Wellbeing at Thomas Tallis

800 views

Published on

An introduction to Wellbeing at Thomas Tallis School, London, UK.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
800
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
213
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Wellbeing at Thomas Tallis

  1. 1. Wellbeing at Thomas TallisWhat is it? Where is it? And why do we care?
  2. 2. What is ‘Wellbeing’? • Multiple discourses ( Gill Ereaut DCSF Research Conference 2008), highly contested • Often constructive negatively, particularly concerned with protective aspects and vulnerable or deprived children • It can (and should) be developed in a more positive sense, building on strengths and personal qualities • A cultural construct – what people collectively agree makes ‘a good life’ • The stuff you already do! The stuff that this school is made of • A duty of schools from September 2007
  3. 3. Isn’t Wellbeing just about my health? • NO! – Personal, Physical, Emotional, Mental, Social, Cultural, Political, Economic, Academic, Community, Spiritual, Moral…. • What are we here for? • A focus on ‘Wellbeing’ calls for nothing less than a transformation in fundamental institutional structures…. • It’s what we’re trying to do at Tallis - Making a difference to the lives of children – Helping them to become informed, active and responsible members of local, national and global communities, and to make positive decisions
  4. 4. Why ‘Wellbeing’? • Tallis is a ‘first-mover’ • Faculty of Wellbeing to formalise some aspects of the curriculum • Who wants it? – DCSF, ABA, Health Organisations, Parents, Citizenship Foundation, Employers, Schools, Students… • Inspected by Ofsted from September 2009 – developing wellbeing indicators to assess a school’s contribution to promoting pupil wellbeing and to provide schools with local area information • The Educational Imperative - we don’t need the whip of assessment to make it matter
  5. 5. Current Initiatives • Aims of the Curriculum – Successful learners, Confident individuals, Responsible citizens • Every Child Matters – Be Healthy, Stay Safe, Enjoy and Achieve, Achieve Economic Wellbeing, Make a Positive Contribution • Whole curriculum dimensions – Identity and diversity, healthy lifestyles, community participation, enterprise, global dimension, technology and the media, creativity and critical thinking • Personal Learning and Thinking Skills • Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) • Values Education
  6. 6. Wellbeing across the school • The curriculum is the entire planned learning experience • ‘Enterprise Days’ • Do you have a burning desire to do something different with a year group but have no time in your already overcrowded curriculum? • We can give you time!
  7. 7. What do you think?Questionnaire Results • 54 teachers, of which 52 are currently or have been tutors • Main findings; – Results fairly similar across year groups – Most teachers like spending time with their tutor groups – Most teachers think that tutor time is important – Most think that PSHE should be taught by specialist teachers – Most teachers feel comfortable with a majority of PSHE/Citizenship/Work Related topics but not adequately trained and without time to devote to teaching the tutor group – Distinction apparent between ‘tutor time’ and ‘PSHE lessons’
  8. 8. I enjoy teaching my tutor group I enjoy teaching my tutor group 18 16 14 12 1 10 2 3 4 8 5 6 6 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  9. 9. I enjoy spending time with my tutor group I enjoy spending time with my tutor group 25 20 15 1 2 3 4 5 10 6 5 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  10. 10. Key Quotes • Feel unqualified to teach certain subjects/Lack expertise [10] • Students see it as an extension of registration/don’t see it as a proper lesson [4] • Enjoy spending time with them [7] • Resources not useful/too difficult/not there/”dry” [5] • To get to know my tutor group/develop positive relationships [15] • Pair and group work difficult to manage [4]
  11. 11. I receive lesson plans in time for the lesson I receive lesson plans in time for the lesson 20 18 16 14 12 1 2 3 10 4 5 8 6 6 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  12. 12. I receive lesson plans in time to feel prepared I receive the lessons plans in time to feel prepared 16 14 12 10 1 2 3 8 4 5 6 6 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  13. 13. I would like to receive lesson plans… I would like to receive lesson plans... in advance 18 16 14 12 no preference day before 10 Fri before 1 w eek+ 8 1/2 term term year 6 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  14. 14. I would like to receive resources… I would like to receive resources... in advance 16 14 12 10 no preference day before Fri before 8 1 w eek+ 1/2 term term 6 year 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  15. 15. Tutor time is important Tutor time is important 35 30 25 1 20 2 3 4 15 5 6 10 5 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  16. 16. Tutor time could be used in a more productive way Tutor time could be used in a more productive way 25 20 15 1 2 3 4 5 10 6 5 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  17. 17. Key Quotes • Too administrative, not pastoral enough • Too much to fit in [2] • Need training (ASDAN) [2] • 1-to-1 mentoring [2] • Ongoing projects – something that leads to a sense of achievement at the end • Not just single focus (WEX) • Smaller group work on a carousel • Discussion based activities
  18. 18. PSHE should be taught by specialist teachers PSHE should be taught by specialist teachers 16 14 12 10 1 2 3 8 4 5 6 6 4 2 0 Total 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 unstated
  19. 19. Key Quotes from final comments • Concern that the extent of ‘Wellbeing’ is becoming central to curriculum at the expense of content • Tutor has a different role to PSHE teacher • Only volunteers should deliver PSHE and individuals uncomfortable with it should not have to [2] • Extra workload [2] • Feel untrained/lack of expertise short changes the students [5] • Staff care about wellbeing • Tutor time is important but needs to be reviewed • No progression in PSHE with tutors
  20. 20. How can it be done? – Case-studies • Wolverhampton Grammar School – Timetable suspended for 25 hours over a three week period – Focus on independent learning projects – Students research a theme, produce a report with support materials and present to a group of ‘outsiders’ • Colyton Grammar School, Devon – Rated outstanding by Ofsted the last 3 consecutive years – One of the highest performing schools in the country – Leading Edge – Tutor led – All students complete personal challenges for the ASDAN Award
  21. 21. Northumberland Park Community School,Tottenham • Humanities team 8-11 • Tutor led in Year 7 • Whole school collapsed timetable days • Enrichment activities • Specialist days
  22. 22. DeCartaret College, Jamaica • House system • Student union • Prefect system • Humanities team teaches civics • Compulsory Clubs on Thursday mornings
  23. 23. Ottawa, Canada • Character Education • Tutor knowledge of students • Common vision • Student Empowerment • Community Links
  24. 24. What are we here for?Future Directions for Tallis • How should the timetable be structured? • What is the role of the Tutor at Tallis? – First port of call for tutees – Help and advice – ‘Brain Gym’ – Structured Play – Delivering a curriculum? – Peer Education? – Should it be structured time? Informal?
  25. 25. An operationalised discourse: wellbeing as outcomes and indicators Contemporary The (very) new discoursemedical discourse of sustainability Wellbeing Echoes of a The relatively recent philosophical discourse discourse of holism

×