9B •uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts •EN1-9B •uses effective and accurate sentence structure, grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary relevant to the type of text when responding to and composing texts •EN2-9B •uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies •EN3-6B Grammar, punctuation and vocabulary
  31. 31. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •demonstrates developing skills in using letters, simple sound blends and some sight words to represent known words when spelling •ENe-5A •uses a variety of strategies, including knowledge of sight words and letter–sound correspondences, to spell familiar words •EN1-5A •uses a range of strategies, including knowledge of letter– sound correspondences and common letter patterns, to spell familiar and some unfamiliar words •EN2-5A •draws on appropriate strategies to accurately spell familiar and unfamiliar words when composing texts •EN3-4A Spelling
  32. 32. Stage 3 outcomes A student: •discusses how language is used to achieve a widening range of purposes for a widening range of audiences and contexts •EN3-5B Responding and Composing
  33. 33. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: •produces most lower case and upper case letters and uses digital technologies to construct texts •ENe-3A •composes texts using letters of consistent size and slope and uses digital technologies •EN1-3A •uses effective handwriting and publishes texts using digital technologies •EN2-3A Handwriting and using digital technologies
  34. 34. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts •ENe-10C •thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts •EN1-10C •thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts •EN2-10C •thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts •EN3 Thinking imaginatively and creatively
  35. 35. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences •ENe-11D •responds to and composes a range of texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences •EN1-11D •responds to and composes a range of texts that express viewpoints of the world similar to and different from their own •EN2-11D •identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts •EN3-8D Expressing themselves
  36. 36. Early Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 1 outcomes A student: Stage 2 outcomes A student: Stage 3 outcomes A student: •demonstrates awareness of how to reflect on aspects of their own and others’ learning •ENe-12E •identifies and discusses aspects of their own and others’ learning •EN1-12E •recognises and uses an increasing range of strategies to reflect on their own and others’ learning •EN2-12E •recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner •EN3-9E Reflecting on learning
  37. 37. Early Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 •Speaking and listening 1 •Speaking and listening 1 •Speaking and listening 1 •Speaking and listening •Writing and representing 1 •Writing and representing 1 •Writing and representing 1 •Writing and representing •Handwriting and using digital technologies •Handwriting and using digital technologies •Handwriting and using digital technologies •Reading and viewing 1 •Reading and viewing 1 •Reading and viewing 1 •Reading and viewing •Spelling •Spelling •Spelling •Spelling •Speaking and listening 2 •Speaking and listening 2 •Speaking and listening 2 •Responding and composing •Writing and representing 2 •Writing and representing 2 •Writing and representing 2 •Reading and viewing 2 •Reading and viewing 2 •Reading and viewing 2
  38. 38. •Grammar, punctuation and vocabulary •Grammar, punctuation and vocabulary •Grammar, punctuation and vocabulary •Grammar, punctuation and vocabulary •Thinking imaginatively and creatively •Thinking imaginatively and creatively •Thinking imaginatively, creatively and interpretively •Thinking imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically •Expressing themselves •Expressing themselves •Expressing themselves •Expressing themselves •Reflecting on learning •Reflecting on learning •Reflecting on learning •Reflecting on learning

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