fIlI=lHPCJ..Cf.)    Z        0~       t@        0        HBPip       0B~        E-!p::JZ.::r:
A NEWCHURCHMANS GUIDE Ta                   LONDON                  Compiled by         the Rev. Dennis DucltworthRefs.LJ/C...
A NEtVCHURCHIviAN r S GUIDE TO LONDON              INTRODUCTION    This little Guide is offered to you withthe vnsh that y...
London was about the size of the stamp!       In the Continuation concerning theLastJudgment,Swedcnborg vlrites of "the no...
Buses 19, 38, and 38A pass the door.Buses 68, 77, 77A, 188, 196, and others, passvery near. Most buses running along Oxfor...
"shop" .... ~ rather elegant kind of shop, butnevertheless one in which the Societyspublications may be bought. Do not mis...
forward here! VJhat propositions discussed, andresolutions passed:    On IlO a.c~ollllt f;hould the visitor omit thebaseme...
SWEDENBORGS LONDON    Emanuel Swedenborg (whose name a t this time ­before the ennoblement of the fe~ily - wasSvedberg) fi...
Literature had dawned, and genius was abroad.     Queen Anne was on the throne, to be followedby the first three Georges~ ...
S~edenborgts first visit to London. But he wasto return again and again in later years, and torecord his activities more p...
the first public meetjng of receivers of theHeavenly Doctrjnes (RP.14). Five people attended,~vho immediately adjourned to...
head; while in the Crypt may be     seen the tombsof great Englishmen - including     Wrens, with itsfamous inscription: "...
No, 6 Poultry is shown as being on the right,just beyond Bucklersbury, and almost oppositeOld Jmvry.     A few steps will ...
lease expired, and later occupied by theSwedenborgians and German Lutherans, t ill i tsdemolition in 1820. Hindmarsh menti...
the Kingt s Arros Tavern; and it is probablethat he stayed here at other times too. Thetavern has long since disappeared, ...
of London.                ROUTE NO. 2     This .vill be a shorter route, but onepacked with intercst for the New Churchvis...
wi th these "giants" in the busy neighbourhoodof "Grub Street" - as Fleet Street was nick­named.       Salisbury Court, of...
Protestant sect, originally from Bohemia.They are distinguished by their puritanicalsimplicity of lif~ and manners, and ~a...
interest and rural quiet. "Who enters hereleaves noise behind." It is a collection ofcourts, lanes, squares, gardens, and ...
Essex Street, just to the west of theTemple, is of interest, because at No. 31,the home of George Prichard (two-thirds oft...
not one of the most attractive of Londanshighways. Look out for Cross Street, orrath~r Saint Cross Street, as it is knownt...
Continue along Farringdon Street (herenamed Farringdon Raad) ta its junction withClerkenwell Raad, turn right, and immedia...
and the numbering of the houses was altered.Ro~voods map of 1799 does not show a No. 26ut all. However, the Swedenborg Soc...
Goldsack. of Australia - father of theReverend S.J.O. Goldsack. The New ChurchCollege today, in Sydney Road, WoodfordGreen...
The Cambanvell Society of the New Chur ch.Address - Flodden Road, Camberwell New Road,                        S.E.5.Neares...
The Finchley society came into being in1954, as a result of the emalgamation of theArgyle Square and Carnden Road societie...
Islington, and the handsome panelled reredoscame frOID the liner, the Mauritania.Michael Church Society of the General Chu...
society in 1884, vdth bœ. (afterwards theReverend) R.W. Freeman as leader. The schoolbuilding is dated 1889, and the churc...
Dennis duckworth-swedenborg's-london-a-newchurchman's-guide
Dennis duckworth-swedenborg's-london-a-newchurchman's-guide
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Dennis duckworth-swedenborg's-london-a-newchurchman's-guide

  1. 1. fIlI=lHPCJ..Cf.) Z 0~ t@ 0 HBPip 0B~ E-!p::JZ.::r:
  2. 2. A NEWCHURCHMANS GUIDE Ta LONDON Compiled by the Rev. Dennis DucltworthRefs.LJ/C - Swedenborgts Last Judgment (Continuation)NCH - The New Church HeraldNCL - New Church LifeRF - Hindmarsh s Rise and Progress of the Nt.."Y Church
  3. 3. A NEtVCHURCHIviAN r S GUIDE TO LONDON INTRODUCTION This little Guide is offered to you withthe vnsh that you ~ill greatly enjoy your visitto London. For London, as well as being awonderful city two thousand years old, is alsorich in its associations for the New~hurchmrol.Swedenborg came to London up,{ards of eleventimes: here the Arcana was published: hereSwedenborg died: here lived Robert Hindmarsh,who called together the first receivers of theHeavenly Doctrines: here was born the organisedNew Church: here was the first distinctive NewChurch worship, in the little chapel off GreatEast Cheap. Modern London, too, is a centre of the NewChur ch. The Swedenborg Society has itsheadquarters at 20/21 Bloomsbury Way, W.C.1.Swedenborg House is the home and office of theChurch in many ways. There are six activesocieties of the Church in the greater Londonarea, as well as the New Church College atWoodford Green, Essex - just aeross the LondonCounty border. London is big - very big: thirty milesacross. It has grm-m rapidly during the past~vo centuries. It is many times bigger thanthe London Swedenborg lmew. In 1750 Londonstretched from Marble Arch to just beyond theTower, in a west-to-east direction; and from(Swedenborg House) to "The Elephant and Castle,in a north-to-south dll~ection. AlI beyond wasopen country. If we compare moùern London, insize, to a large envelope, then Swedenborgs ( 1)
