+0          VALUE    (in design: how we define it/how it defines us)                                                      ...
(or)CREATIVE PROCESS: HOW IT’S VALUED WITHIN ANDOUTSIDE OF DESIGNTHE VALUE OF CREATIVITY CULTURALLY: NOT JUST AS ACOMMODIT...
3/22It’s un-debatable that design offers much of value                                                 While on the one ha...
4/22Some Questions                                     How do we value creative activity, and what can we do to foster sup...
5/221. STEM into STEAM                                     John Maeda:                                     “Great science ...
6/222. Liz Sanders: Participation Design                                     “An unmet need that has emerged repeatedly in...
7/222. Liz Sanders: Participation DesignValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Semin...
8/223. Government Support: Arts funding cut in Netherlands                                     “State support of Dutch cul...
9/223. Government support: Arts funding cut in Netherlands                                     If art as it stands today c...
10/224. Design School: Blurring boundaries between art & design                                     “More than anything, t...
11/224. Design SchoolJen Bracy,http://www.jen-driven-bydesign.com/?p=456Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines ...
12/225. Challenging notions of “Art,” connecting Art & Design, expanded modelsof communication.                           ...
13/225a. Beuys                                     “... connection between object-based work and an ‘expanded conception o...
14/225a. BeuysBeuys,I Like America andAmerica Likes meValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Phar...
15/225a. BeuysBeuys,Action Piece(Performance)Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad ...
16/225b. Sol Lewitt                                     “In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspec...
17/225b. Sol LewittSol Lewitt,Wall Drawing 793B1Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Gr...
18/225b. Sol LewittSol Lewitt,Wall DrawingInstructions andCertificateValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us)...
19/225c. Anni Albers, from “Work with Material”                                     “Life today is very bewildering. We ha...
20/225c. Anni AlbersAnni Albers,Second Movement II,1978, detail.Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Fr...
21/225d. Questions About Artists                                     Can we apply Beuys’ philosopy to communication today?...
22/22Bibliograpy and Resources                                     Amsterdam Budget Cuts                                  ...
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Design Presentation, Grad Seminar F'11

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Value (in design:how we define it/how it defines us)

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Design Presentation, Grad Seminar F'11

  1. 1. +0 VALUE (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) ∞ -
  2. 2. (or)CREATIVE PROCESS: HOW IT’S VALUED WITHIN ANDOUTSIDE OF DESIGNTHE VALUE OF CREATIVITY CULTURALLY: NOT JUST AS ACOMMODITY; AS AN ACTIVITY AS A MEANS OF ENGAGING THE WORLD AS A VALID FORM OF COMMUNICATIONHOW CREATIVE ACTIVITY IS VALIDATED, ACCEPTED ANDENGAGED WITH, AND THE BLURRING BOUNDARIESBETWEEN FIELDSCULTIVATING CREATIVITY, AND GROWING RECOGNITIONOF NEED FOR IT.
