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THENEW CHURCH REPOSITORY,                             AKD         MONTHLY REVIEW.             DEVOTED TO THE EXPOSITION  P...
: .... : .. :                              .:.. .. . : .:.              .. : ..               ........               tJ.  ...
INDBX.                                     ORIGINAL PAPERS. &0.bDUSS TO SuBecmm1lU,          •          •       •        •...
iT                                      lfUlez.                                                                           ...
THE NEW CHURCH REPOSITORY                                  ABD                  MON1HLY R.EVIEW..1. D.                    ...
8                        Addre•• to 8u1m:riber,.                    [Jan. certain AeatJinea. in our pages from a dispropor...
Addrea,   0 8u1J1criber••                  7wit~  the genuine sense of Scripture than those of the Calvinistic orWestminis...
8                                                                 lJan.have bethooght ourselves of a method of still accom...
1849.]                  .Addre" to S"blCtwr,.                       8   May we Dot then hope for the requisite measure of ...
10         The Force, tmd TeIUlmcie. of Nature.               lJan.                            A.R.TICLE 11.            TH...
1MB.]           ne Fore,. and ~mdmcie, of Nature.                     11       3. A spiritual SOD, representative of the L...
12            ne. Forcu and TlfldMciu of Nature.                  [Jan.impressions upon our senses. Berzelius declares tha...
1Nl.]           n. Force, ad T~·ofNalMre.                              18     Id Prop. Philoeophers speak of Heat, Light, ...
14                                                                   [JaD.    ThUll, by the process of exclusion, we have ...
1848.]                                                              16Jive miles, ODly l-8QOth of the distance to its ·cen...
If}                                                              [Jan. vout, progressive, creative Man-who has laden the o...
1848.]        ne Forou and Tendenciu of Nature.                        17  purposes. The development and growth of living ...
18                                                                        [Jan.  et&:tive MICe, vital principle, &~., and ...
1841.]     I"terpolation ita •      DietioratJ,., Dj   C~,.                           1_     Here evidently is nothing tou...
- · o f tJ nppotMfl                              [J...    terpolation in the Dictionary of Correspondences. I would ask up...
IN.)                                                                            SIfoUowing j l For when mention is made in...
•                                                                           [Ju.....els themselves; for they desire, like ...
1841.]  It is still to be bome in mind that these vicissitudes originate with the an-                                     ...
(Jan.authentic. The New Churchman has small hesitation on this score;with others the testimony of our enlightened Seer wil...
1848·1                                                                16 1783, vol. 6, London edition;- and after havitlg ...
[Jan. fame and power, greater than that of Mr. Weeley to contend with every surrounding sect (or apiritual nation) which d...
1849·1raJe in oontroversy, we are to take DO authorities at second hand."-p. 45.   Now, sir, you are doubtless ready with ...
[Jail.   of genuine truth, from the heavenly doc";au of the fiew Jerusalem,   break in upon their souls.      When Mr. Wes...
1MB.]                                                                    •&ion ; • This is wrong; it is BOt the· meaning o...
10                                                                [JaILaDy order or introduction, modesty or mercy, he den...
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The new church_repository_and_monthly_re_vol_ii_1849

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Emanuel Swedenborg

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The new church_repository_and_monthly_re_vol_ii_1849

  1. 1. THENEW CHURCH REPOSITORY, AKD MONTHLY REVIEW. DEVOTED TO THE EXPOSITION PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY TAUGHT IN TUB wamK8I OP EMANUEL SWEDENBORG. OOKDUCTBD BY :::: ::::: :J- : : .... ~" .. : ~~ : :: . .. ", : .. VOL. D. : . ., : " .,. ~ NEW-YORK:PUBLISHED BY LEWIS C. BUSH, 16 HOWARD STREET. LOBJ)OI(: I • •• BOD8OIf AlfD w•• ".1. 1849.
  2. 2. : .... : .. : .:.. .. . : .:. .. : .. ........ tJ. r. Ps....... PriM", 8prue BINet, N. Y.
  3. 3. INDBX. ORIGINAL PAPERS. &0.bDUSS TO SuBecmm1lU, • • • • A" IArcan,,MiacorreetioD oC. 8UPpoeecl" UlOneoU. TraDal.dOD iD, .1Atonement, OD the, • • • • CWSIBiblical Expoeitionl, ". 18,181.301Bushnell, Rev. Dr., and Mr. Lord, • 141 - 4.Clowes, Rev. J., two Letters Crom, • • USCoDgeDtion, General, proposed Constitution in the,Dictionary or Correspondenoe, Interpolation in the, 18Earth. Creation and Duration oIthe, •!slay on the Human Form) 81 Cl OrpnizatiOD, • 1aForces and Tendencies of Nature, ,. 1tGriefs, Oratimde Cor, • • • 301Heaven, EtymolOlY of the term,. • US.How Societies in the New Church should be form,eel. 111Human Form, an ESI8Y OD the, 111Instructors oCtbe New Jerasalem, • ". • . 38Jewish Tabernacle, viewed in ita Spiritual Import, 119. t63, 311, 361,412, 4M, 611Letter, the, aod the Spirit, •Lord. Mt., and Rev. Dr. BllshDeU,.Medicine, Spiritual,. • • • 147,29~,343.391. 439,48,631 M., U.IOC Nature. Forces and Tendencies of, • 1tNew Christian Dispensation,. • iOI New Church, General Constitution oCthe, 471 OrganizatioD, an Essay OD,Priesthood Dot UniYereal, • • • O:~Plfchological Phenomena, • • •Queries, three, relative to certain Doctrines oC Swedenboll.Salvation, • • • •Second Advent, the Lords, the preeeDt the Epooh of, · " III 401 114, 1e., 191Sleep. Swedenborg O D . . • • seSoul-Experience, singular ph. . of. Spinoza and Swedenborg. • . 4. 4_ 481 Spirit aDd Matter, " extract Crom, •• Spiritual Diary, remark. OD a p....e in, • • U, MI Swedeoborg, Ariatode and the Antipodee, • 111 It his Interco11l88 iD the Spiritual World, 11 It on Sleep, .1 " c. .. and Spinoza, • • • three Qoeries relative to certain Doctrine. of, • vindication oC. from the Misrepreeencation. oC Wel1eyJ • 11 121 • le •• was his Mislion fOQDded 011 he moral DeceI8itiee oC dle Church and World? • . It Water as an Elementary Correspondence oC Truth, 111 U as a Correspondence of Trllth, 361 POETRY. Lines addreued to Rev. Dr. Been, 110 Ken and Flowen, Prayer from the Inner Life, To my Gaardiua Spirit, ••13 81 BOO][S NOTICED. Ban OIl the Mlni.try, • 88 BIllhDe11s Oocl iD Chrilt, . N
  4. 4. iT lfUlez. PAa•• C111101d. B.epJy to Remarks on Nobles Appeal, 194- • Crowea (Mrs.), Night Si l,) 01 Nature, • 235 Haddock! P8ych~j5lU alld SomnoUlm, • 336 Hardens Cbaracter ud Works o(Cbrl.-, HOIl,hs Judttment Day, • t .- 613 32 Hollands Review. aod E"lsay8,. • • 568 Joumeyman" (a), Benefic·roDce oCDesign in the CreadoD. • 196 Kidders PI1cholOlical Sy-tem Dl MediciDe, • • 433 Madelers &ience of Corr~~pODdence.elucidated, • 35 ;)torells PhilOlOphy of Religion,. • • • • 87 ~evlni Antichrist,. • • • • • • 233 1~)I·thts Lectures on Connection between BIblical and Physical History of Man. 380 Jtepon of Northe.rn ~diana A.sM)CiatioD, • . 81 :~Cha ~Ire of 8wedeD~Orr. • :581 8&1JiCTIONS. Mdr8lf of the Pre8byterian Synod of New-York to dae Israelites within their DlItriot, 521 JlIuahnell, Dr., arraigned and acquitted, • • • • 626 lo~w 1$.10 •• Rev. John, Letter from, 1 74- ~ Guys, Letters on Swedenbol"l. 2~ ~oerpta Miscellanea. No. 1. • 475 rEJtraets from Night side of Natare, • 2&0 ~utler QC Rev. John Clowu,. • •• 114 raeUt8S, Addre.. of the Preabyterian S)Jlod of Now-York co, • 521j etheri.an Gema. ~les~ • • eo:r.el, WolfpD., aDdSwedeDborg,. • ,Night side qC Nature, Extracts.Crom. • • • •• .•• •• . 98, 140, 113 141 430 2&0 JProgreal oC Religious Sentiment in HoDand. 115cMwedenborgt nea Guars Lettets OD, 223 ~. Wolfpng Menzel on, .• 141~ ~.tta OD Formation of Chriatian Churches, 428 MISCELLANY. iADimal Kingdom, Supplemeat to ·SwedeDboll8, • 43 b"rrett, Rev. B. F., visit to Loaiaville, Ky., • • 185 lOoraftaioD, General, Abstract ofthoProoeedinp .rthe thirty-first, • • 320(Correspondence, • • • 36, 94, 142, 119. 231. 994, 373. 416(,DBa Guayl, Le BoY and Dr. Tafe}, . . . . "1I JloctrinaJ Contrast. • • .-8t1P.ield, Rev. Geo., Letter from, . • •• 22-4:sIDdiana ASlOCiation,.Proceediap oC the 8even&h Annual meetiDg or, 144, 189 I.L8tter from Dr. Tarel, . • • _ • t29, 4~,"New Church Societiel, how they should be formed, 31e:" II It Reports of, • • • • • 316 tProceedings oC tile Seventh Anoual Meeting er the Northern Indiana AlIOOiatioD, 144, 189 P.ychologioal facti iUustratilll Swedenborss DootdDe of the Soul.. • 44iBepona oC New.Church Socieuee, • •• 3?tJ 8001etlel in the New Chult.h, how theylb01lld be formed, • 316 Soul, . .,.halotrical faotsUlllmating8wedeobor(a dooUine of. 44-, 8wedenborg, Supplement to hi. Animal Kingdom,. 43 "el, Dr., aod Le Boy. Des Guars, _ 41 U . Letter from, • 129, 43~ 100, 148, 197, 244. ~9, 385, 434, 482. 530, 58 OBITUARIBS. Beardaley, Kr.. Elizabeth, 390 Been, Rev. Lewia, 464 PaDer, Mr. Borace, • 390~Gamble, ltIn. Eliaabeth, • 160
  5. 5. THE NEW CHURCH REPOSITORY ABD MON1HLY R.EVIEW..1. D. J!lU1BI, 18jt. I •• I •. ADDRESS TO SUBSCRIBERS. APTEJl a delay which we have in vain strove to make shorter, thefirst No. of the second years issue of the N. C. Repository makes itsappearance. The causes to which the delay has been owing, andwhich threatened at one time to prevent the continuance of the workaltogether, have been happily removed, and the way is now clear forthe resumption of our enterprise under new and as we trust hope-ful auspices. The suspense in which our subscribers have been leftfor many weeks demands perhaps an apology; but as it was owingto causes which we could not control, we trust our friends "rill bebetter pleased with an expose bearing on the future than on thepast. It is our earnest wish to be enabled to continue the Repository, at least long enough to realise somewhat more fully our idea of what such a work might be made as an auxiliary to the cause of the New Church.. The general principles on which it was proposed, at theoutset, to conduct it, ,,"ill be still adhered to. We see DO occasion to depart from our progrttmme. It is still our design to make the N. C. R. t.he organ of free, independent, liberal discussion, in which Truth ~hall be the polar star-that Truth, however, which reognises vital alliance with Good. But while we propose to follow out our original plan in its leading features, ,ve shall not deem ourselves precluded from acting upon such hints, as to the improvement of the work, as experience or friendly criticism has suggested durin&, its progress thus far. The principal ground of complaint, we believe, hu been a Yo~ u. 1