  4. 4. London was about the size of the stamp! In the Continuation concerning theLastJudgment,Swedcnborg vlrites of "the noble Englishnation." He loved England for its spirit offreedom, and the consequent "interiorintellectual light" of its people. He was notblind to the insularity of the British, as whenhe notes their readiness "to contract intimacywith friends of their mm nation, and rarelywi. th others." "Englishmen, fi he says, "arelovers of their country, and zealous for itsglory, but regard foreigners much as a personlooking through a telescope from the roof ofa house regards those outside the city." Buthe adds, "they are kind in relieving eachothers necessities, and are lovers of sincerity."It was because of the freedom of the Englishpress that Swedenborg could publish his worksin London without interference - a privilegedenied to him in his mm country. It is hopedthat those who visit London today will not beove!liihelmed by the prevailing insularity of theinhabitants, but will find still, in thehistoric streets of this great city, a love offreedom, a little intellectual light, sincerity,and a general spirit of friendliness and help ­fulness. D.D. Finchley, 1956. SWEDENBORG HOUSEAddress - 20/21 Bloomsbury Way, London, W.C.1.Five-minute Ylalk from Holborn UndergroundStation (Central Line): ten-minute walk tromTottenham Court Road Underground Station(Central and Northern Lines). ( 2)
  5. 5. Buses 19, 38, and 38A pass the door.Buses 68, 77, 77A, 188, 196, and others, passvery near. Most buses running along OxfordStreet and New Oxford Street will be convenient. It will be well to start our tour of Londonat Swedenborg House. The fine premises of theSwedenborg Society are situated in the heart ofLondon. Just off the great artery of New OxfordStreet, and fringL~g one of the famous oldsquares of Bloomsbury, they stand in a districtnoted for its intellectual and artistic life.Nearby is the British Museum. Many largepublishing houses are near neighbours. This isthe bookmans London: it is also the travellersLondon, for Bloomsbury abounds with hotels andboarding-houses, large and small. Many a visitor,strolling along Bloomsbury V/ay, has paused beforea certain shop window, and caught his first sightof the name SVlEDENBORG. Yes, Svvedenborg House issplendidly situnted. The Swedenborg Society was founded in 1810.For over forty years i t had no permanent promises.rts stock of books llas stored, and its meetingswere held in private houses or public taverns.In 185~ the Society took on the occupancy ofNo. 36 Bloomsbury Street (now No. 1 BloomsburyStreet). Bloomsbury Street is a turning off~Je"w Oxford Street - the third on the right beyondthe junction with Bloomsbury Way; and here theSociety dwelt for sevcnty-one years. In 1925,through the dètermination and generosity of anL~ber of people - and especially of I~. DavidWynter, the present large and handsome premisesviere purchased. Every New Church visitor to London shouldmake a point of callL~g at, and inspecting,Swedenborg House. On the ground floor is the (3)
  6. 6. "shop" .... ~ rather elegant kind of shop, butnevertheless one in which the Societyspublications may be bought. Do not miss theshmv-case in the corner, with its interestirigexhibits. Behind the shop is the Hall - belovedof aIl New Church Londoners. Classical in style,and perfectly proportioned, the Hall.will holdabout a hundred-and-fifty people. The portraitson the wall.include SWedenborg hinself; theReverend Samuel Noble, first secretary of theSociety; Dr,J.J.Garth W~lkinson, translator ofmany of Swedenborgs scientific works, andpioneer of British homoeopathy; Robert Hindmarsh,founder of the New Church organisation; CharlesHigham, the. New Church his torian; and theReverend J.F.Potts, famed for his great~ordance. In the Marchant Room, on the first floor,the student will find dcsk, with pen, ink, andpaper, and books of reference aIl around. Nextdoor is the office - the inner sanctum of thesecretaries, treasurer, and office staff. The Societys library is housed in theWynter Room, on the second flaor. This is acarefully kept and fully catalogued collectionof Swodenborgs works in aIl editions. Here,too, m~ be seen Swedenborgs ring, the table heused in his London lodgings, the Mouravieftsilver-botmd Greek Testament, the Mooki copy of"The Truc Christian Religion," and other relies.But the Wynter Room is the committee room of theSociety, and - generally speaking - thecommittee room of the Church. The ConferenceCouncil, the New Church College Council, the NewChurch Missionary Society, the British Acaderny,the 1956 General Assembly Committee, and manyother meetings of the Conference and the GeneralChur~~, sit round its table. ïhat plans are put (4)
  7. 7. forward here! VJhat propositions discussed, andresolutions passed: On IlO a.c~ollllt f;hould the visitor omit thebasement. In the Gardiner RClom, surronJlù.ed bythe shelves of the Conference Library, sits themanager of the New Church Press, ready to sellor give the booklets and pamphlets published bythat body. In another room in the basement, theSociety keeps its l.rchives, manuscripttranslations, historical material"Swedenborgiana" , annotated volumes of theWritings and much correspondence of early NewChurch people in this and other Europeancountries. lmd finally - before climbing thestairs again - the visitor should peep into thestock rooms. Here are New Church catacombs ­rooms illld cellars and corridors, filled fromfloor té ceiling with stock - with new andsecond-hand volumes, bOW1d and unbound copies,plates, sheds, packing, string, and sealingwax: aIl thnt one yrould expect to find "downbelow" in an up-to-date and thorough-goingpublishing house. In -1910 the Swedenborg Society celebratedits centenary;-vith a great congress of NewChurch people from many parts of the world(See the"Transactions of the InternationalSYvedenborg Congress, Il published by the Society).The Coneress Vas houscd in the Kings Hall,Bolborn Restaurant, Kingmvay - immediatelyopposite the Bolborn Underground Station. Thebuilding was éJ.amaged in the Second Y!orld V,iar,and - at the time of compiling this Guide - isbeing demolished or extensively remodelled.But the visitor should note the site of anoutstanding event of the pasto (5)
