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Comparative study on e government

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Comparative study on e government

  1. 1. TWINNING LIGHT BA06-IB-JH-03-TL IDDEA EU Cards Twinning Programme Š™ŠŒ’¢ ž’•’— ˜ ‘Ž ’›ŽŒ˜›ŠŽ ˜› ’’£Ž— Ž—’’ŒŠ’˜— ›˜ŽŒ’˜— ¢œŽ– ˜œ—’Š Š— Ž›£Ž˜Ÿ’—Š Œ’Ÿ’¢ ›Š—’œŠ’˜—Š• ›Š–Ž ˜›” ˜ ˜–™Š›Š’ŸŽ œž¢ Š— Œ˜––ž—’ŒŠ’˜— Š–™Š’— ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 1
  2. 2. Œ˜™Ž ˜ ‘Ž ˜Œž–Ž— Š‹•Ž ˜ Š‹‹›ŽŸ’Š’˜—œ Ž—Ž›Š• ˜ŸŽ›Ÿ’Ž  ˜— ‘Ž ŠŽ—Œ¢ ’—›˜žŒ’˜— œ›žŒž›Ž 4.1 CIPS centre of Sarajevo.......................................................................................................................14 4.2 CIPS centre of Banja Luka...................................................................................................................14 4.3 Cooperation mechanisms with other institutional bodies....................................................................15 4.4 CIPS information system......................................................................................................................15 4.5 CIPS information system......................................................................................................................15 Š ˜›Š—’£Š’˜— 5.1 Organisation and management............................................................................................................17 ŽŒž›’¢ Š››Š—Ž–Ž—œ ™˜•’Œ’Žœ 6.1 (Risks and mitigation measures)..........................................................................................................20 ˜–™Š›Š’ŸŽ ŠŠ ‹Ž ŽŽ— ˜œ—’Š Š— Ž›£Ž˜Ÿ’—Š œ˜—’Š Š— Š•¢ 7.1 National Progress Report on e-Government in the EU27+.................................................................27 7.2 EU Benchmark Survey of 2007............................................................................................................27 7.3 New e-Government user satisfaction and user impact project in the European Union.....................31 ‘Ž Ž¡™Ž›’Ž—ŒŽ ’— Š•¢ 8.1 Political Structure..................................................................................................................................32 8.2 Information Society Indicators..............................................................................................................32 8.3 State of e-government implementation in Italy....................................................................................33 8.3.1 E-democracy.....................................................................................................................................34 ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 2
  3. 3. 8.3.2 M-Government..................................................................................................................................34 8.4 The Ministry for Public Administration and Innovation........................................................................34 8.5 CNIPA Presentation..............................................................................................................................35 8.6 CNIPA Activities....................................................................................................................................36 8.7 The role of Regional Centres for e-Government and Information Society (CRC)..............................37 8.8 The main Italian e-government databases ..........................................................................................38 8.8.1 Connection to the databank of the Tax Register through Siatel.....................................................38 8.8.2 Connection to the databank of the territorial agency through SISTer............................................39 8.8.3 Connection to the databank of the Chambers of Commerce with InfoCamere and Registro Imprese (Telemaco).......................................................................................................................................39 8.8.4 Online Consip purchase service......................................................................................................40 8.9 E-government between Central Public Administration (PAC) and Small Enterprises.......................40 8.10 Future trends of E-Government in Italy................................................................................................41 8.10.1 2007 Report Submitted to the Parliament on the Progress of the Public Administration.........41 8.10.2 Public Administration Digitalization and the Relationships with the Citizens............................42 8.10.3 The Guide-lines for Legislation....................................................................................................42 8.10.4 SPC – The System for Public Connectivity.................................................................................43 8.10.5 VoIP for Rapid Saving .................................................................................................................44 8.10.6 Beyond CAD.................................................................................................................................44 8.10.7 The First Initiatives at International Level ...................................................................................44 8.10.8 The Re-launch of Cooperation with Developing Countries and Emerging Countries...............45 8.10.9 Collaboration under the EU and OECD in PA Innovation and Modernization..........................45 8.11 CISIS – Inter-regional Centre for IT, Geographic and Statistical Systems .......................................45 ‘Ž Ž¡™Ž›’Ž—ŒŽ ’— œ˜—’Š 9.1 Political structure...................................................................................................................................49 9.2 Information Society Indicators..............................................................................................................49 9.3 Introduction to E-governance in Estonia..............................................................................................50 9.4 Transforming Estonia into E-Stonia .....................................................................................................51 9.5 E-governance Legislation.....................................................................................................................52 9.6 E-governance Organizational Framework...........................................................................................54 9.7 E-Government Initiatives ......................................................................................................................55 9.8 E-services..............................................................................................................................................55 9.8.1 E-Government Portal........................................................................................................................56 9.8.2 Electronic Riigi Teataja.....................................................................................................................56 ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 3