  6. 6. 8 Addre•• to 8u1m:riber,. [Jan. certain AeatJinea. in our pages from a disproportionate number of long articles, and those, too, frequently of an abstruse and consequent- ly dry character. We are not sure that this objection is not well found- ed, although it is proper to remark that thorough-going and elabo- rate treatment of topics was from the first a decided feature of our un- dertaking ; and, moreover, that as the Edit()r could not furnish all thematter, he was obliged to make use of such as was offered him. Still I we" are satisfied that an important change for the better may be ef-fected in this particular, and we have therefore resolved to study such improvements in the choice and disposition of our matter asshall at least relieve the work from the charge of tedium. We wouldnot be understood, however, as promising to insert no extended orserial discussions, or to make our pages equally attractive to all classesof readers; this we cannot hope to accomplish; but .we shall stillhope to introduce such a grateful variety into our matter, originaland selected, that a wide range of readers shall find their tastes con-sulted. To tgive a more distinct intimation on this head, we submitthe following as an outline of the intended features which the Repos-itory is to wear in its future issues. 1. A thorough and searching analysis of the various doctrinaltenets of the Old Church, with an attempted exposure of their falla-cies as contrasted with the eminently scriptural and rational charac-ter of those of the New. 2. A larger admixture of scientific and iniscellaneous intelligence,designed to show how far the progress of discovery and the assertionof principles is <:ontributing illustration and confirmation to the veri-ties, philosophic, scientific, and psychological, of the New Church. 3. A more extensive correspondence, both forei~ and domestic,than we have yet been able to command, abounding with news-items of interest relative to the propagation of the heavenly doctrinesat home and abroad. 4. More copious notices of new publications, especially such asreflect, in any degree, the principles and tenden<ies of the New Dis-pensation, and display novel and interesting aspects of the generalmind of the age. In addition to the above, we are happy to be authorized to an-nounce a series of articles from the pen of Pro£ Taylor Lewis, of theN. Y. University, in reply to the" Letters to a Trinitarian," in whichhe proposes to controvert the positions oC the N. C. in regard to the doctrine of the Trinity, and to show bow much less accordant they are
  7. 7. Addrea, 0 8u1J1criber•• 7wit~ the genuine sense of Scripture than those of the Calvinistic orWestminister schools of Theology. Prof. Lewis has beeD awarefrom the outset that Ile was the gentleman to whom the "Lettersto a Trinitarian" were inflominally addressed, and has read themattentively as they have appeared. From his known ability as awriter on moral and biblical subjects, we may doubtless anticipateas strong a defence of the established dogma as it is susceptible of;and from his general character and his fliendly mlations with theEditor, we may safely count upon a candid and comteous mode ofconducting the argument. His reply ,,"ill be commenced in t11e se-cond or third number, subject, however, to our own remarks whencompleted. " We have yet another Dew feature to propose. or the sixty-fourpages of which each No. will consist, it is our purpose to appropri-ate the last sixteen, or one whole form, exclusively to translationsfrom such of Swedenborgs Latin works as have not yet been render-ed into English. This portion of the No. will be paged separately .from the rest, with a view to its being eventually collected togetherand bound by itsel£ The advantage of this plan is, that it securesthe publication of valuable portions of Swedenborg8 writings which would otherwise have no prospect" of being made accessible to the mere English reader. This is peculiarly the case in regard to the "Spiritual Diary," of which about one third of a volume was publish. ed in the Swedenborg Library, while the remainder has b~en suspend- ed for want of means to complete it, as no publisher in the New Church is in a condition to incur the least risk on this score. We design therefore to begin this department of our plan with the translation of the Diary, from the point where it was suspended in the fonner issue (No. 3963). In order, however, to avoid burdening subscribers with a broken volame, and to hold out some additional in- ducement to subscription, we proffer to every subscriber who is in- clined to favor this plan, to furnish him gratia with all the previous part of the volume 8lready printed, consisting of nine Nos. of 16 pages each, or 145 pages in all. These Nos. will be at once forward- ed by mail to every one who becomes responsible for a copy with this appendage added. The London New Chttrch Quarterly has adopted this plan in issuing with every No. a portion of the" Adver. saria" of Swedenborg, and thus gives itself a very attractive featore. As we are aware, however, that many New Churchmen have doubm as to the expediency of printing and circulating the Diary, we
  8. 8. 8 lJan.have bethooght ourselves of a method of still accomplishing an object80 near our heart as we confess the publication of the Diary to be.This is. to leave it optional to subscribers whether to take the Diary or not. In case of their declining, we will send forty-eight pages ofmatter instead of sixty.four, and charge two dollars subscription in-stead of three. They will in that case have precisely the sameamount of magazine matter as other subscribers, but will lack the ap-pended translation. While those who subscribe for the whole willhave virtually purchased for a dollar what iD. any other form wouldprobably cost them from two to three. This arrangement will make it necessary that each subscribershould distinctly state whether he desires the Repository with orwithout the Diary appended. It Win make some cODliderable differ-ence to us in the expense of printing, whether one orders the two IJrthree dollar copy, and as the annexed translation will be very valua-ble to New Churchmen, ,ve could fain hope that they would all pre-fer the latter. Still we shall aim to accommodate all parties. We have now laid open our plan to our readers. We are satisfiedthat materials exist for a New Church Journal of rich and varied in-terest, and of permanent value; and we believe too a demand is nowbeing made for the wufruct of these materials which has never occur-red before. We are also firm in the purpose of dedicating to it the bestenergies that we can command. The Editor has declined other fieldsof labor with a ,riew to devote himself mainly to this, and thus torender it leSs dependent upon foreign contribution, though stillanxious to receive, as before, the aid of co-Iaborers in the field. But we are compelled to declare ourselves wholly unable to pro-ce~d with the work without the support of at least our former list ofsubscribers.. From the difficulty of making a satisfactory publishingarrangement, we are compelled to assume the entire pes:uniary re-sponsibility of the enterprise. This we may perhaps the more safelydo as the considerable item of salary is of course subducted from ourexpenses. Relinquishing all hope on this head, and devoting our timeand labor without the least prospect of remuneration, we enter uponthe ,,"ork as a Work of use to the Church, in which we will gladlyspend and be spent if our friends ·and brethren will but see us safefrom actual loss. Our present subscription list, if the names can allbe retained and payment promptly made in advance, will carry ussafely through the year, though without the promise of a single dol- lar over the actual expeDBe&
  9. 9. 1849.] .Addre" to S"blCtwr,. 8 May we Dot then hope for the requisite measure of support , Doel not such 8 proffer of gratuitous service constitute some claim npon the sympathy and co-operation of those to whom the welfare of ourcause ought to be as dear as to ourselves 1 We venture to say then to our subscribers, "Give us trial for one year more. Hold on as sub-scribers; make prompt remittances; and if we do not give satisfactionin that time ve ,viII wave all future claims." Our strong hope, how-ever, is that in that time we shall succeed in giving the Repositorysuch a hold on the favor of its patrons that they will not need urging ,t-o keep it in existence. In consequence of the unavoidable delay above adverted to, we shallbe obliged to date backwards for two or three months, which we doin order to preserve the continuity of the work unbroken. Thecauses of this and all similar delays being now removed, our printerswill redouble their-efforts to expedite the publication of the Nos. nowdue, and to come abreast of the months. EverY exertion will be madeto have the issues regular and prompt on the first day, or at the lar-thest the first week, of each month. . Ve have only to say in conclusion, that as we are utterly destituteof any other resources with which to carry on the work, than suchas the work itself shall yield, and as our heaviest expendituresrequire payment in hand, we are under the necessity of a.sking imme-diate remittance on the part of subscribers, which may be addressedfor the present, to Lewis C. Bush, publisher, 136 Nassau Street, orto the Editor, at the same place. G. BUSH. P. S.-Mr. Wm. B. Hayden, whose various essays have enrichedour Nos. hitherto, has kindly proffered to associate his labors withours in contributing to the interest of the Repository. We tender, atthe same time, an earnest request for the contributions of our friendsat large, both those who have already done so much to give char-acter to our work and those who may be equally able to do it, butwho hitherto have not.