  8. 8. SWEDENBORGS LONDON Emanuel Swedenborg (whose name a t this time ­before the ennoblement of the fe~ily - wasSvedberg) first visited London as a young manof tr{enty-t~7o, a graduate of Uppsala University,getting to lcnow the world. This was in 1710.He came with the scant approval of his father,Bishop Jesper Svedberg. His first letter home,dated London...z." Octobcr 13th, 1710,is apologeticin tone, and reveals a certain home-sickness. The voyage from Gëteborg to London wasadventurous. The ship was boarded by the crewof a Danish privateer, Vas fired upon by anEnglish guard-ship by mistake, and was becalmedon a aand-bank in a dense fog. The vesselanchored in the Thames, just off Wapping OldStairs. Thi~ is reached today by walking eastfrom the Tower of London, and turning downGravel Lanc. It is a district where, not manyyears ago, men carried knuckle-dusters in theirpookets, and policemen walked about in hvos andthrees. It is perfectly respectable today.Near Wapping Old Stairs, in Swedenborgs time,stood an inn, to which pirates were brought,made insensible with gin, and hung. Swsdenborgnarrowly missed being hung - not for piracy,but for ignoring the quarantine regulations ­a serious offence. The plague had broken out inSvreden, and aIl on board ship were commanded tostay there for six weeks. Swedenborgs youthfulimpatience got the better of him: he left theship, was caught, and severely reprimandedprobably only escaping the gallm7s because hewas the son of a distinguished bishop. The London of this time was a fair andflourishing city. The Augustan Age of llrt and (6)
  9. 9. Literature had dawned, and genius was abroad. Queen Anne was on the throne, to be followedby the first three Georges~ London was newly­built after the Great Fire, and Swedenborgspeaks of "the magnificent St. Pauls Cathedral,finished a few days ago." In Westminster Abbeyhe kissed the tomb of Casaubon (at the cornerof the nave and south transept). Isaac deCasaubon, a Swiss theologian, translator, andqritic, had been dead nearly a hundredyears.He v;as a great Latinist; and Swedenborg, freshfrom college, seems to have had a venerationfor him. It is not kno..-m where, or . .v i th whom,Swedenborg stayed on his first visit to London.He moved from place to place, staying withthose from . ."hom he could learn a craft. "1 putmy lodgings to some use," he . .v rites to Benzelius,his brother-in-law. He wàs certainly not thefirst, or the last, Scandinavian to do this."1 study Newton daily," he writes again. He madethe acquaintance of Flamsteed, the AstronomerRoyal, Halley, and other members of the RoyalSociety - possibly at the headquarters of thatSociety in Crane Court, off Fleet Street.Swedenborg had, to use his O"ffi V/ords, "animmoderate desire" for knowledge; and he boughtbooks, both for himself and for libraries inSweden, in Paternoster R~7. He was therefore"short of cash," and cqmplains to Benzeliusthat his father is not sufficiently mindful ofthe needs of a young student. He visited SionCollege Library in London Wall (now on VictoriaEmb~~kme~~), which whetted his appetite to seethe Bodleian at Oxford. These feu facts can be given, but littleelse can be said ...-vith certainty about (7)
  10. 10. S~edenborgts first visit to London. But he wasto return again and again in later years, and torecord his activities more precisely. TOURS THROUGH LONDON to seek out places associated with Swedenborg and with the New Church. These are planned, that you may wander alongfrom place to place without fatigue, this littleGuide Book in your hand. Take the bus to Ludga. teCircus, and you are at the heart of Sledenborg sLondon. Travel west along Fleet Street, northtowards ClerkenV/ell, or east to St.Pauls andthe City, and you tread the ground thatSwedenborg once trod. You are, mareover, in thecradle of the infant N~v Church organisation.Take ID. th you a modern street map, yet realisingthat such a map cannot be a true guide to theLondon Sv~edenborg kne...: for the topography of agreat city is cantinually changing. You irillneed to leap about - mentally, of course - fromdate to date, for it will be impossible tofollaw a time-sequence as you go exloring. TheLondon pavements are hard: take the simplestraight- fO~7ard way, and let the dates takecare of themselves. ROUTE NO.1 Starting from Ludga,te Circus, walk upLudgate Hill tOiJards St. Paul s. The Church ofSt. Mar t in-wi thin-Ludgate is on the left. Thismarks the position of the city gate, built ­according to popular traditian - in 66BC byKing Lud, who is said to have built the citysfirst walls. Adjoining the church is "Ye OldeLondon" pudlic housc. This was The London CoffeeHouse, where, in 1783, Robert Hindrnarsh called (8)