  4. 4. 9.8.3 Public Procurement..........................................................................................................................57 9.8.4 Customs eSystems...........................................................................................................................58 9.8.5 e-Tax Board......................................................................................................................................58 9.8.6 Land Information System.................................................................................................................59 9.9 Other e-Systems...................................................................................................................................61 9.9.1 Estonian Government of Ministers Session Infosystem.................................................................61 9.9.2 E-State Treasury...............................................................................................................................61 9.9.3 Centre of Registers of the Ministry of Justice..................................................................................62 9.9.4 Services of the Court Settlements Register ....................................................................................62 9.10 Target Programmes and Projects........................................................................................................62 9.10.1 Document Management ..............................................................................................................62 9.10.2 X-Road..........................................................................................................................................63 9.10.3 ID Card.........................................................................................................................................67 9.10.4 Digital Signature...........................................................................................................................68 9.10.5 Citizen’s IT Environment..............................................................................................................68 9.10.6 E-Justice Project..........................................................................................................................69 9.10.7 E-County Project..........................................................................................................................70 9.10.8 E-Voting........................................................................................................................................70 9.11 E-Governance Academy, a referent institution in Estonia..................................................................70 9.12 Key Success Factors and Future Plans...............................................................................................71 9.13 History of Data Protection in ESTONIA...............................................................................................73 9.14 Data Protection Inspectorate................................................................................................................73 9.14.1 Area of activity of the Inspectorate..............................................................................................74 9.14.2 Structure and Principal functions of structural units...................................................................75 9.15 European Projects:................................................................................................................................78 9.16 The AS Sertifitseerimiskeskus (SK Certificate Centre).......................................................................79 9.17 E-government: The Estonian Government examines the Italian Model.............................................80 —’’Š’ŸŽœ Š— ž—’— •’—Žœ 10.1 IDABC Programme...............................................................................................................................82 10.2 E-content Plus.......................................................................................................................................82 10.3 VII Framework Programme – Cooperation Programme (2007-2013) ................................................82 10.4 The Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP).................................................83 10.4.1 Information Communication Technologies Policy support Programme (ICT PSP) ..................83 ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 4
  5. 5. 10.5 Looking for a European Standard for e-Government..........................................................................83 œŽž• ’—”œ ˜› œ˜—’Š œŽž• ’—”œ ˜› Š•¢ œŽž• ’—”œ ˜› ’‹•’˜›Š™‘¢ ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 5
  6. 6. Œ˜™Ž ˜ ‘Ž ˜Œž–Ž—The first part of this document, drawn up within the Twinning Light Bosnia-Herzegovina project “CapacityBuilding of the Directorate for CIPS (Citizen Identification Protection System)”, aims to provide an assessmenton the CIPS organization, structure and the functions performed by the agency.The second part of the document has been structured as a comparative study concerning e-governmentbetween Bosnia-Herzegovina, Estonia and Italy. The reason why Italy and Estonia were chosen is becauseItaly was selected as Twinning partner in order to strengthen the Capacity Building of the Directorate for CIPS,while Estonia because it represents a best practice in Europe and also hosted a study visit from the BiHpartners. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 6
  7. 7. Š‹•Ž ˜ Š‹‹›ŽŸ’Š’˜—œ BiH CIPS Citizen Identification Protection System MIA Ministry of Internal Affairs DGS National Boarder Police SIPA State Investigation and Protection Agency NOC / MOC Network Operation System / Mrezni operativni system MUP Ministarstvo unutrasnjih poslova / Ministry of Interior MIP Ministarstvo inostranih poslova / Ministry of External Affairs ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 7
  8. 8. Ž—Ž›Š• ˜ŸŽ›Ÿ’Ž  ˜— ‘Ž ŠŽ—Œ¢ ’—›˜žŒ’˜—As BiH has entered the process of European integrations, pursuant to European Regulations #2252/2004dated December 2004, 6WDQGDUGV IRU 6HFXULW )HDWXUHV DQG %LRPHWULFV LQ 3DVVSRUWV DQG 7UDYHO RFXPHQWVissued by EU Member States have been defined. The above-mentioned Regulation in its Article 3, paragraph2 defines that any member state shall establish an institution that will deal with development and coordinationof the development of the system for passports and travel docs with other member states and while doing so,follow the relevant standards. This role has been given to the Ministry for Civil Affairs but consideringcapacities of the same, BiH Council of Ministers established the Directorate for Implementation of CIPSProject (CIPS Directory) as an autonomous body within the Ministry for Civil Affairs.Importantly, in 2001 BiH initiated the process for reform of issuance of personal documents, what made itnecessary for Directorate of Implementation of CIPS Project to evolve in an administrative organization inaccordance with the mentioned Regulations.According to the provision IV, 4 a) of the Constitution of BiH, in July 2008, BiH Parliamentary Assemblyadopted the Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Register Data Exchange of Bosnia andHerzegovina. This Law in entirety amends the Law on Central Register and Data Exchange of Bosnia andHerzegovina («Official Gazette BiH» No. 32/01). Namely, the Chapter 2 of this Law defines the establishmentof the Central Centre for Data Processing as the sector of the Ministry of Civil Affairs.The grounds for adoption of the mentioned Law are the scope and character of activities performed by theexisting Directorate for Implementation of CIPS Project as a body with the higher level of expertise anddominant application of expert and scientifically methods of work and related administrative jobs.Unfortunately, organisational problems of Directorate, reflected in the internal audit report for 2005, as well asfailed attempt to establish the Agency for Information Society, which would be linked to CIPS Directorate, hascaused this project to fail.The CIPS Agency was established on basis of the following laws: x Law on Personal Identification Number; x Law on Domicile and Place of Residence of BiH citizens; x Law on Personal Identification; x Law on Protection of Personal Data; x Law on Central Register and Data Exchange.2QJRLQJ VLWXDWLRQ DQG IXWXUH GHYHORSPHQWThe recently adopted Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Registers and Data Exchange of Bosniaand Herzegovina has initiated number of changes within CIPS Agency. Management of the CIPS Agency iscurrently developing the new organizational structure that will reflect the mentioned changes. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 8
