SWEDENBORGSJOURNAL OF DREAMS                1743-1744    Edited from the original Swedish          by G. E. Klemming    Tr...
StudlaSlOedenborglana      Published intermittently by the Swedenborg School ojReligionVoU                     January 197...
SWEDENBORG SCHOOL OF RELIGION                               Established in 1866 by the                        General Conv...
Emanuel Swedenborg
3              THE PERIOD OF TRANSITION *   The story of how, from being a scientist and naturalphilosopher, Swedenborg be...
4                            h -!}- ~~     J   ~these inclusive dates~, 1744 in July, 1744; andin April, 1745. Two of thes...
footnotes of his Regnwn Animale (The Hague                              ~Ind   Lon­don, 1744-5):      ... It meant ... tha...
6    ~n;        holy thoughts came, but of such a nature that    they are unfathamable, far 1 cannat in the least express ...
7 world. It is, in fact, precisely this claim of such com­ munication which earned Swedenborg the label of "mys­ tic" or "...
8     chosen me to declare to men the spiritual contents of     Scripture; and tha t He Himsel f would declare to me wha t...
9years. A number of times before he had asked for tem-porary leaves of absence, from a few days to a full year.This time h...
101~1l"gdy   responsible for the fact that the scholarly world,both in the physical sciences and in the humanities, hasrLl...
SWEDENBüRGSJOURNAL OF DREAMS                1743-1744    Edited from the original Swedish          by G. E. Klemming    Tr...
13     PREFACE Tü     T~! SW~DI~~   The Royal Library in Stockholm purchased a short time ago [October 1858] the original ...
A facsimile ofpage 57 of Swedenborgs original manuscript.
15 the editor deals solely with the subject in the interest of literary history, and confines his office to the task of of...
16annexed certificate of our distinguished reader of manu­scripts, Herr F. A. Dahlgren, amanuensis in our StatePaper Offic...
i7              PREF ACE TO THIS EDITION   Gustaf Klemming, editor of the J 859 edition, was anavowed enemy of Swedenborgi...
18Swedenborg, methodically exposed the plagiaristic na­ture of the purported new translation of Holm feld.   In the course...
s V E 1~ E ~ B 0 1{- t 8     nH()YM                R               r                    l-ti ll~ l~U    l    UU~. Ul 11ba....
21    [1] *G~~the      21st of July, 1 travelled from Stock­ holm, arrived on the 27th at Ysta~, after passing through Tal...
ÎÎGeorge.   Thence on the Il th; and on the way visited Gade­buch, the scene of the battle between the Swedes andDanes; af...
23under the Prince of Orange. At Leewarden 1 saw hispalace, as well as his mothers; the latter is ca lied thePrincess Pala...
24               ail my life.            9. How 1 was      ln   wak ing trances nearly the               whole time.     [...
myself from the abyss of heli, which is not possible tobe done.   [17] How a woman laid down by my side, just as if 1was w...
26   [21] 4. Spoke with our successor in Sweden (whowas turned into a woman) freely and familiarly; after­wards with Carl ...
27  that Hesselius had another. 1 was taken in to custody,  and watched. Many people came to me in vehicles. ft  seemed to...
28 lieve.      (29) Saw a procession of men; magnificent;jewelled; so fine that 1 never saw anything finer; but it disap­ ...
29  into a lake; as he was driving it in, the coachman called  out to the other coach to take care: there was also dan­  g...
30    wished to look out on the first body that marched, which    appeared to me to be magnificent. Wakened. It is a    gr...
31                               [April] 5-6.       [38] Easter day was the 5th of April. On that day l   vent to Gods tab...
32  open jaws: it could not bite me; nor could 1 do it much  harm. At last 1 got it by thejowl and squeezed it hard;  also...
33times, and ail was in answer to my thoughts, yet in suchwise that there was su ch a life and such a glory in all that1 c...
34                  April 6-7. N.B. N.B. N.B.     [49] ln the evening 1 came into another sort of  temptation, namely, bet...
3S    l found that something holy was upo~me; [52] 1 then    fel! into a sleep, and at about 12:00, 1:00 or 2:00 in the   ...
36  Spirit, and in this way prepared hereto; as a1so that 1 fell  on my face, and the words 1 spoke; and the prayer, that1...
PubliJhed intermillent/j1 by the Swedenborg School 01ReligionVol. 1                         June 1974                     ...
SWEDENBORGS FATHER JESPER SVEDBERG (1653-1735)    According to William Whites 1867 biography of Swedenborg, theabove pictu...
3      In this second issue we continue the text of Swedenborgs  1743-44 Journal of Dreams. The rest of the issue is devot...
4such a matter, but it has no relation thereto. [59] In­stantly thereupon 1 found rit in me] to answer, accord­ing to my c...
5        The night between [ApriJ] 7th and 8th.   [62] Throughout the whole night 1 was going downdeep, stairs after stair...
6  so hard that 1 was withheld from aIl other thought; only to give them free rein for once, to go against the power  of t...
7nothing was available to drive it away; it held me so cap­tive that 1 did not know whither to fly, for 1 bore it withme. ...
8him ail the ill 1 could to the highest degree, in order thatnothing at ail of the sin should stick to him, and thatwith e...
9   to myself, "Ah! if you only knew what grace 1 have, 1 you would act otherwise." This was at once impure, and 1had self...
10  that my works would do more than other peoples. But  then it struck me at once that one is servant to another,1 and ou...
11of which he himself knew nothing. And from the com­parison one discovers that it is . . . thy gracious handthat causes t...
12     [A phrase in the Swedish Common Prayer Book,the beginning of the Confession.]     So the thought [of the words] "1,...
13open my eyes, and be awake, and then again enter thestate, 1 saw and observed that the inward and actual joycame from th...
14is the Holy Spirit, which is represented by water; for it iscalled water or wave.    [92] ln fine, when a man is in the ...
15 Afterwards 1went out and found myself detained several times by aspecter which held me ail down the back. At last it di...
16 shiverings and 1 heard time after time a heavy muffled sound, but did not know whence it came.     [99] Afterwards, whe...
17know of nothing but my own unworthiness and that 1am a miserable creature, which torments me. And bythis 1 see how unwor...
18and cried out. When our mother came she assumed atotally different mien and a different speech, the signi­fication of wh...
19which is in Jesus Christ, overlooks it. [110] Yes, 1 haveoften observed that the whole of our will that we havegot, that...
20Also, of the fact that in ecstasy or trance the man holdshis breath; at this time the thoughts are, in a manner ofspeaki...
21 was as 1 had said. [ 115] Signification 1 believe is this: the gold signifies what is good and pleasing to God; one mus...
22grace to be able to be thine, and that in nought l be leftto myself.                            [April] 13-14.   [119] T...
23fixed on this that whenever 1 lost this out of mythoughts and inward sight 1 fell into tempting thoughts.God be praised,...
24of covetousness and perhaps of other things; also that 1am pursuing my anatomical speculations.   [126] It seemed to me ...
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Emanuel Swedenborg

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Em swedenborg-the-journal-of-dreams-1744-j-j-g-wilkinson-1860-william-ross-woofenden-1974-studia-swedenborgiana-vol-1-number-1-4-compiled-into-one-vol-complete-n°-1-286

  1. 1. SWEDENBORGSJOURNAL OF DREAMS 1743-1744 Edited from the original Swedish by G. E. Klemming Translated into English (in 1860) by J. J. G. WilkinsonNow for the first time edited for the press by William Ross Woofcnden
  2. 2. StudlaSlOedenborglana Published intermittently by the Swedenborg School ojReligionVoU January 1974 Number 1 "The Period of Transition [1743-47] in the Life of Emanuel Swedenborg": how from being a scientist and philos­ opher he became a theo1ogian and seer. -Wm. R. Woofenden The Journal ofDreams [Part 1] • -Emanuel Swedenborg A private diary kept by Swedenborg during 1743-44. In it he not only re­ corded his dreams and visions with complete candor, he also for the most part interpreted and analyzed them. This English version was translated by James John Garth Wilkinson in 1860 but has never heretofore been pub­ lished.
  3. 3. SWEDENBORG SCHOOL OF RELIGION Established in 1866 by the General Convention of the New Jerusalem Incorporated in 1881 as the New Church Theological School In the latter half of the 18th century, a scientist and philosopher named EmanuelSwedenborg [1688-1772] wrote extensively from a theological viewpoint suggesting arevolu tion in Christian life and thought, centering in the assertion that the spiritual worldis compellingly present in the natural. Sharers of this vision fonn a small but worldwidechurch which foresees and hopes to contribu te toward a revitalization of Christianity. Today, as the Lord cornes into mens lives in new ways with a rekindling power wltichis reflected in scientific and social fennen t as weil as in a pervasive rethinking of the mis­sion of the church, the Swedenborgian perspective presents exciting new challenges forChristian service. The General Convention of the New Jerusalem, dedicated to this vision for thechurch, maintains the Swedenborg School of Religion to prepare a trained and conse­crated ministry for this age of crisis. In addition to titis basic role, the school also seeksto be a corn munity of scholars and to serve as a center for Swedenborgian research. Assuch, it stands ready to enroll as special students persons interested in scholarly pursuitswhich may or may not lead to professional ministry. STUDIA SWEDENBORG/ANA STUD/A SWEDENBORG/ANA is an occasional magazine devoted to philosoplticaland theological concepts found in, or related to, the writings of Emanuel Swedenborg.Its aim is to serve as an international forum of scholarly and critical thought, con tempo­rary as weil as retrospective. Although it is anticipated that the contents of this publica­tion will be widely varied both in scope and subject matter, every effort will be made toavoid its becoming protean in principle. Editar William Ross Woofenden, Ph.D. Editorial Board Edwin G. Capon, MDiv.; George F. Dole, Ph.D.; Marian 1. Kirven, M.A.; Robert H. Kirven, Ph.D.; Calvin E. Turley, D.Min.; Owen T. Turley, M.Div. Publication Offices 48 Sargent St., Newton, Mass. 02158STUD/A SWEDENBORG/ANA is sent free to Iibraries of the member scilOols of theArnerican Association of Theological Schools and other selected libraries, and to S,yeden­borgian or New-Church clergymen in all parts of the world. Copies for other interestedpersons are available at the cost of 75 cents a copy plus postage.