  11. 11. the first public meetjng of receivers of theHeavenly Doctrjnes (RP.14). Five people attended,~vho immediately adjourned to The Queens ArmsTavern, St. Paul s Chur chyard, "and drank teatogether~" (It is said that a ceHar of "Ye OldeLondon" is the old condemned cell of NewgatePrison) • St. Paul s Churchyard is the area, jn­cluding the roadway and buildings, immediatelys urrounding the cathedral. The Queen s ArmsTavern no longer exists; but it stood on thesouth side of the Churchyard - i.e. the right ­hand side, facing the cathedral - at the cornerof Deans Court (site of the Westminster Bank).The Svredenborg Society possesses an illustrationof it. It was a tavern used for the famous clubmeetings of Dr. Johnson, David Garrick, andothers; and there is a record of Johnson and themeIribers of the Ivy Lane Club dining there onDecember 3rd, 1783 - just nvo days before theHindmarsh meeting (Gentlemans Magazine, Lib. XV.15). Describing this first New Church meeting,Hindmarsh says, "To hear the story of eachothers first reception of the doctrines, andto observe the animation tha t sparkled in theeye and brightened up the countenance of eachspeaker, as it came his turn to relate theparticulars of that by him never-to-be-for­gotten event, ",as itself a little heaven"(RP.16). Sir Christopher Wren s masterpiece, St.Pauls Cathedral, stands before you. Blackénednow by the smoke l~om a million chimneys, itwas, in Swedenborgs day, white and fresh. Aclimb to the Vfhispening Gallery, the StoneGallery, the Upper Gallery, and the BalI willbe rewarding for those with energy and a steady (9)
  12. 12. head; while in the Crypt may be seen the tombsof great Englishmen - including Wrens, with itsfamous inscription: "Lect or , si monumentwp.reguiris, circumspice" (Reader, if you seek hismonument, look around you). Leaving the cathedral, make your way to thenorth-east corner of St. Pauls Churchyard, toPaternoster R~{ - just behind Nicholsonsdrapers shop. Paternoster Raw is a ruin.Before the war it was a narrow thoroughfare,lined with bookshops - a real gem of old London.It had been a publishers and booksellers lairfor hundreds of years, and its printers signs,hung above the doors and windows, were lore forthe antiquarian. In the mid-eighteenth century,at NO.1, under the sign of "The Bible and Dove,"was the shop of John Lffi7is, publisher of thatgreatest of theological and expository works,Swedenborgs Arcana Caelestia. Swedenborg camemany times to this shop, during the years ofpublication (1749-1756). On Horwoods Map ofthe City of London, of 1799, No.1 PaternosterRow is shawn as being on the right-hand side, afew paces dmYn from Cheapside. Walk along a1eapside (site of the GreatMarket of London in medieval times), past thechurch of St. Mary-le-Baw (of Baw BelIs fame) ,and, unsuspectingly, you are in Poultry. At thehouse of Thomas Wright, Watchmaker to the K..-ing,No.6 Poultry, was held, on Tuesday, July 31st,1787, a meet:ing that may be regarded as "thecommencement of the New Church in its externaland visible form." The Sacrament of the HolySupper was administered to eleven persons, ill1dfive others were baptised into the faith of theNew Church (RP.58). The communion cup used onthis occasion is still in regular use in thechurch at North Finchley. On Honvoods Map, (10 )
  13. 13. No, 6 Poultry is shown as being on the right,just beyond Bucklersbury, and almost oppositeOld Jmvry. A few steps will bring you to the hub ofthe City of London - to the Mansion House, theoffici al residence of the Lord Mayor (on theright), the Royal Exchan~e (straight ahead),and the Bank of England (on the left), Speak­ing of the English in the Spiritual World(LJ/C.42), Swedenborg describes "tfO largecities like London, into which most of theEnglish enter after death. l was permittedto see them, and also to walk through them.The middle of the first city answers to tha tpart of London, England, where the merchantsmeet, called the Exchange." Just beyond the Mansion House, turn rightinto King William Street, ....hich runs south tothe Monument and London Bridge. This streetvv<as built in the middle 1830s, and much oldproperty was demolished to make Vlay for it.At its junction with Cannon Street (thisportion of which ,/aS previously named GreatEast Cheap) stood Maidenhead Court, in whichwas the Great East Cheap Chapel - the firstever used far New Church ~orship. JamesGeorge "!hite, in his book, "The Churches andChapels of London," tells us that MaidenheadCourt ,ras removed about 1831 for the con ­;::·~rudioTl of tho nO".i thoroughfare. Of theChapel he says, "This was a large squarebuilding with three galleries, holdingabout seven hundred people. Underneath theChapel v..-ere shops, and the way to i t fromGrea t East Cheap was through a passage intothe Court. The origin of the Chapel isinvolved in much obscurity." The Chapel wasovmed by the Baptists till 1760, when the (11)
  14. 14. lease expired, and later occupied by theSwedenborgians and German Lutherans, t ill i tsdemolition in 1820. Hindmarsh mentions thatit was rented for .t:30 per annum, and that "atthe end of the passage, in the street that ledto the place of worship, was placed a paintedboard, on vfhich was inscribed, "The NewJerusalem Church;" and over the entrance of theChapel was the inscription, "Nmv i t isallowable," in conformity to the memorablerelation in the True Christian Religion, No.508" (RP.59,61). Maidenhead Court is shawnon the old maps of the City. The first NewChurch society occupied the Chapel for sixyears - from January 27th, 1788, to the endof the year 1793. The first five meetings ofConference were held here, and the first NewChurch ordinations were performed within its,-,ralls. Reader, tread lightly on this hallQli,redspot~ Continue now along Eastcheap and GreatTower Street to the Tower of London. (Youmust, on some other occasion than this, visitthe Tower and its environs). Keep to thenorth of the Tower, y.nd enter ;aoyaX M§tZ~~:et. c rossing the Minories (where Sweden­: once lodged) ana nem!rii Street. Continuein an easter ~rec ~on a ong Cable Street ­a narraw street, gloomy, and at first sight,forbidding. A very mixed population liveshere - Je~~sh, negro, Indian, Asiatic,and,oddly enough, Scandinavian - on the fringeof dock-land. This was Scandinavian Londonin Swedenborg s time; and names likeThollander, Carlson, and Svenne are still tobe seen. The second turning on the right (Fletcher Street) leads into Wellclose Sguare.Here Swedenborg once lodged for ten weeks,with his friend Eric Bergstrom, landlord of ( 12)