  9. 9. 7KH ,36 DJHQF PDQGDWHThe CIPS Agency is an autonomous administrative organisation within the Ministry of Civil Affairs of Bosniaand Herzegovina responsible for the area of identification documents, storage, personalisation and transport ofdocuments, and central keeping of registers and exchange of data between the relevant organs in Bosnia andHerzegovina.As the newly adopted Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Registers and Data Exchange of BiHstates that the CIPS Agency is responsible for all activities related to identification documents, registers andexchange of personal data. CIPS Agency cooperates with the relevant institutions that are the source of datain Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as with other institutions/agencies, which are the users of Agency’sservices.For its mandate CIPS Agency must act solely on professional basis, without representing, protecting, orsubverting the interests of any political party, registered organisation or associations, nor any of the threeconstitutive or other nationalities of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Altho ug h the Ag enc y w a s e sta b lished a s a tem p o ra ry b o d y w ho se ro le w a s to b eterm ina ted up o n im p le m enta tio n o f the CIPS Pro jec t, the Ag e nc y’ s a c tivitie s sinc e2001 a s w ell a s va rio us la w s, m em o ra nd a a nd d ec isio ns o f the c o unc il o f Ministe r’ sha ve turne d w o rk o f this b o d y to p erm a nent sta tus.)81,1*The earlier mentioned Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Registers and Data Exchange of BiHdefines that the funds necessary to finance operation of the Agency will be provided from the Budget of theInstitutions of Bosnia and Herzegovina and international obligations of Bosnia and Herzegovina.The income of the Agency, generated by collecting defined fees for issuing of the identification documents andother realized fees for Agency’s services, will constitute the Budget revenues.The Council of Ministers if Bosnia and Herzegovina, at the proposal of the Agency, will define the price ofidentification documents, other documents and services. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 9
  10. 10. œ›žŒž›ŽAs mentioned above, the main Agency’s offices (NOC) are located in: 1. Sarajevo 2. Banja LukaThe recently adopted Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Registers and Data Exchange of BiH hasdefined the main office of the Agency moving from Sarajevo in Banja Luka what will cause changes of thecurrent staffing structure.The basic organisational units of the Agency will be located out of the seat. Organisational unit of the Agencyout of its seat is the Centre for Storage, Personalisation and Transport of Personal Documents with the seat inBanja Luka. 6FKHPH RI WKH $JHQF¶V UHODWLRQVKLSV ZLWK H[WHUQDO XVHUVx “P location” is the Center or Personalization of Documents.x “D locations” are the main location for each canton/ District Brcko / RS regional office. These locations are responsible for work of their “C locations”. There is one “D locations” in each of 10 Cantons, 9 locations of Republika Srpska (following its geographical scope) as well as 1 location in District Brcko. These locations serve as administrative offices of CIPS i.e. link between “C locations” and CIPS.x “C locations” are the “grassroots” locations i.e. offices within municipalities where the final project beneficiaries submit their requests and collect finalized documents. There are 100 “C locations” in 97 municipalities of BiH. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 10
  11. 11. 11 £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ PRNJAVOR NEUM LAKTASI MOSTAR KOTOR VAROS KONJIC KNEZEVO JABLANICA GRADISKA CITLUK CELINAC CAPLJINA 083 +1. 0267$5 /8.$ BANJA LUKA 083 56 -% %$1-$ GORAZDE 083 %3. *25$=( 6536.$ 5(38%/,.$ %L+ )((5$,-$ The following table lists D and C locations that cooperate with CIPS Agency: 0DS ZLWK 1202 ORFDWLRQ DQG ³ ORFDWLRQV´ RQ D C R P eV ``p • P UFpsrd4q T • D ai Y C YQ b¤G`e!W • Fc T `b!h • !¦bbt R Sv FP T • MOC T u RQ F P F U`eU¦Uer T V Uu D`W • !UI RW F • a U¦p D V u FP • a GU`f D V P T u • F D VR `g !`f • S F P t DQ V T a P U¦G!eGdBq • !`¦!p FWfY • Q TC T G`bUS • H F GGE D!C F DQ W R D ¦V e``eQ `C • • T ac P d¦U`C • F a Y W FQ V F G`XUC P T SR D P GU!¤Q I • RQ F P e¤ib¦GT •
  12. 12. PROZOR/RAMA SRBAC STOLAC BIJELJINA 083 56 -% BOSANSKO GRAHOVO LOPARE %,-(/-,1$ DRVAR UGLJEVIK GLAMOC BROD 083 . /,912 KUPRES DERVENTA LIVNO DOBOJ TOMISLAVGRAD MODRICA HADZICI 083 56 -% 2%2- PELAGICEVO ILIDZA PETROVO ILIJAS SAMAC NOVO SARAJEVO TESLIC083 .6 6$5$-(92 SARAJEVO CENTAR VUKOSAVLJE SARAJEVO NOVI GRAD CAJNICE SARAJEVO STARI GRAD FOCA TRNOVO-FBIH KALINOVIK 083 56 6-% )2$ VOGOSCA NOVO GORAZDE DOMALJEVAC RUDO 083 25$6-( ODZAK VISEGRAD ORASJE HAN PIJESAK BUGOJNO ISTOCNO SARAJEVO BUSOVACA PS ISTOCNO SARAJEVO 083 56 -% DOBRETICI ,67212 ROGATICA 6$5$-(92 DONJI VAKUF SOKOLAC FOJNICA TRNOVO GORNJI VAKUF/USKOPLJE CJB ISTOCNO SARAJEVO083 6%. 75$91,. JAJCE ISTOCNI DRVAR KISELJAK JEZERO KRESEVO KUPRES-RS 083 56 6-% NOVI TRAVNIK MRKONJIC GRAD 05.21-, *5$ TRAVNIK PETROVAC VITEZ RIBNIK 083 7. 78=/$ BANOVICI SIPOVO CELIC 083 56 6-% KOSTAJNICA 35,-(25 DOBOJ ISTOK KOZARSKA DUBICA ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 12
  13. 13. GRACANICA KRUPA NA UNI GRADACAC NOVI GRAD KALESIJA OSTRA LUKA KLADANJ PRIJEDOR LUKAVAC BERKOVICI SAPNA BILECA SREBRENIK 083 56 -% GACKO 75(%,1-( TEOCAK LJUBINJE TUZLA NEVESINJE ZIVINICE TREBINJE BIHAC BRATUNAC BOSANSKA KRUPA MILICI BOSANSKI PETROVAC 083 56 6-% SREBRENICA =9251,. BUZIM SEKOVICI 083 86. %,+$ CAZIN VLASENICA KLJUC ZVORNIK SANSKI MOST VELIKA KLADUSA BREZA DOBOJ JUG ,675,.7 %5.2 KAKANJ 9/$$ %5.2 MAGLAJ ,675,.7$ -$91, JAVNI REGISTAR 5(*,67$5 %5.2 OLOVO TESANJ 083 =. =(1,$ USORA VARES VISOKO ZAVIDOVICI ZENICA ZEPCE GRUDE 083 =+=. LJUBUSKI /-8%86., POSUSJE SIROKI BRIJEG ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 13
  14. 14. ,36 FHQWUH RI 6DUDMHYRCurrently, the main office of the CIPS Agency is located in Sarajevo, inside of the BiH Parliamentary building.Both the main functions of the Agency and the main Network Operation Center are located in the main office inSarajevo.The main functions of the main office is to provide: x Nomenclatures (naming specifications) ? x Acquisition of data x PIN x Domicile-place of residence x Personal Identification x Driving licenses x Registration of vehicles x Travel documents x Personalisation of documents x Distribution of documents x Development of projects x Development of application software x Purchase of IT equipment x Installation x Communications x Testing x Data security an protection x Education of approx. 750 officers x Organisation of SW and HW x Provision of operating supplies ,36 FHQWUH RI %DQMD /XNDThe second Network Operation Center (NOC), location where the data is replicated from the main site, islocated in Banja Luka. This is also where location of the “Centre for personalization of Documents”, locationwhere new documents are personalized following requests of BiH citizens.The types of documents personalized in Banja Luka are: x Personal identifications x Driving licenses x Travel documents x Personal identifications for non-residents (foreign citizens) ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 14
  15. 15. RRSHUDWLRQ PHFKDQLVPV ZLWK RWKHU LQVWLWXWLRQDO ERGLHVRoles and responsibilities for maintenance of network/databases[…]Regional and local institution roles: x C locations x D locations According to the CIPS Agency’s report for 2007, during this year was initiated process for transfer of data through web services meaning that access to data would be enabled to some legal bodies after those fulfill certain conditions, mostly related to personal security of data and also to follow the procedures set by the CIPS network team. External users that have fulfilled the mentioned conditions have received needed instructions.The “external users “of the CIPS system are: x Education institutions x Statistics offices x Register offices x Army x Police x Border Police x Custom offices x Judiciary system x Insurance Bureau BiH x Bank x Tax administration x Other offices as defined by the Law. ,36 LQIRUPDWLRQ VVWHPThe CIPS information system is composed of four modules or subsystems: x Place of Residence, Personal Identification Number, and Personal Identification Documents x Driving Licenses x Travel Documents x Vehicle Registration ,36 ,QWHUQDWLRQDO DFWLYLWLHVBesides these responsibilities, Directorate CIPS was direct or indirect partner in the implementation of someCARDS projects like the ones listed below: ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 15
  16. 16. ,QIRUPDWLRQ PLJUDWLRQ VVWHP 0,6
