Digital	  Storytelling	  with	  iMovie	  QuickStart	  Guide	  	                                                    ...
        	         Put	  a	  check	  mark	  in	  “Show	  Advanced	  Tools”	  and	  “Display	  time	  as	         HH:MM:SS:F...
Then	  click	  on	  the	  next	  “Preferences”	  tab,	  “Browser,”	  which	  will	         look	  like	  this:	         	 ...
           	            	         5. Start	  a	  new	  project,	  and	  import	  your	  images.	            	         6. A...
            and	  then	  on	  the	  first	  clip,	  and	  record	  your	  voiceover.	  This	  should	             come	  i...
Some	  helpful	  resources	  on	  the	  web:	  	  Sources	  for	  copyright-­‐friendly	  materials:	  	                   ...
Script Template for a Digital Story                            Courtesy of Dr. Helen Barrett   http://electronicportfolios...
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Quick Start Guide to Digital Storytelling with iMovie 9

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Using only still images to create "traditional" digital stories with iMovie, where the voiceover is scripted in advance. Requires some fiddling with the length of clips, but the result is well worth it.

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Quick Start Guide to Digital Storytelling with iMovie 9

  1. 1.      Digital  Storytelling  with  iMovie  QuickStart  Guide     by  Fred  Mindlin   Associate  Director  for  Technology  Integration   Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/ fmindlin@gmail.com 1. Start  with  the  script:  no  more  than  one  page,  double-­‐spaced  (~400   words,  roughly  four  minutes  when  spoken  aloud).  Using  the  rule  of   thumb  that  about  100  words  take  about  one  minute  to  voice,  you   can  shorten  the  word-­‐length  limit  even  more  to  make  projects   easier  to  manage.   2. Collect  or  create  still  images  to  illustrate  the  story:  require  at  least   twelve  images  for  a  four-­‐minute  story,  or  three  per  minute.  That’s   a  minimum  –  twice  that  many  is  even  better,  so  students  have   more  choice  and  flexibility  if  an  image  doesn’t  work  as  well  as  they   hoped.   3. Storyboard:  use  a  script-­‐focused  storyboard,  rather  than  a  picture-­‐ focused  storyboard,  to  keep  student  voice  foremost  [example  at   end];  have  students  insert  rough  estimates  of  how  long  each   section  will  take  to  read,  and  the  total  for  their  whole  piece   4. Setup  iMovie:  on  first  launching  iMovie,  default  preferences  are   set  to:     1Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  2. 2.     Put  a  check  mark  in  “Show  Advanced  Tools”  and  “Display  time  as   HH:MM:SS:Frames”  so  the  General  Preferences  look  like  this:             2Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  3. 3. Then  click  on  the  next  “Preferences”  tab,  “Browser,”  which  will   look  like  this:         Change  these  settings  to     3Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  4. 4.       5. Start  a  new  project,  and  import  your  images.     6. Arrange  the  images  in  the  order  to  put  them  on  your  Storyboard.     7. Click  on  the  tool  wheel  in  the  first  clip,  and  set  the  length  of  time   it  will  display  to  at  least  one  minute  longer  than  you  estimate   your  entire  script  will  take  to  read.     8. Click  on  the  tool  wheel  in  the  last  clip,  and  again  set  the  length  of   time  it  will  display  to  at  least  one  minute  longer  than  you   estimate  your  entire  script  will  take  to  read.     9. Click  on  the  microphone  symbol       4Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  5. 5.   and  then  on  the  first  clip,  and  record  your  voiceover.  This  should   come  in  as  a  green  or  purple  file  below  the  clip.     10. Now  comes  the  hardest  part:  as  you  playback  your  voiceover,   you’re  going  to  adjust  the  length  of  time  each  clip  displays  so  that   the  transitions  from  one  image  to  the  next  occur  where  you  want   them  to.  Notice  how  there’s  a  pop-­‐up  window  above  the  playhead   that  shows  you  exactly  where  you  are  in  your  piece:        Use  that  info  to  continue  adjusting  your  clip  lengths  to  match  up  with  where  you  are  in  your  voiceover.    The  last  step  will  be  to  reduce  down  again  the  extra-­‐long  timing  you  set  for  the  last  clip.  This  is  left  for  last  so  that  you  never  dip  below  the  total  length  of  your  voiceover  –  iMovie  will  start  cutting  your  voiceover  short  if  the  total  length  of  time  that  the  clips  are  displayed  drops  below  the  total  time  of  the  voiceover.        More  resources  will  be  available  on  the  CCWP  website  as  we  develop  them…     5Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  6. 6. Some  helpful  resources  on  the  web:    Sources  for  copyright-­‐friendly  materials:     http://copyrightfriendly.wikispaces.com/home    40+  Resources  &  Tips  for  digital  storytelling:  http://teacherbootcamp.edublogs.org/2012/02/08/engaging-­‐learners-­‐through-­‐digital-­‐storytelling-­‐40-­‐resources-­‐tips/     6Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/
  7. 7. Script Template for a Digital Story Courtesy of Dr. Helen Barrett http://electronicportfolios.org/digistory/prepdigstory.htmlWho is the audience for my story?What is my dramatic question?Script (what I will read and what participants will hear) Images and name of sound file 7Central California Writing Project http://ccwritingproject.org/

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