  15. 15. the Kingt s Arros Tavern; and it is probablethat he stayed here at other times too. Thetavern has long since disappeared, and thesquare has deteriorated - though a few housesstill retain a trace of their former elegance.The church in the centre was originally theDanish Church, where Magister Aaron Mathe9ius,a bitter opponent of Swedenborg, was actfngpastor. Return to Cable Street, and the thirdopening on the right leads into SwedenborgSquare, formerly Princes Square - in whichstood the old S1edish Church. Swedenborgworshipped here, his flD1eral was here, andhe was bUl: ied in a va u1 t beneath the altarat the east end of the church. In 1908 hisbody was removed to Sweden, where i t no".{ lieein Uppsala Cathedral. The church was dem­olished, and the ground on which it stoodmade into a garden. Swedenborg Square isabsolutely delightful, if you visit it - asl did - on a warm and smmy autumn day.The garden is neat, well-kept, and full offlowers. Wooden seats surround a small pond,and little children playon their swings andromdabouts. Perhaps you may chat with oneor two of the old people who live in thecottages of the square, and who weIl rememberthe old Swedish Church. "This used to be ahigh class neighbourhood," says one old man,"but now ••• ?" Yes, now Swedenborg Squareis a relie of former days - one of thosequaint spots of historie association, hiddenin the heart of London. Swedenborgs name iscommemorated here in the East End, with itsteeming populaoe fram aIl over the world. Return to Cable Street, turn left, andthen right, along Leman Street, to Aldgate East,where you will find buses running to moat parts ( 13)
  16. 16. of London. ROUTE NO. 2 This .vill be a shorter route, but onepacked with intercst for the New Churchvisitor. The starting place, again, i8Ludgate Circus. Under the railv:ay bridge, on the southwall, is an inscription: "In a house nearthis site was publishcd, in 1702, the DailyCourant, first London Daily Newspaper." Thus,~~s the baIl set rolling! Look west, alongFleet Street - the home of the great Britishnewspaper industry; for this is the way we go.The birth of the New Church was possible onlywhcre "freedom of the press" existed; and thiseJo.."Ï.sted in England in 1749, when the Arqanawas first published by John Le-1is, and printedby John Hart, of Poppin s Court, Fleet Stre et. Poppin s Court (now Poppin s AIley) isthe first on the right in Fleet Street, goingwest. It is likely that Mr. Harts home andprinting shop was dŒlm the alley to the left,on the site nm. occupied by Beaverbrook Nmvs­papers, Ltd. &7edenborg spent many eveningswith the Hart fmnily, when the Arcana wasbeing printed; and it i8 interesting to notethat, a t this time, in Gough Square nearby,Dr • John son, Il the grea t Lexicographer , I l wasbusy; Samuel Richardson, on the other sideof Fleet Street, was VITiting and publishinghis novels Clarissa and Pamela, with OliverGoldsmith as proof-reader; and not far awayîn the Inner Temple, Vlilliam Cowper andEdmund Burke were sucking their pens in theuncongcnial environment of a solicitorsoffice. Maybe Swedenborg rubbed shoulders ( 14)
  17. 17. wi th these "giants" in the busy neighbourhoodof "Grub Street" - as Fleet Street was nick­named. Salisbury Court, off Fleet Street (thesecond opening on the left) is associatedwith an earlier visit of Swedenborg. In 1744­he travelled to London from Holland with acertain John Sermiff, "a pious shoemaker, Il anda member of the Moravian Church. Senniffintroduced him to Paul John Brockmer, a gold­watch chaser, of Salisbury Court, with whomhe lodged for two months. This part of Londonis still the home of goldsmiths, silversmiths,and jevrellers. Swedenborg thus lived almostnext door to one of the most beautiful ofWren r s churches - St. Bride 1 s; and in theshadow of the notorious Bridewell Rouse ofDetention. Walk along Fleet Street, past the greatnev/spaper offices. Note "Ye aIde CheshireCheese" restaurant, the hatmt of Dr. Johnson.We know that S7edenborg was accustomed todine at an inn in Fleet Street: was it this?See also Johngon t s house in Gough Square - a_]1!1J: etïwttpe=:()f à bouse or SwëêLêfibmg:s:::::dâi.Crane Court (the last on the right beforeFetter Lane) is probab~ where Swedenborgmet Flamsteed, Halley, and other members ofthe Royal Society, at the Socie~ls head­ quarters. Turn the corner, and walk a little wayup Fetter Lane, ta see the site of the oldMoravian Chapel, where Swedenborg worshippedfor a short time while staYing with Brockmer.He was attracted by the Moravian simplicityof life, but was repelled, at length, by thetheological teaching. The Moravian Brethren(officially named. the Uni tas Fratrum) are a (15)