  17. 17. $56 The goal of the project was to construct and implement a Migration Information System for the government ofBosnia and Herzegovina (BIH). At the Network Operational Centre (NOC) in Sarajevo, the central database isstored and a mirror of this database is located in NOC Banja Luka. In all the other locations it’s possible toconnect to the central database and relevant information will be entered into the database and it is possible tosee the status of the procedures a foreigner is processing in BIH. The MIS provides information that assist theparties involved to manage migration information, data collection, processing and dissemination by keepingrecords of the stay and movement of aliens who have been admitted to BIH, including : x All residence permits that have been issued by the MoS x Foreign nationals that have been admitted to BIH with visas x Foreign nationals who have been ordered to leave BIH and/or been put under supervision until they are removed x Foreign nationals who have entered BIH as a result of a readmission agreement x A file tracking system for the administrative decisions related to aliens x The MIS will be integrated with other national information systems6QFKURQRXV LJLWDO +LHUDUFK 6+ FRPPXQLFDWLRQ QHWZRUN $56 This telecommunication network system improved coordination between institutional units that are responsiblefor the provision of security measures by using digital exchange of information, access to central databasesand access through integrated communications. This project removed organizational and operative problemssurrounding the use of confidential information and ensured that the use and exchange of information wasmore secure.6XSSRUW WR WKH 2IILFH RI WKH RRUGLQDWRU IRU 3XEOLF $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ 5HIRUP(1.5 MEUR) - CARDS 2004This project assisted the PAR Coordination Office with the drawing-up and implementation of a comprehensivenation-wide PAR strategy. In addition, the project also built-up the capacity of the PARCO; particularly in thearea of PAR policy making and coordination and procurement of PAR projects through the newly establishedPAR fund, which pools funds from DfID, Sida and the Dutch Government.H *RYHUQPHQW 0 (852
  18. 18. $56 This project was aimed at enhancing the efficiency of the Council of Ministers BIH through the introduction andutilization of a comprehensive and crosscutting set of ICT tools and solutions, as well as through necessary re-engineering of Council of Ministries BiH-CoM business processes. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 16
  19. 19. Š ˜›Š—’£Š’˜—The Law defines that internal affairs of the CIPS Agency will be defined by the Rulebook on InternalOrganisation and Systematisation of the Agency. The Rulebook will regulate internal organisation of theAgency, including job descriptions, number, name and locations of the basic organizational units. The Agencywill hire “civil servants” whose employment will be governed by the Law on Civil Service in BiH Institutions and“other employees” whose employment will be governed by the Labor Law in BiH Institutions. Structure ofemployees will reflect national structure and take care of gender equality.The Law on Agency for Identification Documents, Registers and Data Exchange of BiH has defined the rolesand responsibilities as well as other details related to the Managing Director and Deputy Managing Director ofCIPS Agency. 2UJDQLVDWLRQ DQG PDQDJHPHQWThe standards of the functioning of the Centre, as well as all other matters relevant for the functioning of theCentre, are stipulated by by-laws enacted by the Council of Ministers, at the proposal of the Director of theAgency, while internal organisation and systematisation of jobs in the Centre shall be stipulated by theRulebook on Internal Organisation and Systematisation of the Agency. CIPSThe current organizational chart of theCIPS Agency is composed by the Directorfollowing roles: x Managing director Director’s Office x Deputy director x Managers of the Technical Sector Sector for Finance, Center for Storage, Legal, HR and Personalization and Organisational units (Sectors) General Issues Transport of Docs x Departments within the Dept for Administration Dept for Legal, Dept for Storage Dept for Standardization Sectors and Development Sarajevo HR and General Issues and Personalization of Docs and Security of Docs Dept for System Dept for Finance Dept for Distribution Dept for Administration Protection and and Procurement and Transport and Development Logistics of Docs Banja Luka Dept for Maintenance and Internal Security or Premises0DQDJLQJ LUHFWRUThe Managing Director manages the Agency’s operations and is responsible towards the Ministers of theCouncil of Ministers for the performance of the Agency and his work.Director of Agency have the following duties and responsibilities: x To represent the Agency; x To produce the annual plan of work in accordance with the guidelines of the Ministry and Council of Ministers, and other plans concerning the competence of the Agency; ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 17
  20. 20. x To produce the Annual Budget Plan, in accordance with the Law of Financing of the Institutions of Bosnia and Herzegovina; x To manage and direct the performance of the tasks under the competence of the Agency; x To contribute in drafting of national plan of activities that defines the issues in the area of identification documents and resources for data transfer in Bosnia and Herzegovina; x To propose to the Ministry the launching of negotiations related to conclusion of international agreements on cooperation in relation to the issues of development of identification documents and scope of work of the Agency as provided for in Article of this Law; x Pursuant to the Law on Administration, to submit the Annual Report x To control the performance of the Agency; x To carry out the necessary analyses of the rational deployment of employees and technical resources of the Agency; x To ensure cooperation with the Ministry, relevant organs of Bosnia and Herzegovina to act in accordance with this Law, and other relevant authorities and institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina; x To ensure implementation of international agreements and conventions in domain of identification documents, which Bosnia and Herzegovina has ratified.In addition to the duties and responsibilities Director performs other tasks, like: x In accordance with the Law on Administration, Director proposes the Rulebook on Internal Organisation to the Council of Ministers, as well as other regulations necessary to perform tasks under the competence of the Agency; x To delegate duties to Deputy Director and managers of organisational units of the Agency, pursuant to the Law, Rulebook on Internal Organisation and other regulations; x To make final decisions on recruitment, deployment and termination of employment of civil servants and employees in the Agency, according to the laws of Bosnia and Herzegovina; x To prepare and implement the program of specific trainings and education of the employees in the Agency; x Director is accountable for legitimate functioning of the Agency and for legitimate spending of budget and other resources dedicated for the financing of the Agency; x To perform other duties stipulated by the laws and other regulations.HSXW LUHFWRUThe Deputy Director is responsible to Managing Director of the Agency for her/his work.The Deputy Director is the acting Director in the period of Managing Director’s absence, and performs theduties entrusted to her/him by the Director. If the Director is impeded to perform his duties and responsibilities,the Deputy Director shall perform it, until the Director is able to assume it or until the appointment of the newDirector.Director and Deputy Director are appointed by the Council of Ministers, in accordance with the Law onMinisterial Appointments (’’Official Gazette of BiH’’, No.: 37/03).Director and Deputy Director are in charge for five years, with the possibility of a reappointment in the nextmandate. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 18
  21. 21. 19 £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡descriptions of all other employees of the Agency.The Rulebook on Internal Organisation and Systematisation of Agency will define locations, number and job 2WKHU VWDIIUROHV
  22. 22. ŽŒž›’¢ Š››Š—Ž–Ž—œ ™˜•’Œ’ŽœThe purpose of “CIPS” data security and protection is to prevent potential hazard for data, information andprocesses in data processing. Generally, we can divide these risks into the following: x Natural disasters; x Technical problems; x Abuse of power; x Human factor;In the personalization centre of Banja Luka are considered the following security issues: x Security of non-personalized documents x Security of document production/personalisation process x Central Vault -Daily vault x Daily vault -Production x Production - Control x Control – Packing x Security in storing personalized documents x Security of distribution of the documents from the Personalisation Centre to the citizens 5LVNV DQG PLWLJDWLRQ PHDVXUHV