  10. 10. 10 The Force, tmd TeIUlmcie. of Nature. lJan. A.R.TICLE 11. THE FORCES AND TENDENCIES OF NATURE.. F.OM the pages of History we learn that Religion after Religionhas sunk into oblivion, as the advancement of knowledge prohibiteda longer imposition upon the credulity of mankind. A cOlIparison oftheoretic principles with the positive phenomena of nature must bethe touchstone of the truth of every system. Even the great Churchwwch rescued Europe from the hand of the barbarian, and which hastom down some altar of idolatry in almost every nation, exhibitsmanifest symptoms of approaching decay. Her advocates shrink withdistrust from the advancing strides ofGeology, Chemistry, Physiology,and Magnetism. Every new discovery lends its aid to refute somecherished theory or to call in question the rationality of some favoritedoctrine. • In every age there have been deep and bold thinkers, who, ac-knowledging only the supremacy of reasoD, have plunged into theabyss of Atheism rather than wear the.shackles of inexplicable dogmas.To such minds we earnestly appeal and declare that the marriagebetween Philosophy and Religion has at length been consummated.Systems of Religion have been founded upon the hopes, the fears, thepassions, and the ambition of man. Some have allured by the grantof sensual gratifications; others have attracted by the displays ofpompous ceremony. One has bewitched with venerable traditions,instinct with the poetry of romance; another has beguiled with theradiant charm of Idealism. But the massive pillars of natural sci-ence support the beautiful temple of the New Church Theology.Let gigantic mind, penetrate yet more deeply into the abstruse ques-tions of Mathematics. and Astronomy; let the ChelIililt experiment,the Anatomist dissect, the Physiologist investigate; let the Geologistrend the mountains and disembowel the earth in search of the gran-ite records of the worlds history; every earnest and successful in-vestigator of nature is a chosen workman, unconsciously strengthen-ing the deep and broad foundations of the New Jerusalem. We propose to consider the system of Swedenborg as an hypothesisfor the explanation of all phenomena, spiritual and natural; and tosee what support is afforded it by the more recent scientific discov-eries. . The Swedish philosopher lays down the following axioms as partof the fundamental principles of his system. 1. The Infinite Divine Love, which is spontaneously outtlowing or selt-communicative, is the end of creation, while the Infinite Divine Wisdom is its CQuae. ~. The object which the end contemplates, and in which it rests, isthe production of a being formed to reflect the image of his Creator, and to reciprocate the Love from which he originates. a
  11. 11. 1MB.] ne Fore,. and ~mdmcie, of Nature. 11 3. A spiritual SOD, representative of the Lord, is the proximate CtIUe, MlJdiu1II, or agency by which the creation is effected.I 4. This SUD, by successive outftowings of its own substance, created spiritual atmospheres, spiritual earths, spiritual forms, all having re-I ference to a perfect spiritual form, recipient of life from the Lord, and which, thus animated, constitutes the human soul. 5. The ultimate effect of creative power is to produce inert matter to serve as a perpetual basis to the spiritual superstructure.I 6. This inert matter is moulded into natural forms by spiritualI forces and thns everything n~tur81 corresponds to something spiritual. We thus tUftl11le an organiza.tion of the spiritual world, and contend that the organization of the natural ,vorld is similar and cbrrespond- ent. We go further: we believe that the true path to scientific dis- covery lies in the study of the spiritnallaws of the Universe. We accordingly lay down the following propositions in natural science as corollaries to the above spiritual propositions, and we deem them as necessarily susceptible of proof: 1. The ultimate plane of nature or primordial substance of the world is perfectly homogeneous, and nothing can be predicated of it bat inertia. 2. The so-called forces, Light, Heat, Electricity, Magnetism, &c., are not natural entities, but only different vibratile conditions of the same primordial substance, so that all forces or causes are necessarily spiritual. 3. All of these vibrations or undulations, being the material cOlTes- pondents of spiritual force, must emanate flOrn the natural sun as a centre. - 4. As the forces of Deity returning to himself produce the spiritual human fonn, the central object of creation, so it must be the corres- pondent tendency of matter to produce the natural human form. 5. As a particular expression of this tendency, all organizable matter passing into the organized state must exhibit the formative activity impr~ssed upon it, by developing from the circumference towards the centre. 1st Prop. All philosophers agree in ascribing to matter inertia, that is, DO tendency to move except on impulsion, and no disposition to stop when impelled. The first clause of this definition expresses the entire want of vitality in matter per se, and the second shows that all forces are inherently infinite, because representative of the will of God. Chemists have reduced the materials of the vorld to fifty-four elementary substances. But each of these substances is an aggre- gate of a number of ultimate atoms. Upon this atomic constitution of nature we wish to impress the character of homogeneity. Now it is the tendency of modern Chemistry to sho,v that the so-called proper- ties of bodies result not from the different nature, but from the differ- ent arrangement of their atoms. This inference ha.., been deduced from such facts as the following. Whatever variations the specific heat of substances present, that of their ultimate atoms appears to be uniform. Diamond, charcoal, and cotton are almost entirely com- posed ofpure ealhon. 80 that the same atom may make very different
  12. 12. 12 ne. Forcu and TlfldMciu of Nature. [Jan.impressions upon our senses. Berzelius declares that most of theelements may be made to assume conditions in which their proper-ties are entirely altered. All chemists agree that two or more sub-stances consisting of the same elements in the same ratio, may ex-hibit chemical properties entirely distinct. Draper has made chlorinepass from a state of high activity into one of complete torpor where-in all its properties were lost. Gay Lussac and others caused chlo-rine to displace hydrogen, atom for atom, in an organic compound,the former gas taking on the functions of the latter, although its hab-its and general properties are so very dissimilar. Dumas concludesthat these facts indicate that all chemical phenomena originate fromthe same cause and in due time may be generalized under one com-mon expression. For many similar facts confirmatory of our position,see an interesting article on the Present State of Chemical PhilosD-ophy, in the British and Foreign Medico-Chirurgical Review, forApril, 1848. Therefore a difference of properties is due to a difference of atomicarrangement. But all arrangement involves the idea of an arrangingforce. Inertia prohibits the supposition that such force is intrinsic.It is therefore extrinsic. Consequently nothing but inertia, the syno-nym of death, ca.n be predicated of mattpr. Natural substance wasproduced from spiritual substance not by continuity, but by a discretedegree. We will illustrate the mode of its creation as distinctly 88possible by a quotation from the New Church Quarterly Review, No.3, 1847. " The spiritual atmospheres are discrete substances or mostminute forces, radiating from the spirito.al sun. If now we supposethe act of creation k> be impossible in any lower degree, without theproduction of a minimal substance deprived of life, there is no diffi-culty in conceiving any given point of the supposed ray to have itsinterior activity withdrawn: in this case there could be a pla.y oflife around it only, and its superficies being compressed and fixed, itsmotion could describe natural spaces or times; that is to say, itwould become the first finited em of the natural world." A numberof such finites constitutes the primordial substance. We conceivethe result of this withdrawal of interior activity to be analogicallyrepresented by the condensation of an aeriform substance to the liqniaand solid or less active conditions by the abstraction of its heat, asthe Chemist would say. Before the spiritual activities acted upon this primordial substancethe earth was truly" without form and void." A particular arrange-ment of atoms was the material result of these spiritual activities.Different activities produced different arrangements, and consequentlydifferent substances and different forms. The primordial substancedoes not come within the cognizance of our senses: spiritual forceshave modified it before it enten the range of our perceptive faculties.But this does not controvert the ultimate fact, that the globe, theearth, the crystal of a salt, the leaf of a plant, the brain of an ani-mal, are different atomic arrangements of one substance, and as faras their own inherent properties are concerned, equally dead andinert. The human form itself is only recipient of life.
  13. 13. 1Nl.] n. Force, ad T~·ofNalMre. 18 Id Prop. Philoeophers speak of Heat, Light, Electricity, Magnet-ism, &c. as the ca. . . of the visible phenomena around us. The pro- visional 88S1Jmption of the material or corpuscular theories, for facil- ity of illustration, has fostered this misapprehension. From the high vantage-ground of our spiritual hypothesis we are prepared to aas81t, that the imponderable agents of modern philosophy have positively no individuality: that they are me,e names given to motions in cllifer- ent media, to the causes of which motions natural science can never penetrate, because they lie beyond the sensual ken in the spiritual world. All things originate in motion, &rid manifest themselves by motion. The primary motion we may suppose to be an arrangement or relative disposition of atoms. According to the degree of conden- sation which the arrangement evolves, we have di1Fer8llt auras _ media. We readily understand the meaning of the tenns, solid medi- um, liquid medium, guoous medium, etherial medium. Now to the motions of the atoms occurring in these media philosophers haYe given names, which many minds are content to receive as the eau. . of observed phenomena. We are not without the sanction of distin- guished authorities for our position. Any recent and full work on Phy- aim will show that the vibratory is fast superseding the old molecular theories. Arnott says, " Many philosophers hold that Heat is merely an affection or state of an ethereal fiuid, which occupies all space, as sound is an affection or motion of air, and that the sun may produce the phenomena of light and heat without waste ef its temperature or substance, as a bell may, without ·waste, continue to produce IOuneL" Light is an analogous undulation in a medium, the length of the wave determining the color, and its velocity determining the brilliancy of objects. Professor Draper, of whom America is so justly proud, re- marks: " The cause of Light is an undulatory motion taking place in an etherial medium. That such a medium exists throughout all space, aeems to be proved by a number of astronomical facts. In this e1u- tic medium undulatory movements are propagated in the same maB- ner as waves of sound in the air. It is to be clearly understood that the ether and light are distinct things: the la.tter is merely the effect of movements in the former." Again, in speaking of the chemical power of the solar ray, he says," Everything seems to indicate that lOOIler or later all these priDciples will be reduced to one of a more general nature, or that they are all modifications of movements taking place in the ether." The electric" fiuid" would appear to be mostrefractory to our annihilating process. But a distinguished votary ofIcience, Dr. Hare, of Philadelphia, says, "I find, it necessary to aban-don the idea that there ill any transfer of imponderable matter duringelectrical discharges." He attributes the phenome-na to a successivechange in the state of polarization of the atoms which make up theCODducting matter. In his article on galvanic ignition, we fiDd thefollowing sentence; "The phenomena under consideration, thoughirreconcilable either with the theory of one or that of two fluids,agrees with the idea of waves of polarization moving from the centreof the generating battery to the extremities." We dismiss the lOb.ject of magnetism with the statement that the solution oC the electrioand magnetic problems is analogous.