  18. 18. Protestant sect, originally from Bohemia.They are distinguished by their puritanicalsimplicity of lif~ and manners, and ~arnest,austere piety. They have no doctrine beyondthe Brotherhood of Man, and have always beengreat missionaries and educators. TheirChapel in Fetter Lane, until completelydestroyed by bombing in the last war, wasone of the small historie chapels of London.Built in the reign of James the First, i tescaped the Great Fire, and survived many areligious riota John Wesley resigned frommembership of the Fetter Lane Chapel fouryears before Swedenborgs attendance. TheChapel was entered at No. 32 Fetter Lane, andalso trom Nevill s Court - the third openingon the right: nŒ{ 0.11 destroyed. Return to Fleet Street, and walk on alittle way to Temple Bar. The old bar, orgateway, be~veen the City of London and theCity of Westminster, was removed in 1878;and that useless obstruction to traffic, the"dragon" or "griffin" memorial, Vias put upin its place. This i3 the spot, where, onstate occasions, the sovereign "knocks uponthe door Il on en tering the City fromWestminster, and the Lord Mayor surrendershis sword of state. In Swedenborgs day,the heads and limbs of persans executed fartreason were displayed on spikes above thecentre pediment of the Bar, and there was afine trade of letting spy-glasses at a half­penny a look~ To the right lie the Law Courts, and tothe left lies the Temple. The Temple, as weknew i t before the war wrought havoc there,had not alterea much in two hundred years.It is one of the most charming spots inLondon, combining as i t does antiquarian (16)
  19. 19. interest and rural quiet. "Who enters hereleaves noise behind." It is a collection ofcourts, lanes, squares, gardens, and passage­""rays, where barristers have their rooms andlegal men their chambers. The Temple is ofparticular interest to the New Churchmanbecause it was the first domicile of theinfant New Church. Hindmarsh, after des­cribing the Queen 1 s .Arms Tave:rn meeting, says(RF.17), "In the course of the following weekwe engaged chambers in the Inner Temple, nearFleet Street; and to make our next meetingmore public, wc caused an advertisement to beinserted in sorne of the newspapers, statingthe objeci:.swe had in view, and giving ageneral invitation to aIl the readers ofEmanuel SYvedenborg s Wri tings, in London orelsewhere, to join our standard." We donot know where these chambers were; butHindmarsh goes on to say that, after meetingtwo or three times in them, he and hisfriends took more convenient rooms in NewCourt, Middle Temple. New Court lies betweenMiddle Temple Lane and Essex Street, and"contains only one large house, which oocupiesthe entire west side (RP.23)." The meetingsin New Court were attended by many persons ofreputation and talent, including James Glen,of Demerara, who took the new doctrines toAmerica; F.H. Barthelemon, the RoyalMusician; John Flaxman, sculptor, Lieutenant­General Rainsford, Governor of Gibraltar;possibly William Blake and his father; andothers destined to play an important part inthe grovrth of the New Church organisation.The Temple takes i ts name from Solomon 1 sTemple in Jerusalem; and it is more than interesting that the New Church, which is theNew Jerusalem, should have had its firstfoundation here. (17)
  20. 20. Essex Street, just to the west of theTemple, is of interest, because at No. 31,the home of George Prichard (two-thirds ofthe way down, on the left), on 26th February,1810, was held the first meeting of theLondon Printing Society - now lmown as theSwedenborg Society. ROUTE No. 3 Again the s tart is a t Ludgate Circus;and before travelling north, we make a slightsojourn south - to Blackfriars, site of ananciemt Dominican monastery. Walk up LudgateHill, turn left down Creed Lane, and rightalong Carter Lane. The first narrow streeton the left is Friars Street, at the bottomof which, on the left, is Hutchinson House ­a publishers depèt. This is certainly thesite - and possibly the actual building - ofthe Friars Street New Church society, whichcommenced in 1792 under the leadership of theReverend Manoah Sibly, as an offshoot of theGreat East Cheap society. The society rentedpremises in Store Street, off Tottenham CourtRoad; then in Red Cross Street, Cripplegate;then in Cross Street, Hatton Garden; andfinally in Cateaton Street, near the Guildhall;before erecting the Temple in Friars Streetin 1802/3, on a sixtY years lease. UnderSibly the society in Friars Street prospered,and in time became the Argyle Square, King sCross, society - and now the North Finchleysociety. Hutchinson House has a vaguelyecclesiastical appearance. On Horwoods map(Fadens edition of 1813), the chapel isclearly shown on this spot. Return .to Ludgate Circns, and wall<: in anortherly direction along Farringdon Street ­ ( 18)
  21. 21. not one of the most attractive of Londanshighways. Look out for Cross Street, orrath~r Saint Cross Street, as it is knowntoday - àbout the seventh opening on theleft~ At No. 16 are the offices of Bairdand T~tlock (London), Lw., and their partners,Hopkin and Willi~~, Ltd. - chemists. An entryat No. 17 leads to the firms warehouse behindthe offices - and this is the fabric of the oldCross Street) Hatton Garden, church. Hindmarshsays (RF .169 , "The remnant of the societyformerly meeting in Great East Cheap, eversince their removal frOID tha t place of worshipentertained the design of erecting a moreconvenientbuilding. This offered i tself inthe year 1796, in Cross Street, Hatton Garden,when three individuals of the society, viz.,Mr. Ralph Hill, of Cheapside, Mr. RichardThompson, of Snow Hill, and mYself, entereiinto a negotiation with the proprietor topurchase the freehold