IP Issues & Social Media - Look Before You Tweet

1,314 views

Published on

This presentation details Intellectual Property Issues that surround social media. It highlights some of the key trade-mark policies behind Twitter including Twitters trade-mark criteria, impersonation policy as well as how to protect your trade-mark.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,314
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

IP Issues & Social Media - Look Before You Tweet

  1. 1. IT‐CAN FRASER MILNER CASGRAIN LLP OCTOBER 6, 2010 IP ISSUES AND SOCIAL MEDIA: LOOK BEFORE YOU TWEETPresented by:Rob McDonaldPartner, Co-chair FMCNational IP Group 1
  2. 2. TOP TEN TWITTER BRANDS(Sample during a three day period in April 2009)1. Starbucks 3.37 millions mentions2. Google, 1.01 million mentions3. BBC, 703,000 mentions4. Apple, 512,000 mentions5. AIG, 455,000 mentions6. Amazon, 245,000 mentions7. Microsoft, 221,000 mentions8. The Guardian, 211,000 mentions9. Dell, 185,000 mentions10. Coca Cola, 135,000 mentionsNote: ‐ Dell generated 1 million dollars by alerting Twitter followers to sale items over the Christmas break. ‐ Many businesses offer exclusive discounts to Twitter followers ‐ Recent studies suggest only 2% of all companies use Twitter and that only 7 of the top 100 brands names are  registered as a Twitter I.D. 2
  3. 3. TOP TEN TWITTER ACCOUNTS Followers1. Lady Gaga 6,634,1982. Britney Spears 6,088,7103. Ashton Kucher 5,890,3214. Justin Bieber 5,591,9625. Barack Obama 5,586,3156. Ellen DeGeneres 5,316,4117. Kim Kardashian 5,002,0668. Oprah Winfrey 4,362,6299. Taylor Swift 4,358,65210.Katy Perry 4,148,441 3
  4. 4. TWITTER SQUATTING  (User Name Squatting)• Like domain name cyber‐squatting was in the 1990’s, appropriation of  proprietary user names on social networking sites is problematic;• User name registration is free;• Multiple registrations are possible;• User name for sale accounts are prohibited;• CNN/James Cox example;• Social networking sites have internal IP and trade‐mark policies, but no  user name equivalent of the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution  Policy (UDRP) exists; 4
  5. 5. • User name squatting is prohibited by the Twitter Rules.• “Please note that if an account has had no updates, no profile  image, and there is no intent to mislead, it typically means  there is no name‐squatting or impersonation.  Note that we  will not release inactive or squatted user names except in  cases of trade‐mark infringement.”• “Attempts to sell, buy or solicit other forms of payment in  exchange for user names are also violations and may result in  permanent account suspension”. 5
  6. 6. • “Name  squatting  and  “user  name  for  sale” accounts  will  be  permanently  suspended.    Attempts  to  sell  or  extort  other  forms  of  payment  in  exchange  for  user  names  will  result  in  account suspension.  Accounts that are inactive for more than  six months may be revoked without further notice.” 6
  7. 7. TWITTER TRADE‐MARK POLICY• “Using a company or business name, logo or other trade‐mark  protected materials in a manner that may mislead or confuse  others or be used for financial gain, may be considered trade‐ mark  infringement.    Accounts  with  clear  INTENT  to  mislead  others  will  be  immediately  suspended;  even  if  there  is  no  trade‐mark  infringement,  attempts  to  mislead  others  are  tantamount to business impersonation.” 7
  8. 8. TWITTER IMPERSONATION POLICY• “Impersonation is pretending to be another person or entity in  order to deceive.  Impersonation is a violation of the Twitter  Rules and may result in permanent account suspension.”• “Twitter users are allowed to create parody, commentary or  fan accounts.  Accounts with the clear intent to confuse or  mislead may be permanently suspended.” 8
  9. 9. TWITTER CRITERIATwitter will consider the following factors in determining  whether name squatting has occurred:1) The number of accounts created;2) Creating accounts for the purpose of preventing others from  using those account names;3) Creating accounts for the purpose of selling those accounts;4) Using feeds of third party content to update and maintain  accounts under the names of those third parties. 9
  10. 10. HOW TO PROTECT YOUR TRADE‐MARK• Register corporate names, trade names, trade‐marks and  brand names with each social networking site;• Register permutations and combinations of trade‐marks as  user names;• Review the terms of use of every site and understand rights  and obligations;• Ensure compliance with terms of use by employees and  licensees; 10
  11. 11. • Develop and implement internal policies regarding use and ownership of  user names by employees and key personnel;• Monitor social networking sites to determine if the trade‐marks are being  used inappropriately;• Report infringements and improper uses, including “user name squatting” to social networking sites;• Restrict employee use of social networking sites to prevent disclosure of  confidential or sensitive corporate information, dilution of brand, and  potential defamation and depreciation of goodwill claims; 11
  12. 12. COPYRIGHT VIOLATIONS ON SOCIAL  NETWORKING SITES• Unauthorized reproduction of copyright work on a social  networking site is copyright infringement unless it falls under  specific exception or if a substantial reproduction has not been made;• The party posting the copyright work is liable for infringement;• The social networking site may be liable for infringement if  they “authorized” the infringement; 12
  13. 13. • Most sites have “notice and take down” provisions to limit  liability as a service provider;• Implement internal policies and employment agreements to  prohibit posting of third party copyright material and to define ownership of content;• Ownership of user‐• created content is a significant issue. 13
  14. 14. QUESTIONS?Rob McDonald780 423 7305Rob.McDonald@fmc-law.comLinkedIn
  15. 15. The preceding presentation contains examples of the kinds of issues companies looking to increase their activity in social media could face. If you are faced with one of these issues, please retain professional assistance as each situation is unique.

×