  3. 3. 3/22It’s un-debatable that design offers much of value While on the one hand, we seem to be recognizing,to others today; “design thinking” has been suddenly, that creativity is a valuable asset inchampioned as the new magic ingredient in buisness employees across fields, and that people have “unmetschools; design is oft-equated with innovation, and needs” to be creative, on the other, what meagerof course the power of design to influence consumer support we’ve had in place for the arts–in schoolsand viewer behavior hasn’t fallen from favor either. and at large–is being cut away at even more; we have a very poor system, it seems, for nurturing theBut “value” itself is less-easily defined. We can kind of creativity that’s in apparent demand. Thiscertainly pinpoint specific contributions design conflict of needs is confusing, and perhaps leads to ahas made to the evolving sphere of culture and larger question of how we define our values now. Ascommunication, and to ways it’s assisted endeavors designers, we are in the luxurious position of makingin other fields. However, in quantifying design’s creative activity valuable in the world. It seems, inbright potential, I believe there are valuable aspects order to give creative process its due, however, weof design process–more broadly, creative activity need not just more funding and support, but a moreitself–that too easily slip through the cracks, benefits holistic framework alongside quantitative measures,that perhaps don’t register on the radar of certain or an entirely new model for understanding “value”broader value systems. altogether.Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  4. 4. 4/22Some Questions How do we value creative activity, and what can we do to foster support for creativity - as designers? - as educators, and/or with educational policies? - culturally: through our institutions and/or government support? And what other structures are set up to “nurture” the arts/creative activity? How fluid with boundaries between art and design are we? How do dif- ferent disciplines inform each other? Can art (as an approach: exploration, latteral thinking, intuitive ideation, etc.) provide extra steps in innovation and/or “problem-solving” that we need if we are basically re-defining what “graphic design” does? How do we foster recognition of creative value, and encourage par- ticipation in creative activity: generally, as designers, as educators and culturally?Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  5. 5. 5/221. STEM into STEAM John Maeda: “Great science happens because of great creativity.” “Be the artist inside the scientist.” “We believe that creativity is a right.... art and design create... innova- tors.” http://vimeo.com/26901487 http://vimeo.com/30624307 (1:30)Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  6. 6. 6/222. Liz Sanders: Participation Design “An unmet need that has emerged repeatedly in the past three years... is the need for everyday people to be more creative. We see this need expressed both at home and at work.” (2:17) “People need... above all the freedom to make things among which they can live, to give shape to them according to their own tastes, and put them to use in caring for and about others.” - Ivan Illich, in Tools For Creativity (3:24) http://www.knowledgepresentation.org/BuildingTheFuture/Summaries/Sanders_summary/SandersQuick- time/SandersMovie.htmlValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  7. 7. 7/222. Liz Sanders: Participation DesignValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  8. 8. 8/223. Government Support: Arts funding cut in Netherlands “State support of Dutch culture within and outside of the Netherlands has generously and actively contributed to the vital development of global artistic practice, presentation, and discourse. Given the Nether- lands’ role as an exemplar of cultural cultivation, we believe that this se- ries of events signals a dramatic turn and sets an unfortunate precedent in the international cultural landscape.” “... the government itself... keeps on repeating that art should take care of itself and better start looking at the market instead of the state for any kind of financial support.” “The solution posed—to cut-off certain institutions (especially non-exhib- iting ones where the measure of cultural value is not in property but in processes that build culture) and to close academies is unacceptable...” http://fillip.ca/content/responses-to-recent-dutch-arts-cutsValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  9. 9. 9/223. Government support: Arts funding cut in Netherlands If art as it stands today can’t take care of itself without external support, is it a viable practice? What is the relationship of artistic activity to commerce? Is arts practice an inherently elitest activity? Or at least, a luxury of more wealthy economies? How might art/creative practice be useful in defining the future? What do we gain from it?Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  10. 10. 10/224. Design School: Blurring boundaries between art & design “More than anything, these distinctions are devices of disciplinary convenience. ...Graph- ic design stopped looking like graphic design, as we once knew it, several years ago... I have met many people in graphic design who might just as easily have studied art, photography, digital media, or film and whose interests span all these activities—as mine do—without drawing strong distinctions among them.” “...everyone’s workload is broader now, and design’s vanguard has moved to a more open and less definable location—a place that looks more like what we see going on at the Sandberg Institute.” “Yes, it does sound close to art, since artists engage in similar activities, and the design M.F.A. explicitly sets out to develop individuals with a strong personal position and voice. As design evolves, there is a need throughout higher education to rethink some no longer black-and-white aspects of the art/design relationship.” - Rick Poynor, A Report from the Place Formerly Known as Graphic Design, Print MagazineValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  11. 