  23. 23. CIPS provides the following risk mitigation measures: x Protection measures adopted by CIPS: x Protection through introduced physical measures; x Protection via software solutions; x Data back-up; x Protection via programmed controls; x Protection via control of data access; x Protection in recruitment process; x Description of the activities in case of system crash; x Development of data security and protection plan; ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 20
  24. 24. ˜–™Š›Š’ŸŽ ŠŠ ‹Ž ŽŽ— ˜œ—’Š Š— Ž›£Ž˜Ÿ’—Š œ˜—’Š Š— Š•¢The second part document is based on the examination of a series of studies implemented by differentorganisations on the level of implementation of e-government and e-governance in Europe and in the World. Inparticular it examined a Report carried out by the United Nations, “UN E-Government Survey 2008”, whichlooks at the state of art of e-government and e-participation processes which have been implemented in 192Countries.The United Nations claim that even if some progresses have been made, there is still a lot to do. The UnitedNation Report’s sub-title this year is “From e-Government to Connected Governance” to underline the need toalways think more about e-government in an articulated and integrated way which can both simplify therelationships between the Institutions and the citizens and at the same time be a tool to guarantee a strongeradministrative efficacy and efficiency. The report also provides an overview on the most significantexperiences that exist at different national levels and also makes a classification of e-government and e-participation in the world’s countries.For what concerns HJRYHUQPHQW UHDGLQHVV UDQNLQJV, ltaly ranks 27th in a list where Sweden has overtakenthe United States and confirmed its supremacy among the Scandinavian countries with Denmark and Norwayranking respectively second and third. Estonia ranks 13th and Bosnia is 94th. According to this report, theprogresses in the e-government sector have been very slow and only few governments have made thenecessary investments to shift from single e-government initiatives to a more integrated e-governancestrategy. In this year’s e-government readiness rankings, European countries account for 70 per cent of thetop 35 countries. Asian countries account for 20 per cent of the top 35 and countries in North America andOceania for 5 per cent. European countries as a group have invested heavily in deploying broadbandinfrastructure, coupled with an increase in the implementation of e-government applications for their citizens.Yet, according to the ITU, European countries account for nine of the top ten countries in broadbandsubscribers per hundred citizens, with Denmark, the Netherlands and Iceland heading the chart.5HJLRQDO $YHUDJH RI H*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV IURP WKH 8QLWHG 1DWLRQ 5HSRUWThe Figure above clearly shows the difference between the five regions, with Europe (0.6490) having anobvious lead over the other regions, followed by the Americas (0.4936), Asia (0.4470), Oceania (0.4338) andAfrica (0.2739). Asia and Oceania are slightly below the world average (0.4514), while Africa lags far behind. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 21
  25. 25. The 5HJLRQDO H*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV 5DQNLQJV table pictured below shows a further breakdown by sub-regions for Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. In the African region, there is a big gap betweenthe West African region and the Northern and Southern African regions. The Central and Eastern Africaregions are close in rankings, with Eastern Africa ranking slightly higher. In the Americas, North America isdominated by the United States, yet Canada is far ahead of the Caribbean, and of the Central and SouthAmerican regions. The regions of the Caribbean and of Central America are close to the world average, withthe South American region ranking slightly above.5HJLRQDO (*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV 5DQNLQJV IURP WKH 8QLWHG 1DWLRQ 5HSRUWIn the Asian region, there is a major gap between Eastern Asia and the other regions. It should be noted thatthe regions of Central and Southern Asia are far below the world average. In the European region, there is asignificant gap between Northern and Western Europe and Eastern and Southern Europe. Europe is the onlyregion that has all of its sub-regions above the world average.In (*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV in Europe, The Czech Republic (0.6696) has taken the lead in the EasternEuropean region, followed by Hungary (0.6494) and Poland (0.6134). The overall rankings in 2008 do notdiffer too much from those in 2005. The notable exception is Ukraine, which moved up seven positions tonumber 41. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 22
  26. 26. (*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV LQ (XURSH IURP WKH 8QLWHG 1DWLRQ 5HSRUW(*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV IRU (DVWHUQ (XURSHThe Ministry of Finance of Poland http://www.mf.gov.pl/ provides citizens with information on its World BankGrant in an effort to strengthen its auditing functions and on its public debt. It also has a feature that allowscitizens to calculate its treasury bonds accrued interest over time. The Czech Republic’s national websitehttp://www.vlada.cz/ was rated the highest in this group. This site provides links to all of its advisory bodiesand working councils. The site also has Really Simple Syndication, which allows it to be frequently updated tohandle blogs and other feeds. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 23
  27. 27. (*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV IRU 1RUWKHUQ (XURSHOver the past year, the United Kingdom has revamped its government online system, through an initiative topare down the numerous (hundreds) government websites available to the public. The UK’s main governmentportal, http://www.directgov.uk/, was redesigned in 2008 and this appears to have resulted in a drop in the webmeasure rankings for the UK. Yet, the Directgov.uk website (‘Public service all in one place’) does one of thebest jobs in bringing together information and services from the central government as well as from localauthorities. The main site is filled with information, and has a consolidated directory and services listing for thecentral government with local authorities, as well as excellent additional linkages to local government servicesand resources. Furthermore, the main site has new citizen communications features, such as a mobilegovernment portal and a separate business gateway http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/. While the UK nationalsite may have slipped in the rankings, the site thanks to its comprehensive information and services, coveringdifferent levels of government, still provides good value to the citizen users. It should be noted that allcountries in Northern Europe are in the top 20 per cent of the infrastructure, education and web measurementindices, as well as the e-government readiness index.The Social Security and Labour Ministry of Lithuania http://www.socmin.lt/ provides an online English-Lithuanian dictionary of social terms, employment and health topics. It also gives advice on how to find work,with the option of consulting a government official via the Internet.(*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV IRU 6RXWKHUQ (XURSH ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 24