  4. 4. Emanuel Swedenborg
  5. 5. 3 THE PERIOD OF TRANSITION * The story of how, from being a scientist and naturalphilosopher, Swedenborg became a theologian and seer,has been told weil and often. In The Swedenborg Epie(Bookman, 1952) Cyriel Sigstedt calls it "The TurningPoint." Inge Jonsson, in his recent study, Swedenborg,(Twayne, 1971), speaks of it as "The Religious Crisis."ln Emanuel Swedenborg, Seientist and Mystie (Yale, 1948) Signe Toksvig describes it as "The Great Vision." Here-beyond the recording of the basic facts-weshall be less concerned with rehearsing the details andminutiae than has usually been the case. We shall becontent to try to state plainly what, according to Swe-denborgs own testimony, happened in his life in the ------~mid-174üs which so completely changed his lifeworkplans-a change so dramatic that historians and otherwriters have for the most part identified him either as amystic or as a writer of occult religious ideas. By andlarge his monumental scientific and philosophie studieshave been completely ignored. We shall attempt to statewhy. The fact that no two biographers or annota tors ofSwedenborgs life seem to be in full agreement as to howmany key dates one should enumerate in his transitionperiod, nor even precisely which ones are most signifi-cant, in one sense accrues to my benefit. For 1 feel quitefree to make my own selection on the basis of my ownbest judgment. It is my conclusion that the transition began aboutOctober, 1743, and was completed by June, 1747.Three events of crucial importance occurred between*Adapted in part from the editors doctoral dissertation, SwedenbôrgsPhilosophy of Causality.
  6. 6. 4 h -!}- ~~ J ~these inclusive dates~, 1744 in July, 1744; andin April, 1745. Two of these events come within thecompass of the Journal of Dreams, the first instalJmentof which document forms the main part of this issue. Swedenborg was prone to keep diaries and logs of theevents and day-to-day thoughts of his varied life. Themost ambitious consecutive journal of this type spansthe years 1747-1765 and filJs five volumes in Englishtranslation under the name The Spiritual Diary. The onewhich is to be our principal concern is one of the smalJerones and it survives only in fragmentary form. It waswritten mainly in Swedish and was first known as Swe­denborgs Drbmmar. Since the 1918 English version it - -has become best known as the Journal of Dreallls. ------ It is from an entry in this diary that we establish ourfirst key date, October,l1.13. In his entry for the night --of April 17-18, 1744, Swedenborg wrote in part: ... With Gods grace 1 had a preternatural sleep; and this has been the case now for an entire hallyear. [Em phasis added.] From this testimony we are able to conclude that thestate of "preternatural sleep," i.e .. sleep characterizedby dreams and visions of a supernatural or psychic na­ture, began to be a "regular" state about ~..J~- 7...4.3.In todays terminology, one might simply state that atthat time, the scientist began to become aware that hewas a psychic. This awareness first came through dreams.As was true of almost every facet of his life, even hisdreams were often employed pragmatically. For exam­pie, several en tries in the Journal of Dreams compriseinterpretations of dreams which are directly applicableto the particular treatise he was working on in his wak­ing hours at that time. One such dream he construed asadvice to be heeded regarding the freC]uent and lengthy
  7. 7. footnotes of his Regnwn Animale (The Hague ~Ind Lon­don, 1744-5): ... It meant ... that J ought to draw in my sails and not make the notes so long. * These clreams, in short. becal11e one of the dominantstrains of his thought lire. significantly affecting his atti ­tudes towarcl and handling of his monographs. The serniotic use of clreams proved to be only a pre­lude or precursor of what was still to come. The nextmajor event contributing to the transition came in thelorin of an experience which was apparently midwaybetween a dream ancl a vision. The occurrence is record­eli under the date of the night of April 6-7..:.J2±4. Thecomplexities of the account need not be entered here.Let it suftïce that our author. on that night. while in astate which he c1escribecl as being "neither sleeping norawake" (perhaps what woulcl now be called a hypno­gogic state). experiencecl what he was convincecl was aChrist-vision. He wrote of it in part: ... 1 perceived that it was the Son of God Himself who descended with sllch a resounding noise which by itself prostrated me to the grollnd ... It is probably superfluous to comment that thisproved to be both Cl frightening and a humbling experi ­ence. Apparently the preceuing period of frequent pre­tern,ltural sleep had so conJitioned his thinking that.once the initial shock passed. he never once Joubted thegenuine nature of the vision. Part of the record of thatsame amazing night rends: Laler on, about day-break. 1 lcil asleer again. and had continllally in my thoughts hillYiJuisl conjoins Hi!0:.lf*April 1-2. 1744. (VOl/Id III~I "1I111 IIIOOlrIl pllil,"opll"r, lud ",dldrlal1ls~ )
  8. 8. 6 ~n; holy thoughts came, but of such a nature that they are unfathamable, far 1 cannat in the least express by the pen what then took place; for 1 only know that 1 was in such thoughts. There does not seem to be any clear statement extantof how Swedenborg interpreted the meaning and pur­pose of this vision at the time it happened. The most heseemed ready to conclude at that time was that he wasin need of greater faith and a more humble attitude.Many years later, however, in retrospect he understand­ably spoke of the events of that night as a part of thetotal process which constituted his "caU" to serve as arevelator. But it does not seem that he had any but themost obscure of ideas in ApriL 1744, as to the meaningof this strange occurrence. About three months later, another dream-vision is re­corded. Again it is obviously to be considered as morethan a dream. It was another mystical experience of"seeing" a supernatural being. This time, however, itwas not the Christ. This visitor. he said, "must havebeen a holy ange!." 1 include this in my list of key tran­sitional events for a reason which probably will not seemcogent without some explanation. It is included simplybec:wse, so far as 1 can determine, this was Swedenborgsfirst recognizable and annotated confrontation by a"spirit. " It is not at ail clear lrom the diary entry why the manwhom Kant later lampooned as a "spirit-seer" felt hecould so positively at that time identify his nocturnalguest as a "holy ange!." What the man certainly did nothave the least inkling of then was that; beginning veryshortly (according to his later testimony) he was to havefrequent, open, and often prolonged intercourse withspirits and angels: ie.. human inhabitants of the "other"
  9. 9. 7 world. It is, in fact, precisely this claim of such com­ munication which earned Swedenborg the label of "mys­ tic" or "writer of occult religious ideas." It is for this reason that 1 have chosen to include in this article a mention of the first such encounter of which our subject seemed clearly to be cognizant. As such it would appear to be of considerable importance in his transition from scientist and philosopher to theologian and seer. The last of the events which 1 have singled out as be­ing especially revealing of the causes behind the radicalchange in vocation occurred the next spring-the best evidence seeming to place it in ~r~~ l74D This experi­ence, unquestionably the climactic one for our author,strangely is nowhere described in detail by Swedenborghimself, although he alludes to it more than once in hiswritings. We are dependent on two second-hand ac­counts which do not agree in ail details (although oneclaims to include a verbatim statement given by per­sonal interview). Nevertheless, this lack of fully docu­mented and detailed evidence may not be as critical asone might at first glance think it would be. What is clearis that something truly momentous happened to theman which included (1) ~._s_~~Ond_~h!I~~on,and (2) adivine commission for a new life work. That the worldre;;(;ted, and often continuestoreact, negatively to theadmittedly astonishing claim that such a twofold occur­rence actually took place, does not alter the fact of thecataclysmic effect it had on the subject who contendedthat he had such an experience. -- The writer of one of the accounts mentioned above, along-time personal friend of Swedenborgs, a man ofgreat personal integrity named Carl Robsahm, states thenature of the commission succinctly as fotlows: He [Swedenborg] said that . . . He [Christ] had
  10. 10. 8 chosen me to declare to men the spiritual contents of Scripture; and tha t He Himsel f would declare to me wha t l should write on this subject. That this experience truly marked the transition to anew vocation is testified to by Robsahm, again, accord­ing to him, lrom a transcript of an actual conversationwith Swedenborg. He quotes the seer as saying: From that day l gave up the study of worldJy science, and labored in spiritual things, according as the Lord had commanded me to write. Afterwards the Lord opened, daily very often, my bodiJy eyes, so that, in the middle of the day 1 could see into the other world, and in astate of perfect wakefulness converse with angels and spirits* Following this staggering experience-although it wasto be almost two years before he asked to be retired athall salary lrom his post with the Swedish Board ofMines-Swedenborg commenced an all110st feverish nUI11­ber of new activities: Biblical studies. including inten­sive rcacquaintance with his long-neglected college He­brew; the compiling of a detailed Bible index: tentativeexercises in Scripture interpretation (resulting in. amongother things, an eight-volume preliminary exegeticaltreatment of a large part of the Old Testament), and, byno means least, a prolonged introspective examinationof his personal ambivalence toward his new "col11mis­sion"-a process which would probably be described as"soul-searching" today. ~t length he apparently found the inner resourcesneeded to accept with equanimity the new life whichthis task would open up for him. Then the quite matter­of-fact but orderly step was taken of resigning lrom hismain employment, that of an assessor for the Royal Col­lege of Mines. where he had served off and on for thirty"Both of the above e.ccrpts are cited in Documents Concerning Sweden­borJ(, edited by R. H. Tafel (London, 1875), Vol. l, p. 36.
  11. 11. 9years. A number of times before he had asked for tem-porary leaves of absence, from a few days to a full year.This time he made it c1ear, in his petition to the king, that he wished to be irrevocably released from his officeso that he might devote his full attention to the impor-tant work which he had already begun. His request, dated June 2, 1747, was acceded to; hewas retired at half salary, and, although he con tinued tomain tain a livcly in terest in civil affairs-continuing tobe an active member of the Swedish house of nobles formany years-his full-time employment now became thatof revela tor. He was fifty-nine years old. Yet he beganhis new career with an indefatigable ebullience whichhas astounded his biographers. He lived to be eighty-four, and during the remaining quarter-century of his lifeproduced in Latin a set of theological writings which inEnglish translation occupy sorne thirty volumes. AI-though such comparisons are not very meaningful, it isnevertheless true tha t his ou tpu t of theological studiesla te in life is roughly eq uivalen t in bulk to his earlieroutput of scientific and philosophie works. One needsabout an eight- or nine-foot shelf to hold the lot. What remains to be said is something on the general·attitudes that have beenassumed concerning Sweden-borg and his works. It has often been attested to histori-cally that anyone who lays c1aim to being the recipientof a special body of information-special in the sense ofbeing somehow "revealed"-is generally looked ataskance, or classified as a "mystic" and therefore not tobe read except by the "expert," or openly denounced asa person victimized by his own hallucinations, or-rarely-read and judged on the merit of the thought-content. There could, of course, be various other options. Butone or more of the above "usual" responses has been
  12. 12. 101~1l"gdy responsible for the fact that the scholarly world,both in the physical sciences and in the humanities, hasrLlllained l<.lrgely ignorant of the vast creditable and his­toriL~llly significant corpus produced by Swedenborg.This. it seems. is an unfortunate loss to the world of;!L;ldeille. This publication is seen by its editor as oneIllodest attempt to al1eviate this ignorance, to breakdown the prejudicial barrier, and caU to the attention ofthe scholarly world the works of a gifted and amazingIllan.