  14. 14. 14 [JaD. ThUll, by the process of exclusion, we have logically limited the materialist to an indefinite mass of inert matter, and to a series of vibrations perceptible, but to him inexplicable. He must deny the connection between cause and effect-yea, the very existence of a causative principle, or he must admit a formative foree, prior, supe- rior, and beyond the natural world. To the New Churchman these undolatory motions are possessed of beautiful significancy. They are the material correspondences of spiritual forces, flowing through the spiritual sun, from the Divine Being. Theyare ever present mir- rors which reflect to his eye the Love, the Wisdom, the Unity, the In- finity of his Creator. Spiritual forces produce spiritual media, spirit-.ual vibrations, spiritual forms, and by influx into inert matter, COfTe,- purulent natural media, natural vibrations, natural forms. The sci- ence of Correspondences flows as an obvious deduction from this fllD- damental truth. We perceive how allusions to natural objects in the Holy Word. have internal and 8piri~al meanings. We see that the material universe is the basis or continent of the spiritual universe,.perpetual in duratioD, ever changing in form. We get a clearer in- sight into the union of the soul and body, and into the holy mystery of the Incarnation. We become" convinced that the particles of our material body, having fulfilled the purpose of their aggregation, can never be translated from this natural sphere but must enter 8llcces- aive1y into new combinations, mineral, vegetable, or animal, for ever and ever. We are immutably grounded in a belief in the Immor- tality of the Human Soul. . ad Prop. Swedenborg says that the sun is the seat of pure fire. By this we understand him to mean that there the action of spiritual forces upon inert matter began, and is perpetually at its point of greatest intensity. Accordingly from the suo, as a centre, radiate undu- lations which modify the primordial matt~r. Sir John Herschel in his Astronomy, page 201, refers to the suns ray as the ultimate source of heat, light, electricity, terremial magnetism, chemical composi- tiODS and decompositioDS, vegetable vivification, geological changes, and even volcanic activity. But it may possibly be objected, are there Dot terrestrial sources of each of these phenomena 1 The German language has appropriately given the feminine gen- der to the word, sun; for truly it is the mother of all things, having created them of her substance, borne thtm in her bosom, and invPM- eel &hem with her properties. The nebular hypothesis, ascribed to La Place, but really due to Swedenborg. irresistibly maintains that each planet was stricken off from the sun by a centrifugal force at a period when &he solar mass extended to the present orbit of that planet. Our globe is a miniature sun, as a seed is a miniature plant, and a f<Btu a miniature man. Not that our earth will grow or develop into a BUD, but it retains the potentialities which existed in the cireum- ference of the suns disk, when that circumference was ruptured, con- glomerated into a minor s~here, and commenced an independent mo- aon. Accordingly it has thrown off its own satellite, and & minia- ture earth revolves around it, and illumines its night. Accordingly iD cenval heat is 80 great that our metals are liquid at the depth of
  15. 15. 1848.] 16Jive miles, ODly l-8QOth of the distance to its ·centre. By virtue ofthese SWl-brought potentialities we are enabled to develop what wecall artificial Heat, Light, &c., but the 8un immediately or mediatelyis the origin of all. But how insignificant are these to the stupen-dous direct in1Iuences of the great luminary! Even when they areproduced, they are always propagated from a centre, thus betrayingtheir origin by imitation or repetition of their archetype. The centri-fugal tendency of natural vibrations harmonizes accordingly with. thecentrifugal outflow of the Operative Energy of the Divine Nature. 4th Prop. Geological researches have scouted from the domain ofreason the puerile idea that the solar system was created in six days.Of the period of time which separated the appearance of the firstprimordial atom from the birth of our planet at the circumference ofthe nebular mu, the mind possessed of no data can form no concep-tion. It is equall)· bewildered in its attempt to grasp the course ofcenturies which elapsed during the condensation of the globe, and itaelaboration into a habitable form. The mineral kingdom existed inits manifold complications for ages before the production of thefirst vegetable germ. It bean on its imperishable front the daper-reotype impressions of plants, the mastodons of Botany, which flour-ished in their mephitic atmosphere and died long before the evolutionoC the first animal form. Subsequently, gigantic reptiles and moregigantic. quadrupeds, the common-place beings of pre.Adamite eras,prepared the way for animal races more subservient to the necessi-ties of man. Age after age, in beautifll1 succession, these animatedforms arose, each more perfect than its predecessor, because morenearly approximated to the archetype form of- the Universe. Atlength the central object of all the multiplied cares of nature appearsupon the stage so admirably fitted for his reception. ThoUBands ofyears have passed away, and hundreds of millions of his progeny-cover the face of the globe. We are struck with the wonderful orderiD which this extended development proceeded. The amorphousmaterial of the mineral kingdom gradually divided into the threepalpable forms of nature, solid, liquid, and gaseous, bearing in itsbosom the constituent particles of every form which has ever ~peared. Three of its elements, oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen seempossessed of a range of affinities almost infinite. These, by their di-versified combinations, constitute the vegetable kingdom, which wasthe intermediate agent to break down and decompose the inorganicmasses, and to elaborate the materials requisite for the constructionof animal tissue. Vegetables metamorphose the mineral elementspresented to them into albumen and fibrin, ready by their combina-tioDS to compose an animal body. Philosophers have been greatlybewildered in searching for the starting point and moving principle oforganization. Considered simply as a question for solution, the ar-rangement of a crystal is as wonderful 88 the petals of a fiower, or themechanism of an ey!.. We do not believe that lower forms developcontinuously into higher. Still less do we believe that the h~,griDniDg, speeohless ape, living on fruits, and fleeing in terror from&he beasts of the forest, was ever transmuted into erect, rational. de-
  16. 16. If} [Jan. vout, progressive, creative Man-who has laden the ocean with his vessels, and dotted the continents with his cities. But to refute thistheory we are bound to account for the remarkable anatomical re-semblance of the inferior animals to the Human Form. . The spiritual world is a world of uses; spiritual forces therefore which produce natural forms, produce them as forms of uses. We maintain that when a spiritual force acts upon matter, it eliminatesfrom that matter a form of being or use, such as its state of prepara- tion (dependent upon many collateral circumstances, all however re- gnIsted by spiritual laws) enables it to assume. Now all spiritual .forms have a reference to the highest spiritual fonn, viz.: the spirit-ual body of man. All material forms must evince a correspondingtendency to present the human form. At any given era of the world,the causative principle will develop a form more or less approximat-ing to the human form according to the degree of capacity in thematerial for taking on the human form. Thus at one time an oyster,at another & fish, at a third a quadruped was produced I The ap-pearance of the ourang.outang~only indicated that the time for thecreation of man was drawing near. No being can possibly be creat-ed until all the collateral forms of uses necessary to the full perform-ance of its own use, have been created before it. Man crowns thepyramid of animated, nature; for his use, therefore, direct or indirect,all things were created. The three kingdoms contribute to the form-ation of his body; the auras of the world vibrate for the instructionof his mind. He rends the bosom of the mountains and marches onthe snrface of the sea. He gathers around him the animals hechooses, in mute dependence, to lighten his labors or enhance hispleasures. He ,brings down the chamois from the cli~ and the eaglefrom his e)Tie. He hunts the wild beast for his sport, and pursuesthe huge whale for his profit. He measnres the courses of the comet,and marks the path for the obedient electricity. Yea, the very poi-sons which might destroy him immediately, are made to assuage hispains and to cure his diseases. These views are strikingly supported by a study of the growth ofthe human embryo. It passes through many transition..stages, eachof which Natural History can recognise 88 a permanent one in someorder of inferior animals. So that the animal kingdom from lowestto highest is a living tableau of the different transient stages of hu-man development. Truly when the ancients declared that manwas a microcosm, or miniature of the universe, they gave us a bro-ken ray of that sun-like philosophy which illuminated. the pure agesof the world. The mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms, therefore, may berepresented by three circles, one within another, all of whose rftdiiconverge to a common centre,.which is occupied by the natural hu-man fonn. 6th Prop. To understand correctly our fifth proposition, a distinc-tion mnst be drawn between growth and development. Inanimateobjects grow by accretion, but can present no traces of development-that is, of a definite arrangement of organs, subservient to eenain