  28. 28. Spain (0.7228) has improved tremendously since 2005 and has taken the lead in this region by moving up 19positions to the 20th spot. Spain has improved immensely on the web measure index, as well as on theinfrastructure index. On the infrastructure side, the deployment of broadband increased the number of PCs per100 inhabitants from 19 to 28 and Internet users per 100 inhabitants went from 24 to 43. On the web measureside, it had a separate e-government portal that strongly encourages e-participation, provides onlinetransactions on a secure link, and communication via mobile phones with citizens, providing alerts. Spain hasalso enhanced its national sites through better multimedia tools (video and audio clips). Spain’s Ministry ofFinance allows to sign-up via e-mail, to create online personal accounts on secure links, while the Ministry ofEducation has established a one-stop shop. All these improvements increased Spain’s total web measureindex. Spain’s national website http://www.la-moncloa.es has a separate portal dedicated to e-government.The website also has a strong business focus thanks to the ‘Spain Business’ section, which is aimed atattracting foreign investment in Spain. The site appears in several languages including: Japanese, Chinese,Russian, German, Portuguese and English. Spain was followed by Slovenia (0.6681) and Italy (0.6680). Malta(0.6582), the leader in the 2005 survey of this region, is fourth in the 2008 Survey. The national website ofSlovenia http://e-uprava.gov.si/e-uprava/en/portal.euprava is to be commended for having a user-friendly one-stop shop. It also has a section that allows visually impaired citizens to navigate through the website. TheGovernment of Slovenia is planning further enhancements to the portal to assist the blind and visuallyimpaired. An external visitor site http://www.slovenia.si/ also provides a wealth of information and resourcesfor visitors to Slovenia and for businesses that are potentially seeking opportunities in the emerging economyof the nation. The system also includes a separate portal for Slovenia participation in the European Union, shttp://evropa.gov.si/ , ‘Slovenia, at Home in Europe’.(*RYHUQPHQW 5HDGLQHVV IRU :HVWHUQ (XURSH ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 25
  29. 29. The Netherlands (0.8631), France (0.8038) and Luxembourg (0.7512) have made tremendous progress since2005, moving up the e-government readiness survey to rank 5th, 9th and 14th respectively. Germany as resultof a lower web measure score dropped from 11th to 22nd this year. France’s national website www.premier-ministre.gouv.fr scored the highest in the region. The site has a strong e-participation presence and hasfeatures for online consultation, has a separate e-government portal and has instituted a time frame torespond to citizen’s queries and e-mails. The site also contains a number of news feeds and RSS tocontinuously update citizens with information from the media and blogs. Malta’s Health Ministry is an excellentexample of providing customer services online. The portal allows citizens to apply for the European HealthInsurance Card online. It has an electronic patient library that runs thanks to a partnership with a private firm,which provides citizens with a medical encyclopaedia, information on surgeries and procedures, and hasanimated lessons. The portal also provides its citizens with a list of local pharmacies.http://www.ehealth.gov.mt/article.aspx?art=90. Aware of major policy proposals and priorities of thegovernment, The Netherlands’s national website http://www.overheid.nl provides its citizens with a robustportal that contains all of its available information on the front page. One of the interesting features is thehistory of the Netherlands, which offers an historic background of the country. Another interesting featurewhich does not appear in other national sites is the feature on driver licences in the country. This section, onthe front page of the site, provides citizens and foreigners with a quick and simple way of obtaining informationon driver licences.With regards to HSDUWLFLSDWLRQ, which is considered as the use of New Technologies that enable governmentsto dialogue with their citizens, the report’s top five spots are taken by the United States, South Korea,Denmark, France and Australia. Estonia ranks 8th, Italy ranks 56th and Bosnia 99th. The report highlights thatit examined only the use of New Technologies by Central Public Administrations to increase the participation inpublic life, while it does not examine what happens in the e-democracy field at local level.(3DUWLFLSDWLRQ ,QGH[ 7RS RXQWULHVIf we make a comparison with a similar report which was carried out in 2005, a general improvement byGovernments in the HGHPRFUDF sector can be noticed, even if, the researchers underline, the mostsignificant progresses have been made in the provision of information of public interest which are propaedeuticto citizens’ participation in public life (HLQIRUPDWLRQ). Fewer progresses have been made in the provision of ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 26
  30. 30. listening and dialogue tools (HFRQVXOWDWLRQ), in terms of concrete effects of such processes on the governmentactions (HGHFLVLRQ PDNLQJ). 1DWLRQDO 3URJUHVV 5HSRUW RQ H*RYHUQPHQW LQ WKH (8The National Progress Report reveals impressive achievements in e-Government across the EU. A NationalProgress Report on e-Government in the EU27+, was presented at the Ministerial e-Government Conferenceon 19 September 2007 in Lisbon. This meeting was attended by 22 e-Government Ministers, who reviewedprogress made in the implementation of e-Government Services since the launch of the EuropeanCommission’s i2010 initiative for Growth and Jobs (2005), the Manchester Ministerial Declaration (2005) andthe i2010 e-Government Action Plan agreed by the Council in June 2006. Most Member States policies andimplementation actions are now in place and aligned with the goals of the Action Plan. Services are becomingmore effective nationally and more interoperable at European level, delivering higher quality, saving billions ofeuros through efficiency gains, and increasing the transparency and accountability of administrations.The National Progress Report also registers impressive progress in transforming public administrations,thereby boosting economic growth by placing citizens and businesses at the centre of government services.Member States have developed and agreed roadmaps for mutual recognition and authentication of electronicidentities, for cross-border e-Procurement and for inclusive e-Government. Equally important is the effort toreduce administrative burdens for both citizens and businesses, the increasing level of e-Participation activity,and the willingness of public administrations to share good practices.The achievements of Member States has been further confirmed by the independent survey The userchallenge: Benchmarking the supply of online public services undertaken for the Commission by Capgeminiand published in September 2007. While progress has been impressive, work needs to continue. Stock will betaken again at the next Ministerial e-Government Conference in Stockholm in 2009, during the SwedishPresidency. (8 %HQFKPDUN 6XUYH RI The EU Benchmark Survey of 2007 “Full report”: The user challenge - Benchmarking the supply of onlinepublic services - 7th measurement confirms that Member States are making significant progress in e-Government. Europe continues to make sound progress on the supply of on-line public services. The maturityof online public services in the EU keeps improving. They have now reached an overall level of sophisticationthat full two-way interaction between citizens and Governments is the norm. In fact they are moving rapidlytowards the stage where a whole process can be conducted on-line: 58% of services now allow the citizen toreceive a public service conducted fully on-line, 8% more than in 2006. This means better, more efficient andeffective public service provision for both citizens and businesses. For the first time, the survey assessed thenational portals and found that Governments have invested in delivering these as a high quality, convenient,trusted and branded route for the provision of public services. The survey has also looked at the usersexperience when accessing on-line public services, recognizing the growing importance of this topic.Once again, Austria leads the online public service league with a nearly perfect score, followed by Malta,Portugal and Slovenia. Businesses are still being better served than citizens, although the gap between thetwo is closing. Since 2001, this survey has measured the share of public services fully available on line in theEU, plus Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and for the first time this year, Turkey.The different degrees of sophistication of online public services range from ‘basic’ information provision to ‘full’electronic case handling (fully available online) and proactive, personalised service delivery. This proactivestage was introduced this year for the first time as an indication of the emergence of intelligent servicedelivery we are now seeing in the EU. Services for business still score well above those for citizens on both ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 27