  13. 13. SWEDENBüRGSJOURNAL OF DREAMS 1743-1744 Edited from the original Swedish by G. E. Klemming Translated into English (in 1860) by J. J. G. WilkinsonNow for the first time edited for the press by William Ross Woofenden 1~/3- t«(llp
  14. 14. 13 PREFACE Tü T~! SW~DI~~ The Royal Library in Stockholm purchased a short time ago [October 1858] the original manuscript that contains the principal contents of this little volume. It had previously long Iain concealed in the possession of R. Scheringsson, Professor and Master in Vesteras [inthe Grammar School there], who died in J 849 at theage of 90; and it continued hidden among his papers fornearly ten years more after his decease, and was ulti­mately offered for sale to the Royal Library. Thus farour knowledge extends of the history of the manuscript. The manuscript is contained in a cornmon memo­randum book in small octavo, bound in parchment afterthe fashion of the last century, and provided with wrap­pers and pockets on both sides. The leaves are at present69 in number; but some leaves, probably not written on,have bcen tom out: of those which remain, there iswriting on only 54 of them; or more exactly speaking,on 104 pages. The first leaves are occupied with notesof a journey to The Hague inQ2.43) whither Swedenborgwent to superintend the printing of the commencementof the Animal Kingdom; and to write the continuationof the same work. The notes of travel are however soonbrought to an end, and are succeeded by accounts de­rived from the world of dream and vision, althoughamong the latter there are also scattered notices of theexternat and actual life. Embracing as they do the tran­sition period in Swedenborgs life-the transition fromthe worldly to the spiritual-they are of great value inhelping us to a judgment of his spiritual condition.which they show us to have been one of singular agita­tion and upheaval, enabling us to penetra te his state withdeeper gaze than was possible hitherto. Nevertheless.
  15. 15. A facsimile ofpage 57 of Swedenborgs original manuscript.
  16. 16. 15 the editor deals solely with the subject in the interest of literary history, and confines his office to the task of of­ fering this document just as he finds it. The thoughtful reader will easily form his own conclusions; and for the rest, we may be assured there will be no lack of com­mentators. The editor has also made use of this opportunity toappend to these Documents certain other original papersof Swedenborg either unknown or but little known upto the present time. * Arnong these in the first placemay be mentioned those parts of the Diarium Spiritualewhich are left out as undecipherable in Tafels edition.These may the more fairly be included here, because thedreams and visions from 1744 may be regarded as thefirst part of this la ter diary. With regard to the mannerof the editing, 1 have perhaps exceeded in exactness, inhaving distinguished by Italic type the numerous lettersand parts of words which were indicated but not sup­plied in the manuscript. However, in dealing with apiece of writing executed with so little care, and conse­quently often so dubious in its expressions and so diffi­cult to read, 1 have preferred to incur the charge of over­exactness rather than the contrary; the more particlilarlybecause 1 would give no ground to the suspicion of anypurposed falsification of my materi,t1s. Words and lettersomitted in the manuscript are in my ec!ition placed inbrackets: so also are emendations of words wlOngJy writ­ten. Whole words and longer portions printed in Italicsare in the original underlined. In behalf of the 311tl1en­ticity of the manuscript and the fidelity of the printedto the written matter the editor refers the reader to thephotograph of page 57 of the original: and also to the*The other works mentioned have ail long since appeared in English. andtherefore are omilted in this printing.
  17. 17. 16annexed certificate of our distinguished reader of manu­scripts, Herr F. A. Dahlgren, amanuensis in our StatePaper Office, who has had the kindness to assist me inreading the pro_or.s, !.-l].d with his usual penetration andingenuity has successfu11y guessed many of the wordswhich were so hard to decipher. It now only remains to mention and justify thesma11ness of the number of copies printed. The peculiarcontents of the document, which might easily bring it incollision with our laws regulating the press, furnish thereason which has prevented us from disseminating thebook unaltered among the general public. In conse­quence, it is now sent only to sorne enlightened thinkerswho happen to be interested in the subject. In order notto exceed the prescribed hundred copies, the edition islimited to 99, a11 of which are numbered. G. E. K/emming *********** At the request of Herr Klemming, Second Librarianin the Royal Library, 1 have compared the fo11owingpages 1-64 with the original manuscript in Swedenborgsown handwriting, and 1 certify hereby to the entire fi­delity of the printed copies, so far as it was possible todecipher with certainty a hand often difficult to read. F. A. Dahlgren. Stockholm. June 4, 1859
  18. 18. i7 PREF ACE TO THIS EDITION Gustaf Klemming, editor of the J 859 edition, was anavowed enemy of Swedenborgiiuiism as a religion. butgreatly interested in it as what he considered it to be,viz., a strange venture into the occuit. The following ye~LJ~§O) a group of New Church­men (Swedenborgians) in Sweden published a secondSwedish edition with a 24-page preface of "Reflectionson the lately discovered dreams of Swedenborg." Al­though this preface was unsigned, the writer has beenidentified as a Lady Anna Frederika Ehrenborg. She ex­plained in the Reflections that Swedenborg was passingthrough a personal crisis during the time he hastilyscribbled the contents of this Journal. thus helping thereader to view the work with a better perspective. A,J.ill.rQ Swedish edit)on e~it~.g. by Knut..êYr ~ltS pub­li~hed .in Stockho.!.Jr1 in 19~4. It included commentaryon the Journal as weil as a biographical sketch of Swe­denborg. A fourth corn lete edition was published in 1952 by - ~------Wahlstrom & Widstrand, Stockholm with Per ErikWahlund as editor. A slightly revised 5th edition withconsiderably enlarged body of notes was issued by thesame publisher and editor in 1964. The first English translation-and to da!~ly li (complete English trans!ation-was that of . ~----- r. Wilkinson, -_._----­which we now for the first time are putting in print. Apirated and abridged version of Wifkinsons translat,ioll.which claimed to be the work of a Baron Holmfeld ofDenmark. appeared in a London monthly. "The Dawn,"in 1861-62. Later this version was reprinted in a paperpu bl ished at La Porte. 1nd iana. called "The Crisis." Dr.R. L. Tafel. in his 1875 3-vol. DoeUil/llits COllcernill,!!.
  19. 19. 18Swedenborg, methodically exposed the plagiaristic na­ture of the purported new translation of Holm feld. In the course of his expose, Dr. Tafel was moved totranslate and print, as Document 209, a large part of thecontents of the 1743-44 diary. However, he omittedmost of the entries before March 24, 1744, and alsoseveral sections which he apparently felt were too expli­cit or indelicate for the average reader. (When the Odh­ner version appeared, these latter sections were included,but only after the editor had translated them intoLatin!) Although Tafel introduced a paragraph numberingsystem (which is common to most of Swedenborgsworks), the next English translator found he had to re­version ap~ in 1918, the work of Carl Th. Odhner.~------.., - - -number the work to allow for the Tafel omissions. This - -and has become the standard for references to this work.For that reason, Odhners numbering_ system has beenadopted for this printing. They appear in the text insquare brackets. Wm. R. Woofendell. Nov. 1973.
  20. 20. s V E 1~ E ~ B 0 1{- t 8 nH()YM R r l-ti ll~ l~U l UU~. Ul 11ba.l1~~ Il ~V"""l... t Il ~I "Iall..., ""-ni. l "tif. ~,"« Facsimile of original Swedish lille page. 1
  21. 21. 21 [1] *G~~the 21st of July, 1 travelled from Stock­ holm, arrived on the 27th at Ysta~, after passing through Talje, Nykoping, Norrkoping, Linkoping, Grenna, and J onkoping. In Ystad 1 met the Countess de la Gardie, . ­ with her two daughters, and the two counts, Count Fer­ sen, Major Landtishusen and Magister Klingenberg. On the 31 st General Stenflycht arrived with his son, andCapt. Schachta. [2] The wind was against us, and we did not sail tillthe 5th of August; 1 was in company with General Sten­flycht. On the 6th we reached Stralsund, and early onthe 7th entered the town. The countess and the generalcontinued their joumey the same day. [3] ln Stralsund 1 again visited the fortress fromBadenthore, to Francken, Stripseer and Kniperthore,and the house where King Charles XII lodged, the Mejer­feldz palace; the churches of St. Nicholas; of St. James,which was laid in ruins during the siege; and of St. Mary.1 paid a visit to Colonel and Commandant SweJjn, Su­perintendent Loper, and Postdirector Crivits. In St.Nicholas Church a timepiece is shown which was struckby lightning in 1670, 1683, and 1688, just as the handpointed to 6:00. 1 afterwards visited sorne new fortifi­cations outside Kniperthore. 1 met Carl Jesper Benze­lius. Visited the waterworks that supply the town: theyconsist of two sets of pipes. [4] The 9th of August, travelled from Stralsundthrough Damgarten: through the Mecklenburg territorypast Rimnits, to Rostock, where 1 visited eight churches,five large and three small, a c10ister for ladies, eight innumber, who however are not under rules of restraint. [5] From there 1 joumeyed to Wismar, where thereare six churches, the best are those of St. Mary and St.-The paragraph numbering is that adopted by C. Th. Odhner in his 1918English translation.
  22. 22. ÎÎGeorge. Thence on the Il th; and on the way visited Gade­buch, the scene of the battle between the Swedes andDanes; afterwards to Ratzeburg; which is surrounded byswamp, over which a long bridge leads into the town. [6] On the 12 th came to Hamburg, and took up myquarters in the Keisershof. The Countess de la Gardiewas staying in the same hotel. Met Baron Hamilton,Reuterhom, Trivalt, Konig, Assessor Awerman: waspresented to Prince Augustus, his royal highness bro­ther, who talked Swedish: afterwards was presented by the Grand Marshal Lesch to his Royal Highness AdolphFredrich; delivered the manuscripts 1 had with me, andwhich are for the press. and at the same time showed thereviews of the former works. [7] The 17th, travelled from Hamburg, over the riverto Buxtehude, where, for the space of <1 mile 1 saw theprettiest country 1 had seen in Germany; the route I<lYthrough a continuous garden of <Ipples. pears. plu ms.walnuts, chestnut trees, limes and elms. [8] The 18th, to Bremen, with its fine ramp<lrts andsuburbs; the best of these is NystadL by the bridge lead­ing thither, there are no less than eleven water mills. oneby the side of the other. Visited the town house in themarket place, and also the great Rolan [belfry]. whichis the sign of a free town: afterwards went to St. Nicho­las and the cathedral churches; was also in the hospitalwhere there are several statues. [9] 20th, from Bremen to Leer, through Oldenburg,which is a country belonging to the King of Denmark;fine fortifications, with plenty of water about them;went also through Neuskants: at Lee .. there is a fortwhich is called Leerort, which is in the possession ofHolland. Thencc to Groningen. which is <1 large town.