  17. 17. 1848.] ne Forou and Tendenciu of Nature. 17 purposes. The development and growth of living beings are thiDgs entirely different. Development is the appearance of an organ iD an amorphous material, susceptible of organization. Growth is the increase in volume and weight of an organ already developed. De- velopment is the punctum saliens, the starting-point of natural form. Growth is a mere provision for the extension of that form. The for- mer is evidently a much more wonderful phenomenon than the latter. Recent physiological researches have shown that every organized" being is developed from a primary cell, ovule, or vesicle. St. Hilaire and Serres,ttwo of the greatest names in medical literature, promul- gated the law of centripetal formation, viz.: that the exterior orgaDII are formed first, and the most intemallast. We translate verbatim a brief summary of their extended la~ors from MarCM88Q,U (hnertJl .Jaatmny, a French work of standard value: "At this stage of de- velopment we notice a fact which confirms with irresistible power the doctrine of the centripetal succession of organs. Every germinat- iDg vesicle consists of three concentric layers or 1amiDm, differing iD nature. Of these the extemal or serous always begins to organiz~ first, and from it arise successively the spinal cord, brain, vertebne cranium, the organs of sense and their dependences. When the ex- ternal lamina has thus sketched ont the forms of the organs of ani- mal life, the middle or vascular lamina commences in its turn, and in a similar manner marks the outlines of the peripheral vessels, velllS, cavm, aorta, and heart. Up to this period the internal or mucus lamiDa has been inactive, but now its movements begin, and we see it successively delineate the alimentary canal, the lungs, the glandular system, liver, spleen, pancreas, &c. This order is invariable: Dot only upon one occasion but universally does nature proceed in this manner." Professor Jackson, of Philatlelphia, thinks that this view is confirmed by an appearance in some malforlnations of the nervous system. Although the central portions may be imperfect or even abeent, the peripheral expansions are normally developed, show- ing that after the periphery was formed, an arrest of development took place. We might here point out the centripetal formation of the planets of our solar system, from Le Verrier or Neptune, to Mercury, as plausibly maintained by the nebular hypothesis. We might show that the geological strata of the earth were successively formed at its surface, were ruptured and deposited according to their specific grav- ities. We might prove that the human or vegetable mould we tread OD has been concentrated from the atmosphere above us. We might refer to the progress of crystallization from the surface towards the centre of mineral solution. But we forbear a minute consideration of these subjects from a fear that more cautious and philosophic minds might regard the analogies as remote, unwarranted, or fanci- ful. But vhetner the theories merely ,suggested be tenable or not, the general truth of the centripetal developnJent of organize~ beings enunciated in this proposition is incontrovertihle. Collecting under one expression, the attraction of gravitation, at- traction of cohesion, chemical affinity, conatus of crystallization, veg-
  18. 18. 18 [Jan. et&:tive MICe, vital principle, &~., and denominating them the tenden- cie, of nature, and giving to undulatory motions the provisional tenn of far.ce, of nature, we may boldly lay down the principle-that the forces of nature are centrifugal, and the tendencies of na.ture centri-. petal. A beautiful equilibrium between these powers reta~s perpet- ually the earth in its orbit, the sun in its station, and the whole Uni- verse in a chain of sublime connection. From the Divine Being all things proceed: to the Divine Being all things tend: God is All in All. By a survey of such striking analogies, the New Churchman is enabled to render a reason of the faith which is within him. Or if he prefer to avoid disputation, and to concentrate his attention on the sublime articles of his creed, his mind will subside into that calm. aDd dignified philosophy, whose enchantment no scoffer can break, indisposed to assail the opinions of others, but immutable in its own. Many generous and gifted spirits during the middle ages spent their lives in the chemical laboratory in quest of a fabulous stone which could transmute the baser Inetals into coveted gold. Bat the receiver ofNew Church Theology is possessed of a talisman. far more potent, far more wonderful, which the more he nses the more powerful it be- comes; a talisman which can convert the commonest objects of life- the pebble at his feet, the snail in his path, the dew-drop on the flower; into spiritual truths, which will nourish his spiritual body, enlighten his understanding, and pnrify his heart. Modi,on, Ind. W. R. H. A.RTlCLE DI. i"or the N. c .• epolltor,.. lNTRRPOLATION IN THE DICTIONARY OF CORRESPONDENCES. • R. BDITOIl, Under the article" Eighth Day," in the IC Dictionary of Correspond- ences" (Bost. Ed. 1841), ,,~e read as follows: 1& EIGHTH DAY (the), denotes every beginniDg, consequently continuation. This is one reason why the liabbath was changed from the seventh day to the first, that is, by war of continuation, the eighth day, which denotes the beginning of a new Chnstian Church, at the end of the Jewish Chorch."-A. C. S63S. . Having some curiosity to learn what Swedenborg really taught on this subject, and not recollecting to have met with &D)" such passage as the above in my reading of the Arcana, I turned with special in- terest to the number referred to, and to my surprise found only the following ;- l& A son of eight days." That it signifies beginning and continuation appears from the signification of the eighth day, on which they were circumcised,... denoting every beginning, thus continuation, concerning which, n. i044.
  19. 19. 1841.] I"terpolation ita • DietioratJ,., Dj C~,. 1_ Here evidently is nothing touchiDg the change or the Sabbath day from the seventh to the first. Nor is there anything more explicit in the number here referred to,2044. He says indeed that" as the eighth day is the first day of the week following, it signifies every begin- ning ;" but this carries with it no intimation that the Sabbath is this first or eighth day of the week. In fact, though I have 8canned the writings of Swedenborg very carefully to see if any hint could be met with which seemed to recognise the change of day which ha• obtained in the Christian world, the search has thus far been fruitlesa. On the contrary, it would seem from the language of Swedenborg in the following extracts that it was not the time, bot simply the cliafYlder, of the day that was changed. U The Sabbath, among the SODS of Israel, was the 8ancti~ of sanctities be- caDJJe it represented the Lord; the six days, hislabors and combats with the. hells; and the seventh, his victory over them, and thU8 rest; and because that day was the representative of the close of the whole redemption of the Lord l therefore it was holiness itself. But v/un tJ&. Lord mm, into tJ&. vorld, aftCI rAft« ~ rP"amtation, of Him CIGIld, tl&at day beeam, a day 01 imtrudion in di- .nu tliftBJ,. atad tAu al. a da¥ of rat from laborJ and 01 meilitatioo Oft IUth t/aiftg• .. are of ltJ.tioft OM demallifl; GI also a d~ of low totlHJrdl tAl naghbor. That it became a day of instruction iD divine things, is manifest from this, that the Lord on that day taught in the tem:ple and synagogues, (Mark vi. 2i Luke iv. ~6t 31, 32; xiii. 10;) and that he slUd to the man who was healed, loa up * aftll tDiJll; and to the Pharisees, That it tDa$ lawful for tlu disciplu Oft tJie tA, Sa6INIIA . " to gat!wr tlu «IT of corn and to ,at, (Matt. xii. 1 to 9· MarJi H. 23 to the end; Luke vi. 1 to 6; John v. 9 to 19;) by which particulars, in the spire itual sense, is signified, to be instructed in doctrinals. That that day became also a da! of love towards the neighbor, is evident from th08e things which the Lord did and taught on the day of the Sabbath, (Matt. xii. 10 to 14; Mark w. 1 to 9; Luke vi. 6 to 12; xiii. 10 to 18 j xiv. 1 to 7; John v. 9 to 19 j vu. 21,23; ix. 14, 16.) From these and the former passages, it is manifest why the Lord said, that H, it Lord alIo oftJu &b6aIA, (Matt. xii. 8 j Mark ii. 28 j Luke Ti. 5;) and becaU8e He said thia, it fellows that that day was representatift of Bim."-T. C. R. SOl. I So.. again elsewhere. "The Lord when he was in the world and united His Human to the Divine itself, abrogated the Sabbath as to representative worship, or as to the w018hip which prevailed amon~st the Israelitish people, arid mad, tAt &b6atl day tJ dIiiy of itUtructioa iD tM doctr.M offaitA and love."-A. C. 10,360. Here is no hint of a change of tk day, but only of its fUU. Indeed, 88 the Sabbath denotes sriritually the state of rest consequent upon the labors and conflicts 0 the six days of regeneration, it constitutes a problem how, under the Dew dispensation, the Sabbath, which sig- nifies the repose and tranquillity of the last day of the spiritual week, should properly stand at the commencement of that week. Would not this imply that coqjuDction came before combat T-victory before temptation 1 . I do not, however, propound this matter for the sake of argument. Perhaps the time may come when the whole suqject will demand at the handtt of New Churchmen a more thorough-going and radical C&nv888ing than it has ever, in modem times, received. Bot at pres- ent my object is limply to bring to notice &he foregoiDg palpable ill-