  31. 31. counts. Sophistication for businesses lies at 84%, whereas for citizens it is at 70%. The difference is greater interms of full availability, with 70% of services for businesses fully available on line against 50% for citizens.Austria, the Czech Republic, Portugal and Malta have achieved 100% fully-online availability for businesses.However, in the past year the gap has reduced considerably, and services for citizens saw a marked growthcompared to previous surveys. In the UK, Finland, Norway and Slovenia citizens are now served just as wellas businesses. For the first time in this edition the survey examined three elements which are important to theuser experience: the provision of a legally recognised, secure electronic identity; whether the service could beaccessed via alternative channels such as call centres, kiosks, mobile phones and TV; and compliance of thewebsites with the International Accessibility Guidelines. The overall result for this indicator is more mixed andaverages at 19%, with Austria, Bulgaria and Norway scoring above 30%. The most striking finding was thatonly 5% of websites make a specific reference to their compliance with international accessibility guidelines(WAI). National portals fared much better. The report looked at the number of basic public services which canbe accessed from the portal, the existence of customized options, ease of navigation and whether itspresentation is targeted at different kinds of users (businesses vs. citizens, focussing on events or thestructure of the administration). The overall score of 75% demonstrates that national governments considertheir national portal as one of the cornerstones of their e-Government plans.With regards to Estonia, it scores well in the 2007 survey, with a level of fully-online availability of 70% and asophistication level of 87%. The poor result of online sophistication is due to a different appreciation of the fullyonline availability of certain service providers. Estonia has dropped from 2nd overall position in 2006 to theupper end of the 3rd quartile. The levels of sophistication for businesses as well as for citizens are aboveEU27+ averages.Six out of the nine relevant services achieved the pro-active sophistication level (= 67%; EU27+ average scorebeing 36%). With regards to user centricity, Estonia, with 29%, is above the EU27+ average of 19%.The assessment of the National Portal (http://www.riik.ee/en/) shows a high score equal to 88% (compared tothe average of 75%). The majority of the public services (17 out of 24 relevant services) are accessiblethrough the portal. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 28
  32. 32. The Estonian health insurance system is based on the principle of solidarity. All medical costs incurred arereimbursed by the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. Each patient pays a reduced personal contribution, whichis non-refundable. This system is only applicable for those health service providers that have a contract withthe Estonian Health Insurance Fund. Where a health service provider doesn’t have this kind of contract, apatient must pay for the service himself. Citizens which have access internet banking or are in possession ofan eID card can use eServices through the national portal to check the validity of their health insurance, theirpersonal data, the name of the family physician and the payment of sickness benefits.With regards to Italy, it has made sound progress: it scores a high overall sophistication equal to 79% and aprogression in fully-online availability equal to 70%, up from 58% - a substantial improvement to 11th position.Pro-active sophistication scores above the EU27+ average, with four out of nine relevant services reaching thefifth level of sophistication. Concerning user centricity, Italy scored 20%, just above the EU27+ average of19%. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 29
  33. 33. The National Portal offers (http://www.italia.gov.it/) access to all of the 24 basic public services: navigationpossibilities could still be improved, however all information needed to find one’s way round the site is there.The scoring in this survey for the National Portal is at 82% against an average for the EU27+ of 75%.- The crime reporting service Denuncia vi@ Web (‘Report a crime vi@ the web’) enables the public to reportlost or stolen property online. The aim of the service is to simplify procedures for filing crime reports, makingreporting a crime possible at any given time and place.- The National Portal provides a comprehensive starting point for searches related to the citizen’s services,with different search modes such as life events and themes, with a shortcut to the online services. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 30
  34. 34. 1HZ H*RYHUQPHQW XVHU VDWLVIDFWLRQ DQG XVHU LPSDFW SURMHFW LQ WKH (XURSHDQ 8QLRQThe Information Society and Media Directorate-General of the European Commission recently launched a newstudy which will contribute to the EU policy agenda on e-Government measurement and on the Efficiency andEffectiveness objectives. The project will develop a multilayer user satisfaction and impact measurementtoolkit for inclusive public eServices. Based on existing experiences and in close collaboration with theEuropean e-Government agencies, a measurement framework will be developed that will include a toolkit andcontext-based methodology: creating the new standard for inclusive e-Government user measurement. The e-Government Progress in the EU27+ report reveals that twelve countries, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France,Germany, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, The Netherlands, and the UK have put in placemeasures of user satisfaction. The approaches vary in scope and sophistication. The present EU study willestablish best practice and facilitate benchmarking across agencies, regions and countries. The measurementtoolkit will be piloted in different member states. Towards the end of 2008, the results of the pilot will bediscussed during an interactive workshop (on 14 November 2008). In the near future a discussion forum tocollect experiences and share ideas on user satisfaction assessment will be launched on the e-Practice portal. ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 31
  35. 35. ‘Ž Ž¡™Ž›’Ž—ŒŽ ’— Š•¢Basic data and indicatorsData from Eurostat updated to June 2008Population (1 000): 59 131.3 inhabitants (2007)GDP at market prices: 1 535 540.4 million Euros (2007)GDP per inhabitant in PPS (Purchasing Power Standards, EU-27 = 100): 101.4 (2007)GDP growth rate: 1.5 % (2007)Inflation rate: 2.0 % (2007)Unemployment rate: 6.1 % (2007)Government debt/GDP: 104.0 % (2007)Public balance (government deficit or surplus/GDP): -1.9 % (2007)Source: Europa Website 3ROLWLFDO 6WUXFWXUHItaly has been a Parliamentary Republic since 2 June 1946 (following a referendum that abolished theMonarchy). The legislative power is held by a bicameral Parliament made up of a Chamber of Deputies (630elected members) and a Senate (315 elected members). The members of the two Chambers are elected for aperiod of five years. The Head of State is the President of the Republic, who is elected by the Parliament (jointsession) and by 3 delegates from each of the 20 Italian regions for a seven-year term. Executive power isexercised by the Government, consisting of the Prime Minister (referred to in Italy as the President of theCouncil of Ministers) and the Ministers jointly constituting the Council of Ministers. The President appoints thePrime Minister and, on his advice, the Ministers. The Government has to enjoy the confidence of bothchambers and is answerable to Parliament. The Prime Minister conducts and is responsible for the generalpolicy of the Government. Italy is made up of 20 regions, five of which are governed according to a specialautonomous statute; it includes 103 provinces and 8 101 municipalities. The regions have legislative powertogether with the state in matters of concurrent legislation, except for fundamental principles that are reservedto state law. The regions have exclusive legislative power with respect to any matters not expressly reservedto state law. Municipalities and provinces have regulatory power with respect to the organisation and fulfilmentof the functions assigned to them. A constitutional reform promoted by the Government and adopted byParliament in October 2005 was intended to significantly extend the powers of the regions (devolution). Italiansrejected this reform via referendum on 25 and 26 June 2006. The Constitution of the Italian Republic wasadopted on 22 December 1947 and entered into force on 1 January 1948. Italy was one of the foundingmembers of the European Economic Community in 1957. ,QIRUPDWLRQ 6RFLHW ,QGLFDWRUV x Percentage of households with Internet access: 43 % (2007) x Percentage of enterprises with Internet access: 94 % (2007) ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 32