astate, called HattonHouse." The purchase, the building of thechurch, and the opening ceremonies, are des­cribed in detail - followed by an account ofthe society s rather prccarioua early history.In time the society settled d~m, and continuedhere for nearly eighty years. The name everassociated with the Cross Street, Hatton Gardens,church is that of the Reverend Samuel Noble ­author of the famous "Appeal" on behalf of theNew Church, a...1d brilliant advoca te of theHeavenly Doctrines throughout his long ministry,It is said that William Blake composed his poem,"The Divine Image," in one of the pews of thechurch; and the baptismal rcgister cantains thename of Richard DOyly Carte, famed for hisproduotion of the immortal Gilbert and Sullivanoperas, In 1783/4 the society moved to CamdenRoad, Hollovmy - and has now merged into theNorth Finchley society, (19)
  22. 22. Continue along Farringdon Street (herenamed Farringdon Raad) ta its junction withClerkenwell Raad, turn right, and immediatelyleft, into Clerkenwell Green - a bit of realold London. Clerkenwell Close leads out ofthe Green - a narrow winding road through sornerather "dawn-at-heel" property. No. 32, thehome of Robert Hindmarsh, "Printer ta His RoyalHighness, the Prince of Wales," seems ta be theonly house demolished during the war. The smallbombed site is on a corner, immediately oppositethe premises of George Brown (City) J Ltd.,Notice end Sign-board Contractors. Horwoodsmap of 1799 shows this spot as No. 32, and thenumbering is unchanged today. Here, then,lived Hindrnarsh, and here he had his Sundaymorning meetings (when the Writings were readin La tin), before ever the New Church as anorganisation was thought of. Walk on, past Hindmarshs house, and takethe first turning left - Bovrling Green Lane;this will bring you again inta Farringdon Raad.Cross the road, and walk a few steps north, tafind Topham Street, formerly Great Bath Street.Ornnia mutantur - how the times, and the eus toms,and the situations change: This littlecollection of prefabs, surrounded by tall andugly tenement flats, was once a fine square ofdesirable suburban residences - Cold BathSquare, vdth its spring of medicinal waters.Swedenborg took lodgings at No. 26 Great BathStreet, the house of Richard Shearsmith, aperuke (or wig) maker; here he had a"paral y tic stroke," just before Christmas,1771; and here he died on Sunday, 29th March,1772. The house - and indeed, the whole stréet- was destroyed in the blitz, and there is~ome little doubt as ta just where No. 26 stood.The entire area was rebuilt in thelast century, (20)
  23. 23. and the numbering of the houses was altered.Ro~voods map of 1799 does not show a No. 26ut all. However, the Swedenborg Societypossesses photographs of the house thouW1tto be that (or on the site of that) in which~vedenborg lodged: see NCL. June 1929. 321:and NCR. November 1950. 189: for interestinginformation. Swedenborg also lodged at oneUme in fràrnêr Streefl(at a right-e.ngle withTopham Street, with lia Mr.s. Carr, next to e e lon. Il The site of the Red Lion isstill to be seen, and the house next door wasprobably on the spot nov. occupied by F.H.Norman & Co., Ltd., Wood Merchants. Thedistrict has much deteriorated, and is now anItalian neighbourhood. Topham Street isnamed after the famous "Strong Num of Islington"- an entertainer of c.1750, one of whoseattractions was to eat a live chicken, bonesand feathers and all! Perhaps, when the pre ­fabs. are removed and the street is rebuilt,the City Corporation may agree to perpetuatea name more honoured and of greater worth thanthat of Islingtons Strong Man. Come out into the busy thoroughfare ofRosebery Avenue, and take a bus (No. 19,38,38A,176) to "The Angel," Islington. Crossthe road J and walk along to Char Iton Place(on the right): this will lead you to thetop of Gerrard Street: down which, the firstopening on the left is Devonia Road. Thelarge Polish Catholic Church was, until 1931,the New Church College. Devonshire Street,Islington. A fund for the establishment of acollege was begun in 1845; seven years laterthe ground .vas purchased; and about 1857 thebuildings, including the fine ch"lpel, werecompleted. The first student for the ministryte be educated at the college was Redman (21 )
  24. 24. Goldsack. of Australia - father of theReverend S.J.O. Goldsack. The New ChurchCollege today, in Sydney Road, WoodfordGreen, Essex, has a much more rural setting(See NeE. Special College Edition. January24th, 1948) • TtŒ ChlJRœ :ru MODERN LONDON It is not the purpose of this littleGuide to attempt to describe the societiesof the New Church in London today, nor togive anything but the barest outline of theirhistories; but rather to give the visitor alittle useful and practical information toenable him to visit those societies i f he sowishes. There are six N~{ Church societiesin the Greater London area - here presentedin alphabetical order.The Anerley Society of the New Church.Address - Waldegrave Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.19.Nearest station - Crystal Palace (Law Level).Buses No.2 and 3 from central London, or anybut going to the Crystal Palace. WaIdegraveRoad is at the bottom of Anerley Hill, whichgoes dm;n steeply from the bus terminus.Divine worship on Sundays: 11a.m.and 6.3Op.m. The Anerley society is in the south ofLondon, in the vicini ty of Croydon. It cameL~to being as a result of lectures deliveredin the Aner ley Tovm Hall by the Reverend PeterRamage and others. The church wa.s built in1883, with 1~. R&~ge as first rrJnister ofthe society. ( 22)