  20. 20. - · o f tJ nppotMfl [J... terpolation in the Dictionary of Correspondences. I would ask up- on what authority such a sentence 88 the above has found its way into the work in question 1 It may be replied that it is copied verba- tim from Nichol8on, whose work is the basis of the Dictionary. But what authority had Nicholson 80 to mix up his own opinions with the statements of Swedenborg as to mislead the reader by making him think that Swedenborg had said vhat he never did say 1 As a general fact I have found Nicholson very fair in representing his author, but the present is plainly Rn exceptioD, and though both his work and the Diotionary of Correspondences founded upon it, are very Uleful manuals, yet it is to be hoped that the passage in question, if it be not expunged from future editions, may at least be known to re- ceive no countenance from anything advanced by Swedenborg. , SCRUTA~9R. ARTICLE IV. For the N. c. aepolltofr. MISCORRECTION OF A. SUPPOSED ERRONEOUS TRANSLATION IN THE ARCANA.• B. EITOR, I notice in No. 7 of your Repository, page 444, an intended correc-tion of a supposed erroneous translation, which it is unneoessary forme to quote in detail, aB those who Bre interested in it will tom to it.The translator had rendered " diluculum," earliest dawn; aDd the cor-rector proposes to render it twilight. What the corrector means bytwilight,-whether morning twilight or evening twiligllt, he does notsay; but the inference naturally is that he means the latter. If 80,he is in error, and the translator is right. Diluculum signifies morn-ing twilight, or daum: whereas evening tlDiligkl is expressed in theLatin language by crepu6ctdum. T. B. H. REMARKS. We are satisfied, upon examinatiollt that our correspondent T. B. H. is rightin his remarks on the correction proposed, and yet the mistake is one thatwould 80 easily aad naturally be made, without a cloae inspection of Sweden-bOilS usage of terms, that we are Dot at all surprised that it 1IGI made. Thefollowing is the original article which has drawn out the critique of T. B. H. "In a recent reading of A. C. 10,135, we noticed the following passage,-&From these considerations it may D<?W be manifest ,vhat is signified bymoming. and what by evening; but, let it be observed, that this morning in·volvea also mid-day, and that evening involves also the ,arli"tdatm (diluculum).Thia should evidently be rendered twiligltt, as it is in the sentence immediately
  21. 21. IN.) SIfoUowing j l For when mention is made in the Word of morning and evening,in such case the whole day is meant, thus by morniug-also mid.day, and byevening also night or tflJilight (diluculum). The error is 80 obvious, that wetrost it may be corrected in future editions." Bere it is evident that the same original term is rendered in one case earliuttlatm, and in the other tUJilight, and ,ve have recently noticed that in the Man·chester edition of the Arcana, printed in 1820, the phrase earliest daum doesnot occur at all, bat dilueulum is unifonnly rendered by ttl1ilight-a term whichin ordinary parlance denotes, as is well known, the ftJening ttDilight. Withouta special recurrence to the original Latin 0 f Swedenborg, the impressionWould undoubtedly be that by t1Dilight was meant the ob&cure ligit oftlu et1m-iAg, both here and in the following passage. &1 The reason why morning denotes a state of love and of light thence de-rived in the intemal man is, because in the heavens with the angels the statesft.IJ as to love and the faith thence derived, as in the world with men timesft.IJ as to heat and at the same time light; those times are, as is well known,morning, mid-day, evening and night; hence in the Word by morning is sig-nified a state of love, by mid.day a state of light in clearness, by evening a&&ate of light in obscurity, and by night or twilight a state of love in obscWity."-..4.. C. 10,134. In this passage, however, the original is dilucwU1A as before, and by a strictcomparison of taeveral parallel places it appears unquestionable that themeaning attached by our author to the word is uniformly that of the early da.,.,just preceding the mane or morning. The usage is very distinctly set forth inthe ensning extracts. l:. These states also are meant by morning, mid-day, evening, and nigbt orI.light in the Word; in like manner states of the Church, the first state ofwhich is also called morning in the Word, the second state mid-day, the thirdevenin~, and the fourth or last night; but when the Church is in its night, inwhich It is when no longer in Jove to God and in faith, then morning com-mences from the ea,.liest daum (diluculum) with another nation, where a newChurch is e8t2.blished."-.A. C. 10,134. " It is from this ground that it ,vas said, that he (Peter) should thrice deny;that this was done in u." early davm (diluculum) when morning was about tocome, is manifest from John, chap. xviii. 28; and that eock-tr~.Ding and etl"l.,tl4. . (dilueillum) denote the 88Jne thing is evident from Mark, Watch ye, forye know not when the Lord of the house is about to come; in the evening, orat midnight, or at coek-trOtDing, or in the morning (xiii. S5.)"-lbid. The general subject here treated of is the variation or vicissitude of statesin the spiritual world. " For the states of love and of light vary with the angels, as in the worldthe states of the times of the day vary: which are morning, mid-day, evening,night or tM .rliest dawn (diluculum), and again morning; when the angels arein a state of love, then it is morning to them, and then the Lord appears tothem as the rising SUD; when they are in a state of light, then it is mid-dayto them j but when they are in a state of light in obscutity. then it ill eveningto them: and afterwards when they are in a state of love in obscurity or in.some degree of cold, then it is night to them or rather the early datJm (dilucu-lurn) to them; such states succeed continually with the angels, and by themthey are continually perfecting; but those variations do not exist from thesun there, its riaing and setting, but from the state of the interiors 0 f the VOLe D. 2
  22. 22. • [Ju.....els themselves; for they desire, like men, to be ODe while in their inter-nals, another while in extemals; when they are in internals, thell they are ina state of love and of light thence derived in clearness, and when in externals,then they are in a state of love and of light thence derived in obscurity, forsuch is the extemal in respect to the internal; hence comes the origin of thevariations of the states of the angels."-A. C. 10,136. To a full view of the reasons of this peculiar usage it is important to bear ill mind the fact mentioned A. C. 6110 ;-" It is to be known, that in heaven there is no night, but only evening! which is succeeded by the twilight (dilueu- lum) that precedes the morning; but in hell there is night." So far as the. Church in the world is conjoined with heaven it has no night, properly speak~ ing; but 80 far as it disjoins itself from heaven it is subject to lapse into nights darkest shades. Swedenborg accordingly says in reference to the Churches that have been J " - Il Such etates also are the states of every Church from its beginnmg to itaend, its first state is likewise a state of infancy, thus also of innocence, conse-quently of love to the Lord, this state of it is called morning; the second stateis a state of light; the third state is a state of light in obscurity, which is itsevening; and the fourth state is a state of no love and hence neither of lightwhich is its night: the reason of this is, because evils increase every day, and80 far as they increase, so far one infects another like a contagion, especiallyparents their children; besides that hereditary evils are successively condens-ed, and thereby derived."-.A. C. 10,136. The general theme of variations of states among the angels is one of 80much interest that we cannot forego the opportunity, thus casually offered, ofdwelling a little longer upon it. This we do in the ,vords of our author, .Aa C.5962. U He who does Dot know how the case is withJthe state of the life of spirits and of angels in the heavens, cannot knov vhy the occultation of truth and good&b.ouJd be now treated of. when they had been in the light thereof JUBt before.That state of Life in heaven is this, that spirits and angels have their morning,m.id.day, and evening: also twilight, and again morning, and so on; theirmorning is, when the Lord is present, and hlesses them with manifest happi-nees, Bnd they are then in the perception of good; mid.day is when t.hey arein the light of truths; and evening, when they are removed from them, andthen it appears to them that the Lord is more remote, and concealed fromthem: all who are in heaven undergo andjass through these vicissitudes,otherwise they cannot be continually perfecte : for hence they have relati,-e.,and from relatives more perfect perception, inasmuch 8.8 they thence knowwhat is not happy, because hence they know what is 110t good, and what isnot tme. It is worthy of admiration, that one state is in no case altogetherlike another to eternity; also that one spirit and angel does not pass throughsimilar changes of state as another, by reaSOll that one is not alt.ogether likeanother as to good and truth, jUBt as no two men are precisely alike in counte-nance: but yet the Lord from those varieties makes a one; it is a generalcanon, that every 006, in which there is any quality, exists from varietjes~which are reduced into such unanimity by the CODsent of harmony, thatthey appear all as one; the one thence derived, or the union ill the heave1l&,i8 effected by the love and charity. The occultation, which is signified byJoseph8 sending away his brethren and their going, is in the Word calledevening, which has place with angels at those times when they do not per-oeive the Lord present, for there iR in heaven a continual perception of theLord when they are in a state of non-perception, they are not then alfectedwith good, neither do they see the truth, as before, and this torments them;but shortly afterwards twilight (diltu:ulum) comes and thus the momiDl."