  23. 23. 23under the Prince of Orange. At Leewarden 1 saw hispalace, as well as his mothers; the latter is ca lied thePrincess Palace; visited also the hotel de ville, and otherplaces. 1 came here by Treckscheut [passenger boats onthe Du tch canals d raw n by horses. Trans/ator J. [IOJ From Grbningen there is a choice of two routes,namely, to Harlingen, and to Lemmer; to the former,the mode of conveyance is by Treckscheut; to the latter,by coach. 1 chose the way to Harlingen through Lewar­den. From Harlingen, which is a large town ... [the con­tinuation is missing. ft is impossible to decide whetherit was ever written, or not, for the word stad (town)concludes the sixth page, and th en come several blankleaves: yet it is probable that sorne leaves (4?) have beentorn out. On the shreds that remain of two that havebeen cut out, there are large numeral figures written inan unpracticed hand, perhaps a child s. Editor. J [11] 1. Dreamed of my YOllth and the Gustavian family. 2. In Venice, of the beautiful palace. 3. In Sweden, of the white expanse of heaven. 4. In Leipsic, of one that lay in boiling water. S. Of one that tumbJed with a chain down into the deep. 6. Of the king that gave away so precioLis a thing in a peasants cabin. 7. Of the man servant that wished me to go away on my travels. [12] 8. Of my delights during the nights. Won ­ dered at myself for having nothing left to do for my own honor, so that 1 was even tOllched. Also at not being nt ail inclined towards the sex. as 1 had previously been
  24. 24. 24 ail my life. 9. How 1 was ln wak ing trances nearly the whole time. [13] la. How 1 set myselfagainst the spirit. And how 1 then favored it, but found afterwards thatit was madness, devoid of alliife and connection. And that thus a quantity of what 1 have written mustbe of the same kind; because 1 had not at ail resisted thepower of the spirit to that degree; inasmuch as the faultsare ail my own, but the truths are not mine. Indeed 1 sometimes fell into impatience and intothoughts [doubts], and would fain have given way to in­solent demand whenever the matter did not go so easilyas 1 wished. as 1 did nothing for my own sake: but 1 wasa long way from finding out my own unworthiness. orbeing grateful for mercies. [14] Il. How 1 found. after 1 arrived at The Hague.that my interest. and self love in my work. had passedaway; at which 1 myself wondered. How the inclination to the other sex so suddenlyceased which had been my strongest passion. How 1 had. during the whole time. the best sleep (ltnights, which was more than kincl. How my trances were. before and after sleep. My clear thoughts about things. [15J How 1 set myselfagainst the power of the HolySpirit. what happened thereupon: how 1 saw hideousspecters. without life horribly shrouded and rnoving intheir shrouds: together with a beast that attacked me.but not the child. [16] It seemed 1 layon a mountain with a guJf underit: there were knolls upon it; 1 lay there and tried tohelp myself up, holding by a knoll, without foothold: agulf was below. It signifies, that 1 myself wish to help
  25. 25. myself from the abyss of heli, which is not possible tobe done. [17] How a woman laid down by my side, just as if 1was waking. 1 wished to know who it was. She spokeslowly; said that she was pure, but that 1 smelled il!. Itwas my guardian angel, as 1 believe, for then began thetemptation. Ô. March 24-25. [18] 1. Stood behind a machine, that was set in mo­tion by a wheeI; the spokes entangled me more and moreand carried me up so that it was impossible to escape;wakened. Signifies either that 1 ought to be kept morestrictly; or perhaps it referred to the lungs of the fetusin the womb, about which 1 was writing immediatelyafterwards, [or] both. [19] 2. Was in a garden which had many divisions;pretty; of these 1 wished to possess one for myself; butlooked about to see if there was any way to get out. Itappeared to me that 1 saw one, and thought of another.There was a person who picked away a number of invisi­ble creeping things, and killed them; he said they werebugs, which someone had dropped there and thrown in.and which infested the people there. 1 did not see them.but saw another little creeping thing which 1 dropped ona white linen cloth beside a woman. It was the unclean­ness which ought to b~ noted out from me. [20] 3. Descended a great staircase, which ended ina ladder; freely and boldly; below there was a hok.which led down into a great abyss. It was difficult toreach the other side without faJling into the hole. Tl1erewere on the other side persons to whom 1 reached I11Yhand, to help me over, wakened. Signifies the danger 1am in of falling into hell, if 1 do not get help.
  26. 26. 26 [21] 4. Spoke with our successor in Sweden (whowas turned into a woman) freely and familiarly; after­wards with Carl Brockman, bidding him beware of him;he answered something. Spoke with Erland 8roman, and told him 1 was hereagain. Do not at aIl know what it means, unIess some­thing of the following. [22] 5. Came into a magnificent room and spokewith a lady who was a court attendant; she wished totell me something; then the queen entered, and wentthrough into another apartment. It seemed to me it wasthe same that had represented our successor. 1 went out,for 1 was very meanly dressed, having just come off ajoumey; a long old overcoat without hat or wig. 1 won­dered that she deigned to come after me. She said thata person had given to his mistress ail the jewels; but hegot them back in this manner; it was told to her that hehad Dot given the best; then she threw the jewels away. [23] She asked me to come in again; but 1 excusedmyself on the ground of being so shabbily dressed, andhaving no wig: 1 must first go home. She said it was ofno consequence. It means that 1 should then write andbegin the epilogue to the second part, to which 1 wishedto put a prologue, but it is not needed. 1 did accord­ingly. What she related about the jewels means truths,!which are reveal.ed to a man, but are withdrawn again;for she was angry because she did not get ail. 1 after­wards saw the jewels in hands, and a great ruby in themiddle of them. [March] 25-26 [24] It seemed 1 took a key, went in, was examinedby the door keeper as to what keys 1 had; showed themail; also as to whether 1 should have two. But it seemed
  27. 27. 27 that Hesselius had another. 1 was taken in to custody, and watched. Many people came to me in vehicles. ft seemed to me that 1 had done nothing wrong. Yet it came to mind that it might look suspicious if it was asked how it happened that 1 had taken the key. Wakened. Many significations: as, that 1 had taken the key to anatomy; the other, that Hesselius had, was the key ta medicine. Aiso that the key to the lungs is the pulmonary artery, which is thus the key to ail the mo­ tion of the body, or it may be interpreted spiritually. [25] 1 entreated a cure for my sickness; a ot of rags were given me to buy; 1 took the half of them, and selected from the other half; but gave the rags ail back again. He said that he himself would buy me something that would serve for a cure. It was J)1Y bodl"s_tho~:ghts that were the rags wherewith 1 would cure myself; but it was no good. [26] Came out afterwards, and saw many black im­ ages; a black one was thrown to me: 1 saw that it could not fit to the foot. ft meant that natural reason cou Id] never harmonize with spiritual, 1 believe. [March] 30-31. (27] Saw a number of women; one who was writing a letter. Took iL but do not know where it went. She was sitting, and a yellow man smote her upon the back; he wished that she should have more stripes; but this was enough. ft concerns. so 1 believe, what 1 am writing. and have written; our philosophy. [28] Saw also a very lovely woman as it were beside a window there. where a child was placing roses. She took me by the hand and led me. ft betokens what 1 am writing: <Ibo my tonnent. that would lead me; so 1 be­
  28. 28. 28 lieve. (29) Saw a procession of men; magnificent;jewelled; so fine that 1 never saw anything finer; but it disap­ peared soon. It was, as 1 believe, experience, which now is in great luxuriance. * April 1-2. (30) Rode in the air on horseback. Went into ail the rooms, kitchen, and the rest, and sought after a particu­ lar person; but found nothing. The rooms were badly swept and cared for. At last, 1 was carried in the air into a hall; there 1 got two pieces of beautiful bread, and so 1 again got him [whom 1 sought]. Here there were a num­ ber of people, and a well-swept room. Signifies the Lord s Supper. [31] King Charles sat in a dark room, and spoke something, but very indistinctly; afterwards asked a per­ son at the table if he had not heard what he had asked. He said, "Yes." Afterwards he shut the window, and 1 helped him with the curtains. After this 1 got up on a horse, but by no means took the way 1 thought, but rode over hills and mountains; rode fast; a heavy load fol­ lowed on to me; 1 cou Id not succeed in riding away, the horse got tired with the load, and 1 would have him put in to sorne one. He came in, and the horse became like a slaugh tered and bJood-red beast, and lay there. Betok­ ens that 1 have got ail that 1 had thought for my instruc­ tion; and that 1 am taking a way which is perhaps not the right one. The Joad was my remaining works that followed me, that on the way became of that kind, 1 weary and dead. [32] St~ped out of a coach; the coach was driven *Odhners translation reads: "It was, as 1 believe, experimental science which now is greatly in fashion."
  29. 29. 29 into a lake; as he was driving it in, the coachman called out to the other coach to take care: there was also dan­ ger wh en he drove in. 1 looked at the other coach. There seemed to be a screen at the back of it, which was spread out as a screen is [Iike a fan]. 1, in concert with a man that sat at the back, took the screen, went in, and bound it together. Meaning was, that the beginning of my work was difficult; the second coach was warned and bid to take care: presages also that 1 ought to draw the sails together, to furl them; and not make the notes so long. * [April] 2-3. [33] There came two persons. They came into a house which was not yet ready, but the building fin­ ished. They went round about it, and did not appear at ail pleased with it. We saw that our force was not with us, and feared them. One came to me, and said that they had a punishment for me on the next Maundy Thursday, if 1 did not take myself off. 1 did not know how to get out. He said he would show me the way. Wakened.1/ Means that 1, in an unprepared and unswept cabin had invited a visit from the Highest; and that he found it unswept; ought to be punished; but most graciously the way was shown me to escape their wrath. [34] [It seemed there] was a beggar, tha t cried ou t that he would have bacon; they wished to give him something else, but he continually cried out, "Bacon!" Wakened. Same signification, 1 believe. [35] Saw two batches of soldiers, blue; they marched in two bodies past my window. which stood ajar. 1 *A reference to his work then in progress. Reg/lll/li 11/1illlo/e, J work with many lengthy footnotes.
  30. 30. 30 wished to look out on the first body that marched, which appeared to me to be magnificent. Wakened. It is a gracious guard, to prevent me from perishing. N.B. April 3-4, 1744, which was the day before Easter. [36] Found nothing during the whole night, though 1 often wakened. Believed ail was away, and settled, and that 1 was left, or driven off. About the morning it seemed, that 1 rode, and it was shown me where to go; but wh en 1 looked, it was dark. Found that in the dark­ ness 1 had gone astray; but then the light came, and 1 saw that 1 was astray. Saw the way, and the forests and groves to which 1 ought to go, and behind them the sky. Wakened. Then came the thought of itself about the fifst life and, in consequence, about the other life; and it seemed to me that ail is full of grace. Began weeping( because 1 had not loved at ail but instead hadcoiitin­1 ually angered him that had led me and had shown me, the way that leads at last to the kingdom of grace; and because 1 had grown unworthy to be taken to grace. [April] 4-5. Went to Gods table. [37] It was told me that a courier was now come. 1 said that it might be, that [ail the rest is crossed out with the pen]. A tune was sung, and a line 1 remember of the hymn: Jesus is my best of friends Jesus tir min wan then baste It seemed to me that the buds had bUfst, and were green.