11. 11/224. Design SchoolJen Bracy,http://www.jen-driven-bydesign.com/?p=456Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  12. 12. 12/225. Challenging notions of “Art,” connecting Art & Design, expanded modelsof communication. Joseph Beuys - Performance Art, “expanded notion of art” Sol Lewitt - Challenging the authority and ownership of the artist Bauhaus Philosophy / Anni Albers - the connection between art and designValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  13. 13. 13/225a. Beuys “... connection between object-based work and an ‘expanded conception of art” An expanded definition of material that included “will, speech and thought.” Saw social sculpture & education as one of his greatest artworks. “The whole process of living is my creative act.” Joseph Beuys repeatedly said... it was his role to provide “the means to point out that the human being is a creative being.” ... for Beuys, “Art is not there to provide knowl- edge in direct ways. It produces deepened perceptions of experience. . . . Art is not there to be simply understood, or we would have no need of art.” http://www.walkerart.org/archive/5/9D43B5DB685147C46167.htmValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  14. 14. 14/225a. BeuysBeuys,I Like America andAmerica Likes meValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  15. 15. 15/225a. BeuysBeuys,Action Piece(Performance)Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  16. 16. 16/225b. Sol Lewitt “In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work. When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes the art.” http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v8n1/gallery/smith_e/lewitt_541.shtmlValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  17. 17. 17/225b. Sol LewittSol Lewitt,Wall Drawing 793B1Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  18. 18. 18/225b. Sol LewittSol Lewitt,Wall DrawingInstructions andCertificateValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  19. 19. 19/225c. Anni Albers, from “Work with Material” “Life today is very bewildering. We have no picture of it which is all- inclusive, such as former times may have had. We have to make a choice between concepts of great diversity. And as a common ground is wanting, we are baffled by them... ... We have useful things and beautiful things -- equipment and works of art. In earlier civilizations there was no clear separation of this sort... But most important to one’s growth is to see oneself leave the safe ground of accepted conversations and to find oneself alone and self- dependent. It is an adventure which can permeate one’s whole being. Self-confidence can grow. And a longing for excitement can be satis- fied without external means, within oneself; for creating is the most intense excitement one can come to know.” -- Anni Albers, “Work with Material,” from “Black Mountain College Bulletin, no. 5, November 1938Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  20. 20. 20/225c. Anni AlbersAnni Albers,Second Movement II,1978, detail.Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  21. 21. 21/225d. Questions About Artists Can we apply Beuys’ philosopy to communication today? Is this method of communicat- ing “indirectly” something that needs to be valued/recognized today in a larger cultural sphere? Can investigation of authorship and process, as exemplified in Lewitt’s work, be valuable to expanding the role of the designer and common models of communication? How is this sort of activity cultivated and valued in design schools, in design practice, and/or cultur- ally (at large)? How relevant is Albers’ philosophy to now? Do we still recognize/concur that there’s an inherent connection between process across arts disciplines? How might we shift our per- ception and view these separations in a more holistic way?Value (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011
  22. 22. 22/22Bibliograpy and Resources Amsterdam Budget Cuts William Morris, Art Wealth and Riches http://fillip.ca/content/responses-to-recent-dutch- http://www.chanceprojects.com/node/283 arts-cuts Can You Measure Design’s Value? Manifesta Art Mediation (Businessweek, 2007) http://manifesta.org/network/manifesta-art- http://buswk.co/ew38tm mediation/ Education: Documents of Contemporary Art What’s in a Name? Felicity Allen, Ed. http://www.jen-drivenbydesign.com/?p=456 Art School: Propositions for the 21st Century STEM into STEAM Steven Henry Madoff (Editor, Introduction) http://stemtosteam.org/ (more videos: http://vimeo.com/26901487, Liz Sanders http://vimeo.com/30624307) Creative culture http://www.maketools.com/ Sol Lewitt What is Creativity? http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v8n1/gallery/ http://bit.ly/uBELtY smith_e/lewitt_541.shtml A Social Vision for Value Co-Creation in Design, w/ George Simons Joseph Beuys http://www.walkerart.org/ The Relevance of Critical Theory to Art Today archive/5/9D43B5DB685147C46167.htm J.M. Bernstein, Lydia Goehr, Gregg Horowitz, and Chris Cutrone http://bit.ly/dIiXI1 Anni Albers http://www.albersfoundation.org/Home.phpValue (in design: how we define it/how it defines us) | Frances Pharr | Grad Seminar | Fall 2011

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