  23. 23. 1841.] It is still to be bome in mind that these vicissitudes originate with the an- •gEJs, and not with the Lord. 1& That noon denotes a state of light, is because the times of the day, asmorning, DOOD, evening, correspond to illu8trations in the other life, and illus-trations there are of intelligence and wisdom; the vicissitudes of illustrationthere are such, namely as morning, nOOD, and evening on the earths: statesof shade exist like those in the evening, not from the SUll there, that is, theLord who always shines, but from the proprium of the angels; for as theyare let into their own proprium, 80 they come into a state of shade or evening;and as they are elevated from their own proprium into the heavenly propri-nlD, 80 they come into a state of light: hence it is evident from whence it is.that noon corresponds to a state of light."-..4. C. 6672. On the whole we profes8 ourselves obliged to our correspondent for pre-senting us with the occasion that has led to aD interesting examination OD apoint that had escaped our notice before, and which we presume will besomewhat Dew to our readers. It is evident that Swedenborg8 use olthe termdilUftllum is uniform, always denotin@ the morning and not the evening ttDiligh,though the term twilight is constantly employed in the Manchester edition ofthe Arcana, while· early or earliest datDn as uniformly oecurs in the London, wichhowE!ver, the single exception in No. 10,135, which suggested our originalcriticism. As to T. U. H.s closing remark in regard to the legitimate import ofthe two words diluculum and crepusculum, no scholar could of course fail to beaware that such is their dominant usage in the classic writers, but as the ideaof a little light is the leading idea of the term. diluculum, as it is also of theEnglish word tviligl"t, we know not that Swedenborgs Latinity would beliable to be seriously called in question were the term found to be applied byhim to express the lWning ttltiligl&t; still, in point of fact, it is not so. His use ofthe term, as we have seen, is correct and uniform, and we trust that this littlecritical encounter will be the means o{ clearing up an interesting topic far .beyond the original intention of either party. A.RTICLE v. SWEDENBORGS INTERCOURSE IN THE SPIRITUAL WORLD. Wz give in tbp ensuing list the names of a yery large proportion of the individuals of vhom Swedenhorg speaks in his " Spiritual Diary,"as having either conversed with them in person, or as having ac-quired and communicated a knov."ledge of their states after death.Many of them are of course personages of whom little or nothingcan be expected to be known in this country and at this period, beingeontemporaries or associates of Swedenborg him8el~ and leavingbehind no celebrity. The greater number, however, are names towhich posthumous distinction, to agreate ror less degree, attaches, andrespecting whose condition and character in the other world it is in-teresting to be informed, provided we can regard the infoflnation aa
  24. 24. (Jan.authentic. The New Churchman has small hesitation on this score;with others the testimony of our enlightened Seer will probablyweigh so little that the divulgement will draw after it no injuriousconsequenceL . Abraham, Alderbeim, Addison, St. Antony, Aristotle, Augustus,Barek, Benzelstiern, Calvin, Cicero, Cocceius, David, Dippel, Jacob,Lejel, Luther, Mary (Virg.), Melanctbon, Mohammed, Moses, Nord-berg, Sir Isaac Newton, Paul, Penn, Peter, Polheim, Pope Sextus theFifth, Sir Hans Sloan, Rudbeck, SchOnst, Solomon, Louis XIV tb,ZiDzendor£ ARTICLE VI. VINDICATION OF 8WEDENBORG FROM THE MISREPRESENT.. ATIONS OF WESLEY, IX .&. LET1D nOM THE LATE BEV. 10lDf BABQaOV:L THE following letter, we believe, has never before been published. It hasbeen hitherto in the possession of the family of Mr. Hargrove, and from themhas come into our hands. The original is without date. It was apparently in-tended to be followed by a series of letters on the same subject, but this partof the plan seems never to have been executed. An extended and unanswera-ble refutation of Wesleys main slander against Swedenborg has indeed beengiven to the world by Mr. Noble in his U Appeal," and in a volume of biographi-cal le Documents" embraced .in the Swedenborg Library; but the present letterpresents the conduct of the founder of ltfethodism in some new lights, so faras it regards his treatment of S,~edellborgs memory ~and writings, such aswill scarcely fail, we think, to lower the tone of opprobrium with which manyof his clerical followers are prone to assail those of their people who areknown to be turning their attention to the doctrines of the New Church. Sofar as we have learned, these spiritual guides are very little acquainted withthe works of Swedenborg, and therefore cannot denounce them from theirown knowledge, but their policy is to intimidate and deter from reading byappealing to the authority of Wesley, who has not scrupled to characteriseSwedenborg as a madman~ alleging in proof of it the fact (clearly shown tohave been a fiction) of his having run naked into the street, proclaimed him-self the Me8siah, and rolled himself in the mire! They seem to be totallyguiltless of the leut approach tpwards &"conception that the real question atissue is not whether Swedenborg was ,aM or in,an" but whether what hewrote is tn&e or fah,. This question is being so fast settled in a multitude ofintelligent minds at the present day that the coarse ridicule and violent tiradesof Wesley are becoming as much of a t,zum imbeUe to prevent the spread of theN. C. doctrines as were the brickbats and bludgeons that took the place oflogic in opposing the early career of Methodism.DEAB. BIll, "Wesley8 Thoughts," &c. made their first appearance in the worldthrough the medium of the English Arminian Magazine, for the year
  25. 25. 1848·1 16 1783, vol. 6, London edition;- and after havitlg run their race andfinished their course in the olel world, vere piously resuscitated in thenew through the medium of the American Methodist l{agazine, forthe year 1797, voI. VII. Philadelphia edition. "Beatsons Vindica-tion," &0. was addressed to the publie, only through the medium ofthe "Magazine of Knowledge for the New Chureh," for the year 1791,vol. 2, London edition; very few copies of whicb have ever reached America. Mr. Beatsons " vindication" of our favorite author certainly pos.-sesses great merit, both as to matter and manner; yet is not 80 fullupon the subject, perhaps, as to preclude the propriety (though I willnot add necessity) of a fe,,· more impartial remarks on the same sub-ject, from the plain unpolished pen of your hwnble servant :-more-over, as I shall thereby not only evidence my respect for yourself; sir,at whose pressing request I have now taken up my pen, but alsotestify my veneration, gratitude and afrection for that highly illuminat-ed, truly pious, and greatly penJecuted man, the Baron Emanuel Swe-denborg, to whom, under GOD my SAVIOUR, I am chiefly indebted forall the genuine knowledge of the Scriptures that I now possess. And if my heart doth. not deceive me, I am not led to write thefollowing remarks so much from an intention to expose the celebrat-ed founder of the llethodist E. Church, or to taunt or mortify any ofhis numerous followers- (many of whom doubtless are men of candorand piety), as to comply with what I conceive to be the requisitionsof duty from me, and thereby retain "the testimony of a good con-science" in my own breast. And such is the power of truth, whensubmitted to the candid mind under an honest, plain and logical form,that though I am unhappily possessed but of very few classical at- tainments, and unskilled in the ,vHy tactics of religious controversy,I despair not of producing the most unexpected and serio11S convic- tions upon the minds of all who may be liberal and patient enough to pursue the following remarks with impartiality and attention. It is granted that the Rev. Mr. Wesley was & very extraordinary character; and when ,ye reflect upon his great success in calling sinners to repentance, and his great labors as a preacher of the gos- pel, we should not hesitate in allowing that" he duerved 1Dell DJ" hu country." But certainly it would be very bad logic to infer fJ·om this, that all the religious and political doctrines which he held and pro- Fagated were true; or even that the motives which prompted his ex- traordinary labors were pure, and free from the defiling loves of self; and of dominion. The labors, the sincere and pious labors, ofaXavier, in endeavor- ing to propagate the tenets of the Church of Rome in Asia, ,vere probably greater (until he sunk a mart)..r to them) than those of Mr. Wesley to establish his favorite system in a more civilised part of the world. Indeed the labors and toils of an Alexander or & Bonaparte, in subjecting millions to their arbitrary and delpotic sway, have doubt- less been no less; nor their propensity to contend with all those sur- rounding nations which seemed to stand in the way of their growing
  26. 26. [Jan. fame and power, greater than that of Mr. Weeley to contend with every surrounding sect (or apiritual nation) which da.red, in his da.y, to differ from him in any point of Christian faith or practice, or im- pede the rapid and enormous progress of his religiou8 popularity and power. It is true, we are exhorted by an Apostle to" contend earne,tlyfor the faith once delivered to the aaint8." And it is equally certain that mere defensive vars are not unlawful, for otherwise 8elf-pruer- vation itself would be unlawful; yet, I must be permitted to fear that it is one and the same kind of spirit which has generally stirred upone religious sect to contend with, and cruelly calumniate all otherswho have differed from them, apd that which now i, prompting themighty warriors and belligerent nations of the earth to contend withand destroy or subjugate all others who cannot with propriety andsafety fall in ,vith their designs. And here I would add, that it is somewhat consoling to reflectthat the Divine providence, foreseeing the sad necessity of wars, hath,in mercy, inclined the most contentious and powerful nations of theearth to establish, and also to regard, some general laws, or rules, asto their conduct towards their enemies, ar those they are about tomake war against (calculated to lessen the miseries and inhumanityso apt to accompany such a state) the wanton or avoidable trans-gressions of which general laws or rules have always been branded withinfamy and wickedness by every lover of peace, equity and goodorder. Hov much more then does it become all those who professto figbt under the banner of the" Prince of peace," to establish, andconscientiousl~r attend to some similar laws, or rules, whensoeverthey may conceive it to be their duty to contend with any of theirfellow-Christians, respecting mere religious opinions 1 Indeed the Rev. Mr. Wesley himself (who like Goliahof old ,vasa man of war from his Iyouth) became so thoroughly convinced ofthe propriety and justice of attending to some "stated rules" in con-troversy, that he has laid dovn and established some of th,ese rule8in his celebrated and printed" Remarks on Mr. Hills Reyiew of allthe Doctrines taught by Mr. Wesley." This little pamphlet is nowbefore me, out of which I must beg leave to make a few extracts, inorder to prove how un generous and how unjust Mr. Wesleys mannerof attacking Baron Swedenborg was, ,vhatever might have been hisgenuine and interior motivu. 1. "Mr. Hill publishes a review of all the doctrines taught by Mr.John Wesley; but is it possible for any man to do this without read-ing all the writings that I have published T Is it possible in thenatare of things 1 He cannot give an account of what he never read;and has Mr. Hill read all that I have published 1 I believe he willnot affirm it. So any man of understanding may judge, before heopens his book, what manner of review it is likely to contain."-p.9. 2. "I observe here, and in fifty other instances, Mr. Hill mentionsno pa.ge ; now (in controversy) he that names no page has no right toanyanswer."-p. 15. 8. "Here I must beg leave to put Mr. Hill in mind of one stated