  31. 31. 31 [April] 5-6. [38] Easter day was the 5th of April. On that day l vent to Gods table. The temptation still continued, principally after dinner ti1l 6 oclock, but nothing defi ­ nite. It was a wretchedness as of final condemnation, and as of being in hell. Still there was always the hope that the Holy Spirit gave; and strength therein, as in ( Paul, Romans 5: 5. The evil one had power given him to make the innermost uneasy with va rio us thoughts. [39) At Whitsuntide* after the Lords supper, l was e?,~eedingly happy, and yet outw.é!rdly afflicted. The temptation came in the afternoon, in quite a different way; but strong; for l was assured of having got my sins forgiven, and yet l could by no means restrain my flying thoughts from venting a little, against my better judg ­ ment; which was the work of the evil one, through per­ mission. Prayer, and also Gods Word, calmed down1 these thoughts. Faith was there in full, but trust and confidence and love seemed to be missing. [40] l went to bed at 9:00 oclock. The temptation accompanied with trembling continued Till 10: 30. 1 then fell into a sleep in which the whole of illY telllpta­ tion was represented to me: how Erland Brol11an 111d sought me in different ways, and endeavoretfto get Ille to take his side and to belong to that party (IlIXUr y riches, vanity); but he could not manage to win Ille over. .!II grew more and more resolutely opposed, because he1 treated me with contempt. [41] Afterwards 1 was in strife with a serpent, dark, grey, which lay down, and1(was Bromans dog. 1 struck at it with a club many times, but could never hit it on the head; it was in vain. li tried to bite me, but coulg not. 1 laid hold of it by its *Odhner has corrected this to read "Easter."
  32. 32. 32 open jaws: it could not bite me; nor could 1 do it much harm. At last 1 got it by thejowl and squeezed it hard; also the nose, which 1 squeezed until poison squirted)Iout. 1 said that though the dog was not mine, yet as he had wished to bite me, 1 must correct him. Thereupon he seemed to say that he could not get me to say a word to him; 1 quarreled then with him. When 1 wakened, the words 1 was saying were: "Hold your tongue." [42] From this it is easy to see without further ex­ planation how the temptation was: and how gre~lt Gods grace was on the other side. through the merits of Christ and the working of the Holy Spirit: to whom be honor and glory From eternity [0 eternity. The_thought s~uck me instantly. how great the Lords grace is. which ac­ counts it to us as if we had stooe! against temptation. and attributes it to us as our own; when yet it is only Gods grace and working: is his and nowise ours and he overlooks ail our weakness in the combat. manifold ,IS it has surely been. And moreoverwhat great glory our Lord gives after a [ittle time of adversity. 143] Afterwards 1 slept. and it seemed to me that the whole night in various ways 1 was tïrst brought into asso­ ciation with others. through the sinfulness that cxisted. Afterwards. that 1 was b,ll1daged and wrapped in won­ derful and indescribable courses of circles: showing that during the whole night 1 was inaugurated in a wonderful manner. And then it was said, "Can any Jacobite be more th an honest?" So at iast 1 was received with an embrace. Afterwards it was said that he ought by no means to be called 50. or in the way just named: but in some way which 1 ha<>2 no recollection of, if it were not Jacobite. This [ can by no mealls explain: it was a mys­ tical series. [441 Afterwards [ wakened and slept again many
  33. 33. 33times, and ail was in answer to my thoughts, yet in suchwise that there was su ch a life and such a glory in all that1 can give no account of it in the least; for it was ailheavenly; clear for me at the time; but afterwards 1 canexplain nothing of it. In a word, 1 was in heav.~~dheard speech tllat no human tongue with the life in itcan utter; nor the glory and innermost delight in thetrain of the speech. Except this 1 was in a waking state, as in a heavenlyecstasy, which also is indescribable. [45J At 9:00 oclock 1 lay down in bed, and got upbetween 9:00 and 10:00 in the morning, having be~n - -". -----bed between twelve and thirteen hours. To the Highestbe thanksgiving, honor, praise! HaJiowed be his name:Holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth! [46 J How 1 learned by actual proof the meaning ofthe injunction not to love the angels better than God;a proof which had nearly spoiled the whole work. But inregard to our Lord, no account ought to be taken of anyangel; but in regard to their help, where love is con-cerned, it is a far lower case. [47J 1 found in myself like beams of light that it wasthe greatest happiness to be a martyr in regard to theindescribable grace connected with love to God. whichcauses the subject of it to wish to endure this tonnent.which is nothing in comparison with the everlasting:and makes it the least of things to offer up ones life. ) [48J Had also in my mind and my body a kind ofconsciousness of an indescribable bliss, so that if it hac!been in a higher degree, the body would have been as itwere dissolved in mere bliss. This was the night betweenEaster Sunday and Easter Monday; also the whole ofEaster Monday.
  34. 34. 34 April 6-7. N.B. N.B. N.B. [49] ln the evening 1 came into another sort of temptation, namely, between eight and nine odock in the evening when 1 read Gods miracles performed through Moses, it seemed to me that somewhat of my understanding mixed itself therein; so that 1 could never have the strong faith that 1 ought to have. 1 believed and did not believe; thought that therefore the angels and God showed themselves to shepherds, but never to the philosopher that lets. ~is understanding take part in the matter. The understanding, for instance, is always bent to ask why he used the wind when he calied the locusts together? why he hardened Pharaohs heart? why he did not do ail at once? with more of the like. In my mind 1 did indeed smile at this, but yet did it so much, that faith was by no means steady. [50] 1 looked at the fire, and said to myself: Thus 1 ought also not to believe that the fire exists, and [ought to believe] that the outward(sense~e more fa~~~~s than wha~hi~s~~ys, which is very _truth; 1 ought rather to believe this than myself. In thoughts like those and many more 1 passed the first hour or hour and a half, and in my mind _srr!i~d at the ter~p!er. It is to be noted, that the same day 1 -- went to Delft, and the whole day had the grace to be in de~ spiritual thoug_hts,- so deep and lovely as 1 had never been in before and this, the who le day; which was the work of the spirit which 1 then found with me. [SIl At ten odock 1 went to bed and was somewhat better. Half an hour after 1 heard a noise under my head. 1 thought that the tempt~r was then going away. Straightway there came over me a shu,@ering, so strong from the head downwards and over the whole body, with a noise 0Lthunder, and this happened several times.
  35. 35. 3S l found that something holy was upo~me; [52] 1 then fel! into a sleep, and at about 12:00, 1:00 or 2:00 in the night, there came over me a strong shuddering from head to fo..?t, with a thundering noise as if many winds beat together; which shook me; it was indescribable and pros­ trated me on my face. Then, at the time l was prastrated, at that very moment l was wide awake, and saw that l was cast down. [53] Wondered what it meant. And l spoke as if l were awake; but found nevertheless that the words were put into my mouth. "And oh! Almighty Jesus Christ, that thou, of thy so great mercy, deignest to come to so great a sinner. Make me worthy of thy grace." l held together my hands, and prayed, and then 1 [54] - came forth a hand, which squeezed -;y hands ha;i. Straighrway thereupon 1 continued my prayer, and said, "Thou hast promised to take to grace ail sln­ ner~ th ou canst nothing else than keep thy word." At that same moment, l sat in his bosom, and saw him face .. to face; it was a face of holy mien, and in ail it was in­ describable, and he smiled so tha t 1 believe that his face had indeed been like this when he lived on earth. He spoke to me and ask_ëëïTf1 had a clear bill of health. l answered, "Lord. thou knowest better than 1." "~Il, do so," said_he; that is) as l found it in my mind to sig­ -~ -- nif; lov.e me in reality or do what thou hast promised. God give me grace thereto; 1 found that it was not in my power. Wakened, with shudderings. [55] Feil again1 into such astate that 1 was in thoughts neither sleeping, nor waking. Thought, What can this be? Is it Christ, Gods son, 1 have seen? But it is sin that 1 doubt thereof. But as it is command~....Lhat we shall praye the spirits, s-ol l Jhought it alLo.Y_er and found from what had passed on the previous night that 1 was purified and enwrapped and protected through the whole night by the Holy
  36. 36. 36 Spirit, and in this way prepared hereto; as a1so that 1 fell on my face, and the words 1 spoke; and the prayer, that1 came by no means lrom myself, but t~~d was placed in my mouth; still, that it was 1 that spoke, and 1t_that ail was holy. So 1 found that it was Gods own son, who came down with this thunder, and prostrated me to the ground, lrom himself, and made the prayer, and so, said l, it was Jesus himself. [56] 1 asked for grace, for having so long doubted of this, and also for ~ing let it come into my thoughts to ask for a miracle, which 1 found was unbecoming. Thereupon 1 fell to prayer and asked only for grace. More than this 1 did not utter. yet afterwards 1 entreated and prayed to have love. which is Jesus Christs work. and none of mine. Meantime. shud­ derings often went over me. (ta be cantinued .. .) Published by the SWEDENBORG SCHOOL OF RELIGION 48 Sargent St., Newton, MA 02158, U.S.A.
  37. 37. PubliJhed intermillent/j1 by the Swedenborg School 01ReligionVol. 1 June 1974 umber 2 The Journal ofDreams [Part II} • -EmllnueJ Swedenborg Th second of four instaUments of this intimate diary ept by wed nborg during the crucial y ars 1743-44. This version was translat into En­ glish by James John Garth ilkinson in 1860 but has never h retofore been published. Swedenborg Father-Dream on pril7 1744 - bert H. Kincn
  38. 38. SWEDENBORGS FATHER JESPER SVEDBERG (1653-1735) According to William Whites 1867 biography of Swedenborg, theabove picture of the bishop of Skara is a copy of a rare engraving oncein the possession of Dr. J. J. Garth Wilkinson. The two printed versesone in Swedish, one in German, are by unknown writers. The Swedishstanza states: "Here stands Herr Svedbergs image in copperplate, whoselearning, wisdom and zeal for Christs flock are widely and favorablyknown in Sweden ... " The German text says: "Here stands a picture-no metal can show the treasure which holds in it pure fear of God andintelligence. If it were to please many to emu/ate him, 0 how yourZion would rise, Sweden l " Some unknown hand has alsa superscribed the Latin verse Sweden­ borg wrote to commemorate the fact that the original copperplate en­graving survived the /ire which destroyed the bishop s house in Brunsbo in 1712. A free translation fo//ows: "This (copperplatej lay unhurt in the ashes of my fathers house ... So shan your name and fame survive the funeral pyre, father!"