  25. 25. The Cambanvell Society of the New Chur ch.Address - Flodden Road, Camberwell New Road, S.E.5.Nearest station - Kennington Oval: then walkalong Cambervrell Nmv Road to Flodden Road (onthe right).Buses No. 68,68A,196 from Swedenborg Rouse(Southampton Row), or any bus going to Camber­weIl Green: then walk along Cambenvell NewRoad to Flodden Road (on the left).Divine ~orship on Sundays 11a.rn. 1st and 3rdSundays at 6.3Op.rn. In 1862 a course of Sunday eveninglectures in Kennington Hall was arranged byMessrs. George Dm1n and Isaac Gunton. Theseled to the formation of a committee, andeventually of a society, in 1864. Two yearslater, the society was received into member­ship of the General Conference, and a plot ofland was leased. The church premises werededicated in 1867. For a number of years thesociety was under the leadership of 1~. E.Austin, and then under the ministry of theReverend W.C. Barlow.The Finchley Society of the New Church.Address - 71 Gainsborough Road, North Finchley, N .12.Nearest station - Woodside Park (Northern Line):then a ~vo-minute walk up Woodside Park Road.Buses - from Moorgate, 609: from High Holborn,517 and 617: from Willesden and Cricklewood,645 and 660: from Golders Green, 125 - toTally-Ho Corner, North Finchley: then walkalong the High Road to the fifth turning on theleft - Woodside Park Road. The church is atthe junction of VToodside Park and GainsboroughRoads.Divine worship on Sundays: 11a.m. and 6.3Op.m. (23)
  26. 26. The Finchley society came into being in1954, as a result of the emalgamation of theArgyle Square and Carnden Road societies.These two societies were the descendantsrespectively of the Friars Street and CrossStreet, Hatton Garden, societies: thus, theFinchley society is the great-grandchild ofthe first society ever established - that inGreat East Cheap. The church in Argyle Square,King s Cross, was bombed to the gI"ound in theearly days of the Var; and the lease of theCampden Road premises expired in 1952 - thougha part of them (in Parkhurst Road, Holloway,N.7.) is still in use for Sunday School andother activities. The society has strongtraditions, and possesses many records of theearly New Church. The Reverend DennisDuckworth was invited to be i ts first minis ter.The Kensington Society of the New Church.Address - 5 Pembridge Villas, Westbourne Grove,North Kensington, W.11.Nearest station - Notting Hill Gate (Metropol­ itan and Central Lines); then walk downPembridge Villas.Buses No. 27,27A,28 and 31 stop at the door.Buses No. 7,15,23 and others pass near.Divine worship on Sundays: 11a.m. and 6.30p.m. The Kensington society formerly existedin Palace Gardens Terrace, W.8., in a handsomechurch erected at the expense of Mr. JohnFinnie, and given to the Reverend Dr. JonathanBayley in 1872. The society was first formedof members from Argyle Square, resident inWest London: the first name on the membera troll is that of the Reverend William BrulSe(of Bruces Commentaries). The society movedto Pembridge Villas in 1925. The fine lignumferrum pe"ls are from the old College Chapel in (24)
  27. 27. Islington, and the handsome panelled reredoscame frOID the liner, the Mauritania.Michael Church Society of the General Church.Address - 131 Burton Road, Brixton, S.W.9.Nearest station - Kennington, and Kennington Oval.Buses No. 109 and 133 from Kennington station,or any bus going along Brixton Road~ Alightat "The iVhite Horse, 11 which is a few pacesbeyond the end of Burton Road.Divine worship on Sundays: 11a.m. Michael Church is a society of the r~neralChurch of the New Jerusalem, with headquartersa t Bryn Atbyn, Pa., U.S.A. It was founded in1891, as a society in connection with theAcademy of the New Church - an educationalestablishment. The premises were built in1892, at thG expense of V~. C.J. Vhittington,and were intended primarily for a school. TheReverend R.J. Tilson was the first pastor,from the foundation to 1938. The society wasofficially adopted by the General Church in1927/8.The Willcsden Society of the New Church.Address - 90 High Road, willesden Green, N.W.10 •opposite the Public Library.Nearest station - Willesden Junction.There are many ways to Willesden, but bus No. 8from Marble Arch to the Public Library isconvenient.Divine vfOrship on Sundays: 6.3Cp.m. In 1882, a few of the members of theKensington society met for worshipand studyin Willesden. This lcd to the founding of the (25)
  28. 28. society in 1884, vdth bœ. (afterwards theReverend) R.W. Freeman as leader. The schoolbuilding is dated 1889, and the church, 1910.The New Church College.Address - 13 Sydney Road, Yfoodford Green, Essex.Nearest station - Snaresbrook (Central Line):then No. 20 or 20A bus to Sydney Road, WoodfordGreen.Bus No. 38A trom Victoria (and from SwedenborgRouse) passes the end of Sydney Road. The College is about ten miles from thecentre of London, in the north-east, and onthe fringe of Epping Forest. It is a three-storied building, standing in a large garden,with very attractive aurroundings of commonland and foreat. The Principal of the Collegelives on the premises; the tutors visit theCollege for classes. The College exists totrain Students for the ministry of the GeneralConference of the N~v Church. Easter andSummer Schools for laymen (and women), and aMinisters School, are yearly occasions at theCollege. The visitor to London should notfail to see the College, and - if time permits- something of the great forest nearby. And here, we finish our little Guide toLondon. (26)

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