  27. 27. 1849·1raJe in oontroversy, we are to take DO authorities at second hand."-p. 45. Now, sir, you are doubtless ready with me to subscribe to all theabove excellent rules in controversy; but what shall we say, orwhat sha.ll we think, if Mr. W~sley himself: ten years after he laiddown these rules, and loudly remonstrated against the breaking ofthem by Mr. Hill, coolly and without tile least personal provocation,broke through them all, and wantonly and repeatedly transgressedthem 1 Well might St. Panl say, "Happy is he who condemneth nothimself in that which he alloweth !" I shall now proceed, sir, to lay before yon proofs, the ttmtlemniRKproofS, of this serious charge, which I have advanced against the Rev.Mr. Wesley. And 1st. Previous to Mr. Wesleys attack upon the Baron, did Aeread all the theological works of the maD whose religious system heW88 about to refute 1 Let us hear what Mr. We81ey himself hassaid upon this subject in the 5tli No. or paragraph of his" Thoughts011 tIN Writing. of Baron Swedenborg." " Desiring to be thoroughly master of the subject. I procnred thetranslation of the PI1l8T volume of his LAST and LARGBBT Theologic&lwork, entitled" TRUE CHRISTIAN RELIGION" (the original the Baronhimself presented me with a little before he died), I took an extra.ctthereof; from the beginning to the end, that I might be able to form amore accurate judgment." What! form an accurate judgment of the contents of a system,which fills about thirty other volumes, equally large with the ODe bealludes to, by merely looking into that" one 1 "Impossible in thenature of things," 88 Mr. W estey rightly observed in his printed re-marks in his answer to Mr. Hill. ~ This accurate gentleman egregionsly erred likewise, in 8S8uringhis readers that the work entitled" TRUE CHRISTIAN RELIGION," wasthe largest of all the Baron~ Theological works, when the truth isthat his work entitled" AKCANA Ca:LESTIA" (written long before) i. at least six times as large as the former I On this article, therefore, may we not add, with great propriety, and in the language of Mr. Wesley himself in his printed remarks before alluded to, "So then,any man of understanding ma.y judge, before he opens Mr. Wesleys book, what manDer of T1wv.ght8 it is likely to contain." Id. Has not Mr. Wesley transgressed his own ,tated rule. i..controversy, also, by never referring his numerous aDd implicit rea.- ders, in anyone single instance, to the No. or page of the Baron. works from whence he made his extracts 1 And could he expect any answer to 1&i8 remarks 011 Swedenborgs doctrine, when he only reflected for a moment on his own stated ",le in controversy, to wit: " He that names no page (in controversy) has no right to an answer." The troth is, that Mr. Wesley "rished no such answer to be made to his attack npon the Baron, any more than he wished his readers to CODsWt the originals from whence these mutilated, disjointed, and Itodionsly obscure extracts are .aid to be taken, lest thereby his OWtl waDt of justice and liberality might be di8closed, and the pare light
  28. 28. [Jail. of genuine truth, from the heavenly doc";au of the fiew Jerusalem, break in upon their souls. When Mr. Wesley tells his readers that ·the Baron was iruane, and that he " rolled himself in the mire," &c.; does he add that he himself 88W this 1 Far from it; on tbe contrary (regardless of another of his stated role, in controversy) he runs to mere" second hand authority," though ten years before he could " beg leave to put Mr. Hill in mind that we are to take no authorities at second band." . And who were these second hand authorities that Mr. Wesley brings forward to substantiate this charge of madne88 against the Baron 1 Why, a Mr. Brockmer, at whose house the Baron lodged, .and a "very serious Swedish clergyman, a Mr. Mathesius." Now it is a fact, that this lery Mr. Brockmer publicly testified that he never opened his mouth to Mr. Wesley on the subject (See Mag. of Know- ledge for the New Church, Vol. 11. p. 92). And also that this Rev. Mr. Ma.thesius (like some other Rev. gentlemen,) was, with all hiB ",erioU8ne8S," a violent and bitter enemy to tbe Swedenhorgian The- ology and actually became insane himself a little after he propagat- ed this report of the Baron, and was dismissed from his congrega- tion in London, and sent back to Sweden to li,Ye upon the bounty of his country. . One thing seems, however, very singular, with respect to the Baron, that all the time he was insane and" rolling himself ~R tile mire," he took care to keep his pen clean I-clean from ever contra- dicting himself, or calumniating any of his fellow-Christians. This is more than some of his most popular opponents have done; for let us hear what Mr. Wesley himself confesttea, in the pamphlet alread)- alluded to (p. 11), in reply to Mr. Hill. " You charge me likewise, and that more than once or twice, with maintaining contradictions: I answer, if all my sentiments were compared together from the year 1725 to 1168, there would be truth in the charge, for during the latter part of this period I have relinquished several of my former. seDtiments." . And again, in the 33d page of this same memorable little pam- phlet (which indeed is all of Mr. Wesleys writin~ now in my po&-- Bession), Mr. Wesley him8el~ being run hard by Mr. HiIJ, OD. a cer- tain point of doctrine, is fairly compelled to own that after he had assumed the dignity of a commentator on the Holy Scriptures, and had actually published notes on the Ne,v Testament, he had no just ideas respecting the nature of indwelling ain in the regenerate chil- dren or God ! In the first edition of Wesleys Notes on the New Testament (2 Epis. -to the Cor. v. ch. 4th verse), we have it as follows: Text-" For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened." We,ley. notes.-" That is, with numberles.fJ infirmities, tempta- tions and sins." But in his reply to Mr. Hill, above alluded to, in order to steer clear of Calvinism, and keep his neck out of the noose that Mr. Hill had prepared for him, he hesitates not to contradict himsel~ and deny the truth of his former comment. Hear his own vords OD this occa-
  29. 29. 1MB.] •&ion ; • This is wrong; it is BOt the· meaning of the ten; I wilLp.t itout if I live to print another edition I I I" Meantime, however, his former and confessedly erroneous editienremained in the hands of thousands of his innocent followers, many ofwhom, doubtless, were to indigent to purchase a new edition ofWesleys notes on the New Testament as often as their ha.~ty authorwas compelled to reJect the old. But it is only fair, play to admit Mr. Wesleys own defence of him-self OD this occasion, which may be found in the 11th page of hisaforesaid replYto Mr. Hill, in the following words: M The plain case is this. I have written on varioaa heads, andalways as clearly as I could, yet many have misunderstood my words,and raised abundance of objections. I answered them by explainingmyself; showing what I did not mean, and what I did. One andanother of the objectors stretched his throat, and cried out evasion· Ievasion I And what does all this outery amount to 1 Why., exactlythus much: they imagined they:had tied me so fast that it was im~poaible for me to escape; but presently the ceb,vebs were sweptaway, and I was quite at liberty." Bravo! But then may it not be asked, in the name of sympath,.and Christian charit)", why could not Mr. Wesley reflect that it mightbe possible for him also to mUurtder.land the Barons words andmeaning, at a time too when it ~as DO long~ in the power of thelatter to explain himsel~ and show what he did not mean, and whathe did? And why was this celebrated preacher of Christian i8.ithand practice so willing, and so hasty in reverberatiog with the mali-cious and unhappy Mathesius, Madman! Madf1lll7l! One more observation may be proper here. in order to show stillmore strikingly the ihameful and 81wcking disregard- for justice, truthor charity, which the Rev. Mr. Wesley has evinced in his unprovokedauaek on Baron Swedenborg. This observation, it is true, did notescape the notice of Mr. Beatson, and it is as follows: "In W esleys Thoughts on the Writings of Baron Swedenborg,No. 8, he inserts the folloWIng words, 88 an extract from the Baronswork entitled 7rue Ohriatian Religion ;- There is no faith in aniDYisiblA God I " Now, sir, wha.t will the admirers of Mr. Wesleys honesty andcandor think, or tJay, when they are assured that in all the Baronsvoluminous works there is no such expression I " O! tell it notin Gat~ pablish it not in the streets of Askelon, lest the daughters ofthe Philistines rejoice, lest the uncircumcised be glad." Or, in otherwords, lest the evil affections of the enemies of revealed religion begratified in perceiving the little regard Mr. Welley .has paid to hisown excellent 8.nd stated r~ of religious controversy, any morethan to the rules of justice, faith and Christian charity in his unpro-voked attack on Baron Swedenborg. Indeed the manner of his commencing this attack, by introducinga disjointed paragraph or two from 8. letter written by the Baron tohis Rev. and learned friend Mr. Hartley, and on the earnest requestof &he latter, is truly siDgular and peculiar to himself: Destitute of
  30. 30. 10 [JaILaDy order or introduction, modesty or mercy, he denounces the trUlysystematic and learned founder of the New Jerusalem Church as &madman, before he had finished his third paragraph; and this toomerely because Swedenborg had announced that the Lord had"opened to him a sight of the spiritual world !" But if this high and gracioos privilege constitutes a madman,then how plainly will it follow that most of the holy prophets andapostles of old were madmen also 1 Except Mr. Wesley can provethat the ann of the Lord is shortened since their days, and that how-ever loudly the state of his Church may require such gracious vouch.safements, to arrest infidelity and banish superstition, yet he ba.th"forgotten to be gracious," or is now too angry to confer any moresuch ancient favors on his Church. It is Dot my design, sir, in this letter, to make any reply oC a doe-trinal nature to the various objections which Mr. Wesley has madeto the Theology of the Lords New Church; but chiefly to offer afew remarks on the manner, the unfair and ungeneroos manner,which he has taken to answer the end he had in view. It may beappropriate however, with this plan, to make one more remark with~t to the concluding words of Mr. Wesleys primary thoughts onBaron Swedenborg; where, after retailing a paragraph of the Baronsletter to the Rev. and learned Thomas Hartley, written, let it be re-membered (for Mr. Wesley has not seen proper to insert that part ofthe letter) at the earnest request of Mr. Hartley, Mr. Wes)ey thusconcludes, " This is dated London 1769, I think he (the Baron) livednine or ten years longer." Now had Mr. WesJey condescended to make any inquiry intothis matter, previous to favoring the world with his" Thoughts on theWritings of Baron Swedenborg," or looked into that admirable eulo-gium delivered on the occasion of the death of Swedenborg, in thehall of the house of nobles, in the name of the Academy of Sciencesat Stockholm, the 7th of Ootober, 1772, by Monsieur Sandel, kni~ht ofthe polar star, and member of the said Academy, he might haveuuule his fint thoughts on the writings of Baron Swedenborg morecorrect by about seven years. But the good man had not time for this. So ea.ger was he to break& lance with the dead; or rather to arrest the progrp,ss of the Baronsdoctrines among his own societies, several of whom, both preachersand people, began about the period Mr. Wesley wrote his" Thoughts,"&c. to receive the Heavenly doctrines of the Lords New Church.Now what makes the uncorrectness of Mr. Wesleys primary thoughtson our favorite author the more astonishing to me will appear fromthe following extract of a letter, received some time ago from theRev. Mr. Pownal, minister of the New Jerusalem Church in Bristol,Great Britain, the original of which I have carefully filed amongmy religions documents. This letter is dated the 6th October 1804,and is as follows : "Our Methodist brethren here have Dot that tender spirit of lovefor us that we have manifested towards them. I was in communionwith them above tweaty yean. That amiable, worthy and much

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