  39. 39. 3 In this second issue we continue the text of Swedenborgs 1743-44 Journal of Dreams. The rest of the issue is devoted to articles by two faculty members of the Swedenborg School of Religion. One of these articles bears directly on the text of this installment of the Journal. Dr. Kirvens analysis of Swedenborgs dream-meeting with his father (who died in 1735) on the night of April 6-7,1744, caUs attention to a number of significant psychological changes which took place in Swedenborg about that time, and which have not always been clearly understood. Kirven, incidentally, cites the dream and related texts in the 1918 EngIish version of C. Th. Odhner rather than that of Wilkinson, since the latter text was not available to him at the time he wrote the article. Thus the reader may notice sûme variations in wording from the text of the Journal ofDreams which we are publishing in this magazine. Dr. Doles concise article on a particular problem in translating Swedenborgs Latin wiJ! be of special interest to linguistically in­ clined readers. [The night of April 6-7, 1744, contd.] [57] Afterwards about daybreak 1 fell again into a sleep, and then it was chiefly in my thoughts how Christ unites himself to mankind. Roly thoughts came; but they were such that they are q uite unsearchable. 1 can­ not in the least convey to the pen what passed; for 1 only know that 1 was in such thoughts. [58] Afterwards 1 saw my father, in a different cos­ tume from that he used to wear, nearly of a red color; he called me to him, and took me by the arms, where 1 had half sleeves with cuffs or ruffles in front. Re pulled both the ruffles forwards, and tied them with my strings. My having ruffles signifies that 1 am not of the p~tly,. order, but am, and ought to be, a civil servant. After­ wards he asked me how 1 like the question, that a king has given leave to about 30 persons who were in holy orders to marry, and thus change their estate. 1 an­ swered that 1 had thought and written something about
  40. 40. 4such a matter, but it has no relation thereto. [59] In­stantly thereupon 1 found rit in me] to answer, accord­ing to my conscience, that no one whatsoever should bepermitted to alter the estate to which he has devotedhimself. He said that he was of the same opinion. But 1said , if the king has resolved, the thing is settled. Hesaid he should deliver in his vote in writing. If there are50 [votes] the matter will be settled accordingly. 1 ob­served it as a remarkable fact that 1 never caHed him myfather, but my brother; thought afterwards how thiswas: it seemed to me that my father was dead, and this,that is my father, must thus be my brother. [60] To forget nothing, it came also into the thoughts,that the Holy Spirit would show me to Jesus, and pre­sent me to him, as a work that he had so prepared; andthat 1 ought by no means to attribute anything to my­self; but that aIl is his; although he of grace, imputes tous the same. So 1 sang the hymn 1 then selected: Jesus ar min wan then baste, n. 245 [Jesus is my best of friends.] [61 ] 1 have now learned this in spiritual [things], that there is nothing for it but to humble oneself and todesire nothing else, and this with aH humility, than thegrace of Christ. 1 attempted of my own to get love, butthis is arrogant; for when one has Gods grace, one leavesoneself to Christs good pleasure, and does according tohis good pleasure. One is happiest when one is in God sgrace. 1 was obliged with humblest prayers to beg forforgiveness before my conscience could be pacified; for1 was still in temptation until this was done. The HolySpirit taught me this; but l, with my foolish understand­ing, left ou t humility, which is the foundation of aIl.
  41. 41. 5 The night between [ApriJ] 7th and 8th. [62] Throughout the whole night 1 was going downdeep, stairs after stairs, and through various places, butquite safely and securely, as if there were no danger inthe depth; and th en there came to me in the dream thisverse: that neither the deep, nor anything else anymore . . . [63] Afterwards it seemed 1 was with a number ofothers dining with a priest. 1 paid about a louis dor formy dinner; more in fact than 1 ought. But as 1 was onthe way therefrom, 1 had with me two silver cups 1 hadtaken away from the table. This pained me, and 1 en-deavored to send them back, and it seemed that 1 hadthe means of doing so. This means, 1 believe, that l, inthe temptation, had paid my part (it was Gods grace)and even more than 1 ought (Gods grace); b~t 1thereby 1 learned much about spiritual things; which ismeant by the silver cups which 1 wished to send back tothe priest; that is to say, to the glory of God 1 wouldagain give to the church universal in some manner; as itseems to me indeed may be the case. [64] Afterwards 1 went in a considerable companyto a second priest, where it seemed 1 had been before.When we alighted, it seemed there were so many of usthat we should incommode the priest. Thought nothingof our being so many, and of the priest being troubled.This signified that 1 had many unruly thoughts where 1ought not to have them; thoughts that 1 could nevercontro!. The people also that 1 had before seen resem-bled Poles, hussars, that are maraud ers. But it seemedthat they went away. [65] 1 was also in this temptation, that thoughts in-vaded me which 1 should never be able to control; yea,
  42. 42. 6 so hard that 1 was withheld from aIl other thought; only to give them free rein for once, to go against the power of the spirit, which leads in another direction; so hard, that if Gods grace had ·not been the stronger, 1 should surely have fallen therein, or gone mad. Meantime 1 could by no means get my thoughts to contemplate the Christ that 1 had seen for that short moment. The move­ ment and the power of the spirit came to me, and 1 felt that 1 would rather go mad. Hereby was signified my re­ lation to the second priest. [66] 1 can compare it to two scales of a balance, i!!. the one of which is our own will and vehement nature; in the other, Gods power, which our Lord so places in temptation that he some­ times lets it come to an equilibrium, but so soon as ever it will weigh down one side, he helps it up. So 1 have found it, to speak after a natural manner. From this it follows that our power that presses down that scale is little, and that it rather opposes than assists the power of the spirit; and thus it is only our Lords work, which he disposes. [67] Then 1 found that various matters in my thoughts were brought forward that had been put into them long before; and so 1 found by this example the truth of Gods Word, that there is not the smallest word or thought that God does not know; and if we do not obtain Gods grace, we are answerable therefore. [68] This have 1 learned, that the one only thing in this state (I know not of any other) is, with humility to thank God for his grace, and to pray for it; and for us to regard our own unworthiness and God s infinite grace. [69] 1t was wonderful tha t 1 could have two thou_~ts, quite separate, at one and the same time; one for myself, who was occupied entirely by other thoughts, and with­ al the thoughts of the temptation, in such wise that
  43. 43. 7nothing was available to drive it away; it held me so cap­tive that 1 did not know whither to fly, for 1 bore it withme. [70] Moreover after this again, when particular mat­t~rs 1 ha<i long before thought and rooted in my mindcame up before me, it was as if it was said to me that 1should find reasons to excuse myself; which also was agreat temptation; or to attribute to myself the good 1had done, or more properly, that had happened throughme. But Gods spirit prevented this also and inspired meto find it otherwise. [71 J This temptation was stronger than the former,inasmuch as it went to the innerrnost, and on the otherside 1 had stronger proof of the spirit; for 1 sometimesburst out into a s~at. That which was suggested wasnot at aIl as if it would condemn me more, for 1 had thestrong assurance that this was forgiven me; but it wasthat 1 should excuse myself, and make myself free. 1~urst freq,l!ently into tears, not from sorrow, but frominward rejoicing that our Lord had chosen to show sounworthy a sinner such great grace; for 1 found from itaIl tha t this was the sum; tha t the only thing is to cast ---.oneselfwith humility into our Lords grace, to find onesown unworthiness, and thank God in humility for hisgrace; for if any glorification is in it, which makes forones own honor, be it glorification of Gods grace orwhatever else, it is to this extent im.e,ure. [72] When, as was often the case, 1 was in mythoughts about these very subjects, and a~e ac­counted me as a holy man and on this account offeredme dignity-as indeed it happens among certain simplepeople that they no! only venerate but even adore ~esl;!:.Qposedly-holy _ ­ as a saint-I then found that in the - -- ... manearnestness which then possessed me, 1 desired to do
  44. 44. 8him ail the ill 1 could to the highest degree, in order thatnothing at ail of the sin should stick to him, and thatwith earnest prayers 1 ought to appease our Lord, in or­der that 1 might never have any part of so damning asin to stick to me. [73] For Christ, in whom ail theGodhead is perfect, ought alone JO btlra ed to; for hetakes the greatest sinners to grace and regards as nothingour unworthiness; how can we therefore address our­selves in prayer to other than to him? He is almightyand the only mediator, which he does for others sake;the holy are made such; it is his work, and not ours, thatwe should . . . [The three last words are crossed out.Editor] [74 J 1 found myself more unworthy than others andthe greatest of sinners, as our Lord has permitted me togo deeper into certain things with my thoughts thanmany other people; and the very fountain of sin liesthere, in the thoughts, which are carried out in action;which in this way causes my sins to have come from adeeper ground than many other peoples. Thereln 1found my own unworthiness, and my sins greater thanother men s. For it is not en0u..gh to make oneself out tO) lbe unworthy, which may consist of something fromwhich the heart is far away, and may be a counterfeit;but to find out the fact that one is unworthy belongs tothe grace of the spiri t. [75] Now while 1 was in the spirit, 1 thought andsought how 1 might by my thoughts attain the knowl­edge of how to avoid ail that was impure; still 1 marked,notwithstanding, that the impure, on ail occasions, put -­itself forward. 1 found that it was dwelt uQon in thoughtfrom the point of view of self love. For instance, if anyperson did not regard me aëëë);ding to the estimate ofmy own imagination, 1 discovered that 1 always thought
  45. 45. 9 to myself, "Ah! if you only knew what grace 1 have, 1 you would act otherwise." This was at once impure, and 1had self love for its basis. At last 1 found this out, and prayed to God for his forgiveness. And then 1 asked that others might enjoy the same grace; which perhaps they had, or do receive. Thus 1 could here clearly ~~­ serve in myself one more of the horrible apples still re- maining, entirely unconverted, which are the root of Adam, and original sin. Nay, and endless other roots of sin belong to me besides. [76] 1 heard a persan sitting at table propose to his neighbor the question wh ether anybody could be melan- choly who had a superabundance of money. 1 laughed in my own mind, and 1 felt inclined to answer, if it had been right to do so in that company or if the question had been put to me, that a person who has ail means in e2<cess is not only subject to m~ancholy but to melan~[ choly i~a higher place, in the state of the mind and the soul, or the spirit which opera tes therein. Wondered that he raised such a question. [77] 1 can the better testify of this, as by Gods grace 1 have received as my portion a superabundance of ail 1 want in worldly means, can . live in plenty on my annual income, and carry out the - plans 1 have in my mind; and put by something after ail. 1 can thus bear my testimony that the misery and the melancholy which arise from lack of lifes necessities are low in degree and bodily in pressure, but are by no means so bad as the other kind. But as the power of the Spirit is in the one, the other knows nothing of this, for it may seem as if the former were strong so far as the body is concerned; but into this 1 do not enter. [ The last sentence from "But as" is crossed out with a thick stroke, made immediately after it was written.) [78] Saw a booksellers shop. Thought immediately
  46. 46. 10 that my works would do more than other peoples. But then it struck me at once that one is servant to another,1 and our Lord has among his means a thousand issues for preparing one man; and thus every book ought to be left to its own value, as a means near or remote according to the state of each mans reason. Still, pride, arrogance will push forth; may God control it, who has the power in his hands. [79] Had so much of the Lords grace that when 1 would determine to keep my thoughts in purity 1 found 1 had an inward joy, but still a torment in the body, which could not at ail bear the heavenly joy of the soul: for 1 left myself most humbly in Gods grace, to do with me according to his pleasure. God grant me humility, that 1 may see my own weakness, uncleanness, and un- ) worthiness. [On the 29th page only 20 lines are written, and these are entirely covered with strokes of ink. The following paragraph has been made out with considerable trouble, but portions of it can only be regarded as approxima­ tions in the way of guesses.] [80] During ail this time 1 was in society as usual and no one could in the least [observe in me any change] ; this was of Gods grace; but 1 knew what the case was, not darjng to say that so high grace had been vouchsafed me; for 1 found that it would conduce to no end, but for people to think about me in one way or another, for or against, each person in his own way. 1 found that it could do no good were 1 to men tion in private society, for the alleged glorification of Gods grace, that which might redound to my amour propre. [81] 1 found no better comparison for myself than when a peasant is raised to power as a chief or king and can command ail that his heart desired; but who yet had something in him that caused him to wish to learn that
  47. 47. 11of which he himself knew nothing. And from the com­parison one discovers that it is . . . thy gracious handthat causes the great joy. Yet was 1 sorrowing to thinkthat man can by no means place himself within thatgrace. [April] 8-9 [82] It seemed that 1 had on my knee a dog, and 1wondered that it could speak and ask about its formermaster, Swabe; it was blackish, and it kissed me. Waken­ed, and cried out for Christs mercy on the great pride 1cherish and the self-flattering it indu ces. Afterwards 1 thought that it was my fast day,which had been the day before, and that many thingshad been packed up for the army. [83] Afterwards a young woman in dark clothescame in, and told me that 1 ought to go to . . .Then there came at my back one that heId me so fast,the whole back with the hand and a11, that 1 could notmove. 1 besought one that was beside me for help, andhe helped her away; but 1 had no power to move thearm myself. This was the temptation of the previousday and signifies that 1 am by no means capable of do­ing any good thing of myself. Afterwards a whistlingwas heard as he went away, and 1 shuddered. (84] Afterwards 1 saw in St. Peters Church a personthat went into the chamber underneath where Peter lies,and he was carried out, and it was said that somebodyis stilliurking there. It seemed that 1 was free to go in and out, God leadme. [85] Afterwards 1 saw a11 that was unclean, and rec­ ognized myself as unclean, unclean with fil th, from he ad to foot. Cried "Mercy of Jesus Christ."