  36. 36. x Percentage of individuals using the Internet at least once a week: 34 % (2007) x Percentage of households with a broadband connection: 25 % (2007) x Percentage of enterprises with a broadband connection: 76 % (2007) x Percentage of individuals that have purchased/ordered online in the last three months: 7% (2007) x Percentage of enterprises having received orders online within the previous year: 2 % (2007) x Percentage of individuals using the Internet for interacting with public authorities: obtaining information 15.2 %, downloading forms 10.6 %, returning filled forms 4.6 % (2007) x Percentage of enterprises using the Internet for interacting with public authorities: obtaining information 74 %, downloading forms 70 %, returning filled forms 35 % (2007) 6WDWH RI HJRYHUQPHQW LPSOHPHQWDWLRQ LQ ,WDOThanks to the advent of new technological tools which are better and faster when implementing the differentoperations, a big change was registered in the modality of informing the citizens/users and to make them moreinvolved in Public Administration activities. This evolution takes the name of e-government and e-democracy.(JRYHUQPHQW, as reported by the Italian Government document “Government Guidelines for the developmentof the Information Society”, means that public administrations must fulfil some conditions if they wish to becompletely in line with new way of informing and communicating , such as: x All the priority services have to be available on-line x All the internal mail of a Public Administration must circulate via e-mail x Computer literacy has to be ensured among all eligible public employees x 2/3 of the Public Administration’s offices have to make available on-line access to the record processing by citizens x All the offices which provide services have to include a customer satisfaction system.Following the i2010 strategy, the national “Action Plan for Information Society”, which includes, among othersectors, the “E-government”, was launched in 2000.The plan implementation featured a strong collaboration, which allowed in a first stage the on-line servicesimplementation - aimed both at citizens and enterprises - and then infrastructural services implementation. Thesecond stage of the Plan included the strengthening and the territorial extension of the experiences alreadytested and some new initiatives for e-Democracy development.Since January 2006 The Code of the Digital Administration (Codice dell’amministrazione digitale - CAD) hasbeen in force, laying down the rules on how to implement a more efficient Public Administration, with lesswaste and fewer costs. CAD offers, to both enterprises and citizens, the right to interact always andeverywhere with the Administrations through the network and, at the same time, it obliges all theAdministrations to make all information available on-line.At the beginning of 2007 the Minister for Innovation and Reforms in the Public Administration, Luigi Nicolais,presented the e-government strategy guidelines, which can be summarised as follows: x To improve the efficiency of the Public Administration; x To implement interoperability and the full cooperation among administrations; ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 33
  37. 37. x To improve the transparency of public expenditure; x To build-up the digital citizenship; x To adopt a systemic approach for efficiency and quality x To favour competitiveness among enterprises and the development of the ICT industry. (GHPRFUDFThe project foresees a constant involvement of citizens in public decisions, in all possible sectors, for examplein political life, environment, planning department, transport. Many web sites of local public administrationshave opened forums to interact with citizens, involving people and the civil society in environmental and lifequality projects in the cities. These new communication models have improved the relationship between thecitizen-user without subordination but, on the contrary, through a relationship that favours integration and co-operation, where the citizen becomes the main responsible of his/her future. 0*RYHUQPHQWMobile government is the new frontier of services provided by the Public Administration and uses as atechnological platform the infrastructure of mobile operators. Through these new services citizens canimplement a series of operations using, for example, their mobile phone to pay for parking, to be informedabout unemployment lists and about many other opportunities.Among the different services available through mobile phones there are: x Access to clinical records x Communication about late arrivals of public services x Payments of public parking places and of services for the elderly and disabled x Road map services on GPRS. 7KH 0LQLVWU IRU 3XEOLF $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ DQG ,QQRYDWLRQThe Ministry for Public Administration and Innovation has two Departments: 1. Public Administration Department 2. Innovation and Technologies DepartmentThe Innovation and Technologies Department is the structure used by the Minister for the PublicAdministration and Innovation to design and implement development policies of the Information Society, andalso for the interrelated technological innovations for Public Administrations, citizens and enterprises.Its activities are:3XEOLF $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ PRGHUQLVDWLRQ * e-Government – improvement of the P.A. efficiency * e-Government – high impact initiatives,QQRYDWLRQ LQ SULRULW DUHDV * e-Platform for tourism ¨¦B¨A) ¥ ! 9 @%$¤9 ¨ 86 ©¨ ! 5 !¤¨¦4¨1) 12 1) # ¥ ¤¤%¨¤# ¨¥ ! ¦¨¥ ¥ ¨¦¤¢  £ $ © 6 $ ¥ 7 7 ¡ ©§ £ $¥ 3 0 (§¥ ¡ $§ © § ©§¥ £¡ 34
  38. 38. * ICT and digital contents for schools * ICT @ University * National Platform for Health (eHealth) * Initiatives for infomobility * Technological innovation promotion,QQRYDWLRQ RI WKH SURGXFWLYH VVWHP * Actions to facilitate innovative processes and products (SMEs) * Regional Plans to strengthen the competitiveness of the local industryLJLWDO LYLGH 5HGXFWLRQ * ICT use dissemination *to improve access to education and trainingH*RYHUQPHQW DQG ,7 IRU WKH GHYHORSPHQW RI * planning activities and technical cooperation * promotional activities of international partnerships * support activities to governance policies of Information Society 1,3$ 3UHVHQWDWLRQCNIPA (Centro Nazionale per l’Informatica nella Pubblica Amministrazione – National Centre for ICT in thePublic Administrations) works at the Council Presidency for the implementation of policies of the Ministry ofReform and Innovation in Public Administrations. It was created thanks to the unification of two pre-existingbodies: the Autorità per l’informatica nella pubblica amministrazione (the Authority for ICT in publicadministration) and the Centro Tecnico per la R.U.P.A. (Technical Centre for the Single Network of PublicAdministrations). CNIPA was created with the objective of providing support to public administrations for theefficient use of ICT, so they can improve the quality of services and keep a lid on expenditures.CNIPA is headed by a collective body composed of a President and three other components that areappointed by Italy’s Prime Minister. … ¨¦B¨A“ € † !„ e @%¤e ƒ¨„ d˜ ‚¨‡ ! †— !¤¨¦4¨1“ 1• 1“ ‰ € ¤¤%¨¤‰ ¨€ † !„ ‡ ¦¨€ „ € ¨¦¤¢wƒ †„y „ ƒ ‚ † ƒ ˜  € ™ ™ x ‚„„ y € – ” ’€ ‘x „ ˆ„ ƒ ‚ † ƒ„ … ƒ ƒ ‚€ yx 35

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