  48. 48. 12 [A phrase in the Swedish Common Prayer Book,the beginning of the Confession.] So the thought [of the words] "1, poor sin fuiman," was brought before me; which 1 also read the fol­lowing day. [April] 9-10. [86] The whole day, the ninth, 1 was in prayer, insongs of praise, in reading Gods Word, and fasting; ex­cept in the morning, when 1 was somewhat employed inother matters, until this same temptation came, that 1was as it were compelled to think that which 1 wouldnot. [87] This night as 1 was sleeping quite tranquilly, be­tween 3:00 and 4:00 oclock in the morning, 1 wakenedand lay awake but as in a vision; 1 could look up and beawake, wh en 1 chose, and so 1 was not otherwise thanwaking; yet in the spirit there was an inward and sensi­ble gladness shed over the whole body; seemed as if itwere shown in a consummate manner how it ail issuedand ended. It flew up, in a manner, and hid itself in aninfinitude, as a center. There was love itself. And itseems as though it extended around therefrom, and thendown again; thus, by an incomprehensible circle, fromthe center, which was love, around, and so thither again. [88] This love, in a mortal body, whereof 1 then wasfull, was like the joy that a chaste man has at the verytime when he is in actual love and in the very act withhis mate; such extreme pleasantness was suffused overthe whole of my body, and this for a long time, lastingail the interval of waking, especially just before 1 wentoff to sleep, and after sleep, half an hour or an hour.Now while 1 was in the spirit, and still awake for 1 could
  49. 49. 13open my eyes, and be awake, and then again enter thestate, 1 saw and observed that the inward and actual joycame from this source, and that in so far as any onecould be therein, so much cheer has he; and so soon asany one cornes into another love that does not concen­trate itself thither, so soon he is out of the way; [89]for instance when he came into any love for himself-toany that did not center there-then he was outside ofthe way. There came a little chill over me and a sort ofslight shiver as if it tortured me. From this 1 found fromwhat my troubles had sometimes arisen, and then 1found whence the great anguish cornes when the spiritafflicts a man; and that it, at last, ends in everlasting tor­ment and has hell for its portion, when a man unworth­ily partakes of Christ in the Holy Supper; for it is theSpirit that torments the man for his unworthiness. [90]ln the same condition in which 1 was, 1 came yet deeperinto the spirit, and although 1 was awake, 1 could by nomeans govern myself, but there came a kind of over­mastering tendency to throw myself upon my face, toclasp my hands, and to pray as before; to pray for myunworthiness, and with the deepest humility and rever­ence to pray for grace; that 1, as the greatest of sinners,might have the forgiveness of sins. Then also 1 observedthat 1 was in the same state as the night before last; butcould tell nothing further, because 1 was awake. [91] At this 1 wondered; and so it was shown me inthe spirit that man in this state is as a man with his feetupwards and his head downwards. And it came before me why Moses had to put off his shoes when he was togo to the holy place, and why Christ washed the apostles feet, and answered Peter that when the feet arewashed ail is done. Afterwards in the spirit 1 found that that which goes out from the very center, which is love,
  50. 50. 14is the Holy Spirit, which is represented by water; for it iscalled water or wave. [92] ln fine, when a man is in the condition of hav­ing no love that centers in himself but that centers onlyin the general or public good, which represents here onearth in the moral world the love in the spiritual world,and this not at ail for his own sake or societys sake butfor Christs sake, in whom love is and center is, then isman in the right state. Christ is ultimate end, the otherends are mediate ends; they lead direct to the ultimateend. [93] Afterwards 1 fell into sleep, and saw one of my acquaintances at a table; he saluted me, but 1 did not ob­serve it at once or return his salutation; he was angry and gave me sorne hard words. 1 tried to excuse myself,and at last 1 said that 1 was liable to be buried in thought and not to observe it when any one saluted me, so that sometimes 1 passed my friends in the street without see­ ing them. 1 appealed in confirmation of this to another acquaintance who was present, and he said it was so; and 1 said that no one wished to be (God grant this may be so) more poli te and humble than 1. This dream hap­ pened on account of the former night when 1 was in other thoughts than 1 ought to have entertained, and it showed that our Lord in his infinite mercy is willing to excuse me. But my friend made no reply thereto; how­ ever he seemed to be convinced, as 1 believed. [April] 10-1 1 [94] Came into a low room where there were manypeople; saw however only one woman, was in black, butnot evil; she walked a long way into a bedroom, but 1would not go with her. She waved to me at the door.
  51. 51. 15 Afterwards 1went out and found myself detained several times by aspecter which held me ail down the back. At last it disappeared, [95] and 1 came out. Came a foui specter which did the same thing: it was a foui old man. At last 1 got away from them. It was my thoughts that 1 had had the day before when 1 regarded myself as a1l too unworthy and thought that in my lifetime 1 should never surmount this state; but yet consoled myself with the thought that God is mighty in ail things, and that his power does it; ye~ still there was something in me that caused me not to submit myself as 1 ought to Gods grace, to do with me according to his good pleasure. [96] When 1 came out, 1 saw a great many peoplesitting in a gaIJery, and lo! a mighty stream of watercame down through the roof; it was so mighty that itbroke through aH that it met. There were some thatbarred the opening or hole. Some also tha t went asideso that the water should not hit them. Some that dissi­pated it into drops. Some that diverted its course so thatit turned away from the stand. This, 1 suppose, was thepower of the Holy Spirit that flowed into the body andthe though ts, and which in part 1 impeded; in part 1went out of its way; in part, 1 slanted it from me. Forthe people 1 saw represent my thoughts and will. [97] Afterwards 1 came out of this and was enabledin my thoughts in a certain way to measure and divideinto parts that which went from center to circumference.It seemed to be heaven; for there was afterwards a heav­enly brightness. 1 can indeed have my thoughts aboutthis; but as yet 1 dare not be too confident; because itconcerns something that is to happen. [98] While 1 was in the first struggle of this trial, 1cried to Jesus for help, and it went away. 1 also held myhands together under my head, and in this manner it didnot return the second time. Yet when 1 awoke, 1 had
  52. 52. 16 shiverings and 1 heard time after time a heavy muffled sound, but did not know whence it came. [99] Afterwards, when 1 was awake, 1 wondered ta myself whether this might not be phantasm. Then 1 ob­ served that my faith faltered; but 1 prayed with clasped hands that 1 might be strengthened in the faith, and this immediately took place. My own worthiness in com­ parison with others also came into my head; prayed as before; and the thought of it disappeared at once. Sa that if our Lord takes his hand from one in the very least, one is out of the right way, and the true faith, as it was with me, according ta this very palpable showing. [100] J slept about eleven hours this night, and ailthe morning was in my usual state of inward joy; yetthere was a pang with it. This 1 supposed ta arise fromthe power of the spirit and my own unworthiness. Atlast by Gods assistance J attained ta the thought thatman ought ta be satisfied with ail that the Lord pleases,for it is his; and that man does not at ail resist the spiritwhen he ob tains from Gad the assurance that it is Godsgrace as it works for our good; for as we are his, sa wemust be content with what it pleases him ta do with thatwhich is his. For this however man ought ta pray ta ourLord, for it does not in the very least come within ourown power. [101] He then gave me his grace ta this end: 1 passeda little inwards with my thoughts, and wanted ta un­derstand wherefore it happened sa; which was a sin.The thoughts had no right there; but 1 ought ta pray ourLord for ability ta govern them. It is enough that he sapleases. But in everything one ought ta cali upon, tapray ta, and ta thank him; and with humility ta ac­knowledge our own unworthiness. [102] Still 1 am weak in body and in thought, for 1
  53. 53. 17know of nothing but my own unworthiness and that 1am a miserable creature, which torments me. And bythis 1 see how unworthy 1 am of the grace that has beengranted me. [103] Observed also that the stream, as it feU down,pierced through the clothes of a person who was sittingthere as he was stepping out of the way. Perhaps a drophas fallen upon me, and presses hard; what would it beif the whole stream came. For 1 adopted the motto: Gods will be done: 1 am thine and not mine [struck out]. God gives grace thereto; this is by no means mine. [104] 1 discovered that a man may be in spiritualagony although he is assured by the spirit that he hasobtained the forgiveness of sins; and has the hope andthe assurance of being in Gods grace. This may [thetwo last words are crossed ou t] . [April] 11-12 [lOS] 1 was dreaming the whole night, though onlythe smaUest fraction of it cornes to mind. lt was as if 1was being taught all night in many things of which 1have no rE{collection. 1 was asleep abou t eleven hours.So far as 1 can recall it, 1 think (1) it was the said sub­stantials or essentials which a man ought to study andinvestigate. (2) lt was told me also of the thymus andrenal gland [of which he was then writing in RegnumAnimale] that as the thymus separates the impure serumfrom the blood, and the renal gland carries it back intothe blood after it has been purified, so it also happens inus, as 1 believe, spiritually. [106] (3) lt seems that 1 saw my sister Caisa, whodid something somewhat amiss and afterwards lay down
  54. 54. 18and cried out. When our mother came she assumed atotally different mien and a different speech, the signi­fication of which shall be given hereafter. [107] (4)There WâS a priest who preached to a great congregation,and at the end spoke against another person, butwhether he was named or not 1 do not know. But thenone stepped up and talked against him and said that itought not to be so. 1 was with them afterwards in a pri­vate company, and then, on inquiry, it was said that thepunishment for such a matter is disgrace, with a fine ofthree marks Swedish. He seemed to be not at ail awarethat it was thus punishable. It was said that one beginswith what costs one mark, then two marks, etc.; whichsignifies that a man ough t not to preach against anyone,or to speak, or to write; for it is punishable and slander­ous in the eye of the law. For it touches ones honorand good name. [108] (5) Afterwards my knees weremoved of themselves, which may signify that 1 had beensomewhat humiliated, as also is the case; which is Godsgrace, for which 1 am most humbly thankful. [109] Afterwards 1 found in myself, and perhaps wasdirected to it by the third point in the dream, that inevery one of our thoughts, yea in that thought that webelieve almost pure, there adheres an endless amount ofsin and impurity; as also in every desire that comes fromthe body into the thoughts, which spring originally fromvery great roots. Although thought should appear to bepure, yet underneath it is the fact that the man thinksfrom fear, from hypocrisy, and many other passions; asindeed one may somewhat discover by reflection; sothat we can all the less make ourselves free from sin, inthat there is no thought that is not mingled with muchuncleanness or impurity. Therefore it is best every hourand moment to confess oneself guilty of hell punish­ment; but to believe that the grace and mercy of God,
  55. 55. 19which is in Jesus Christ, overlooks it. [110] Yes, 1 haveoften observed that the whole of our will that we havegot, that is ruled of the body, and that introducesthoughts, is opposed to the spirit which does this.Therefore there is a continuai fight, and we cannot inany way unite ourselves to the spirit; but the spirit, ofgrace, unites with us. On this account we are as it weredead to aIl that is good; but we can incline ourselves tothe bad. For a man ought always to count himself guiltyof numerous sins; for the Lord God knows aIl (and we,very little) of our sins that only come into our thoughts;[we know] only of those that come into our actions,when we become persuaded of their sinfulness. It is also to be noticed [crossed ou t]. [April] 12-13. [111] 1 observed through the spirit that 1 was in thesame mental state that 1 had been the day before; whichwas also represented to me by a kind of spiritual light­writing; that the will influences the understanding mostin inspiration [breathing in]. The thoughts then fly outof the body inward, and in expiration are as it weredriven out, or carried straight forth; showing that thevery thoughts have their alternate play like the respira­tion of the lungs; because inspiration belongs to the will,expiration to nature. Thus the thoughts have their playin every act of respiration; therefore when evil thoughtsentered, the only thing to do was to draw to oneself thebreath; so the evil thoughts vanished. [112] Hence onemay also see the reason that during strong thought thelungs are held in equilibrium, still more in a condition ofnature; and at this time the inspirations go quicker thanthe expirations; at other times the reverse is the case.
  56. 56. 20Also, of the fact that in ecstasy or trance the man holdshis breath; at this time the thoughts are, in a manner ofspeaking, away. Likewise in sleep, when both inspira­tion and expiration belong to nature; when that is repre­sented which flows in from a higher source. The samemay also be deduced from the cerebrum; because ininspiration ail the organs intimate with the cerebrum it­self are expanded; and the thoughts then obtain theirorigin and their course. [113] Afterwards 1 came to a place where wondrous­ly large and high windmills were turning with dreadfulrapidity. Then 1 came into a darkness, and 1 crept uponthe ground and was afraid that one of the sails of the windmills would lay hold of me and kill me. 1 actuallygot beneath a sail, which then stopped, and 1 was weil off with it; for the sail helped me. This signifies that theday before 1 was in combat with my thoughts (which are meant by the sails of the windmi11s) and meantime 1had no idea what 1 should do; but with Gods assistancemy thoughts were tempered and so 1 was brought awaysafe and sound. Wherefore, honor and praise to Godwho does not despise my weakness. [U4]: Afterwards 1 seemed to be in company withsorne who endeavored as it were to make gold; but theysaw that they must climb up; but this they could not do,and without it, it was impracticable to make gold. Thiswent on for a time; then at Jast 1 was with two persons who attempted in spite of ail to rise up; although ourLord was by no means with them. 1 said: It cannot possibly be done; and so 1 went up before them. 1 had a rope, and pulled. Observed that underneath there wassomething that pulled strongly the other way. At last 1saw it was a fellow, whom 1 had the better of, and liftedhim up; and so 1 congratulated myself, and said that it
  57. 57. 21 was as 1 had said. [ 115] Signification 1 believe is this: the gold signifies what is good and pleasing to God; one must climb up to get it; and this is by no means within the compass of our own power, however much we ima­ gine that by our own powers we are able to do it; but then we find that there is that which pulls forcibly the other way; however at last we conquer through Godsgrace. [116] Afterwards 1was for a considerable time in thesame thought, which became ruddy in its light, whichruddiness signifie~ that therein is God s grace, and thatupon this depends the issue of our really doing (withGods grace and in faith, which may God give) thatwhich is good. This is making gold; for in this case mangets from our Lord all that is wanted, all that is useful tohim. Thus was represented very powerfully that thatwhich is good ought to be effected, and that the goldlies therein. [117] Afterwards when 1 had risen up 1 was in agreat fear before our Lord as in a chill; the least intima­ tion or thought that frightened me made me shiver;which was Gods grace to show me that 1 must seek sal­vation with fear and trembling. And as it is my motto,"Thy will be done; 1 am thine, and not mine"; and as 1have given myself from myself to our Lord; so let himdo with me according to his good pleasure. And in thebody also there was a certain dissatisfaction; but in thespirit, gladness thereat; for it is our Lords grace thatdoes it. God strengthen me therein. [118] Was con tinually in a figh t with double thoughtsthat battled against each other. 1 pray thee, 0 AlmightyGod, that 1 may obtain the grace to be thine and notmine. Forgive me if 1 have said that 1 am thine and notmine; this is not my province; it is Gods. 1 pray for the
  58. 58. 22grace to be able to be thine, and that in nought l be leftto myself. [April] 13-14. [119] Thought how the grace of the Spirit the wholenight worked with me. Saw my sister Hedvig, withwhom l would have nothing to do; which signifies that lought on no account to busy myself with the Oecono­mia Regni Animalis but to leave it. * Afterwards itseemed to me when time hung heavy, she first said toher children: Go out and read; afterwards, that wemight play drafts, or cards, and they sat down to these to pass away the time. It seemed then l was at dinner.l believe it signifies that there is nothing wrong or crimi­nal when one does this in the right way. [120] Lay with one that was by no means pretty,but still l liked her. She was made like others; l touchedher there, but found that at the entrance it was set withteeth. It seemed that it was Archenholtz in the guise ofa woman. What it means l do not know; either that l amto have no commerce with women; or that in politics liesthat which bites; or something else. [121] The whole day l was in double thought thattried to destroy the spiritual as it were with scoffing, sothat l found the temptation very strong. Through thegrace of the Spirit 1 was brought to fasten my thoughtson a tree, then upon Christs cross and on Christ cru ci­fied. As often as 1 did this, the other thoughts as ofthemselves feH flat. [122] l pressed with the samethought so forcibly that 1 seemed with the cross to pressdown the tempter and drive him away. Then l was for atime free, and afterwards l had to hold my thoughts so*It is uncertain what this means. The Oeconomia was completed and pub­lished in 1740-41. Odhner suggests it may refer to the. l11ethod followed inthat work. He may, of course, have intended to write Regnum Animale.
  59. 59. 23fixed on this that whenever 1 lost this out of mythoughts and inward sight 1 fell into tempting thoughts.God be praised, who gave me the weapon. God of hisgrace main tain me therein, that 1 always may have mycrucified savior before my eyes; for 1 dared by no meanslook upon my Jesus, him that 1 have seen; for 1 am anunworthy sinner; but rather 1 ought to fall upon myface; and Jesus it is that takes me up to look upon him;for thus 1 am enablèd to look upon Christ crucified. [April] 14-15. [123] It seemed that 1 ran fast down sorne steps, butonly slightly touched each step as 1 passed, coming for­tunately aIl the way down without peril. A voice camefrom my dear father: "You are creating alarm, Eman­uel." He said it was wicked, but that he would overlookit. It meant that yesterday 1 had made too bold a use ofChrists cross; yet it was Gods grace that 1 came free ofdanger. [124] So 1 climbed up on a shelf, and struck theneck off a bottle, from which there flowed a thick stuffand covered the floor. Then it flowed downwards, 1 be­lieve. Means that with Gods grace and no power ofmine a mass of evil was rooted out yesterday from mythoughts. Sat upon something that was written on,meaning what 1 still have to do. [125] Heard a bear growl but did not see him. Didnot dare to stay in the upper story, for there was a deadbody there that he would smell. 1 therefore went downto the apartment of Doctor Moraeus, * and closed theshutters. This betokens temptation, both on the score*Cf. S.D. 4717. Moraeus was Swedenborgs cousin.
  60. 60. 24of covetousness and perhaps of other things; also that 1am pursuing my anatomical speculations. [126] It seemed to me that Doctor Moraeus paidcourt to a pretty girl, obtained her consent, and thushad the means of taking her where he chose. 1 jokedwith her about the readiness with which she said "Yes,"etc., etc. She was a pretty girl, and grew bigger andprettier. It meant that 1 should inform myself about themuscles and reflect upon them. [127] 1 had a preternaturally good and long sleepfor twelve hours. When 1 wakened 1 had Jesus crucifiedand his cross before my eyes. The spirit came with itsheavenly life, as it were ecstatic, intense; and in a man­ner allowed me to go higher and higher in that state sothat had 1 gone on higher, 1 should have been dissolvedaway by this same actuallife of joy. [128] It came thus before me in the spirit that 1 hadgone too far; that 1 in my thoughts had embraced Christon the cross. Then 1 kissed his feet and afterwards re­moved myself away; then falling upon my knees 1prayed to him crucified. It seemed that as often as 1 didthis, the sins of my weakness were forgiven. It came tome that 1 could have the same thing before the eyes ofmy body in an image; but this 1 found was far fromright, and was great sin. (t() be continued ... }

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