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Individual Differences
   Student Profile
   [Type the document subtitle]
              Laura Flores
               5/3/2012
IDSP 2


                              Individual Differences Student Profile

       I have always been afraid of helping exceptional students with disabilities. I was afraid

that I may be hurting the students instead of helping them, or plain simple not know how to teach

the students. When I went through my observation I saw that helping exceptional students with

disabilities was nothing like what I thought it would be. Working with Wolfe, I have gain

confidence in working with other exceptional students. I have observed Wolfe for 16 hours, and

have gathered data to write up a profile on him. This profile I included Wolfe’s general

information, physical development, cognitive development, and socio-emotional development

and have indicated in what areas are his strengths and weakness.

General Information

       The student’s first name is Wolfegang, male, Caucasian. His parents, peers, and teacher

call him Wolfe. He is 10 years old and is fourth grade. He is currently on an Individual

Education Program (IEP). He is a non verbal exceptional student. In his family there are 4

children, and two adults.

       Wolfe has 3 siblings. He is the oldest of the family. Wolfe’s brother in 1st grade has a

sister in kindergarten, and one baby sister who is under a year old. He lives with both mom and

dad. Grandpa seems to be well involved and supportive in the family. I am not sure where the

father works, but his mom is a stay at home mom.

       Wolfe’s elementary school has for the most part a typical school schedule. On

Wednesdays the school has a “late start” where the school starts at 9:30 AM instead of 9 AM.

The school has a zero tolerance for bullying. Wolfe’s spend most his time in the extended

recourse room (ERR) to receive special education according to his IEP. He has an aid that is

always with him. It is not always the same aid, but he is never left alone. Even at recess he has an
IDSP 3


aid who watches him, and maybe other student. Wolfe is partial inclusion with general education

class. He is stays in his general education classroom right after lunch recess where he joins his

classroom for “Read out load.” The general education teacher reads to the class. He also stays

with his class when they go to any specials (P.E. Music, Computer, or Library), or if the class is

working on an art project. When the activity is over he walked down to the ERR. Wolfe rides

the bus to school and back home. He is only dropped off on Fridays. Every morning when he

arrives as school to school he has sensory session, and after lunch recess he has other sensory

session but the aid ties in math into the session. On Fridays, Wolfe does not arrive to school until

10 AM because he has occupational therapy (OT).

Physical Development

       Wolfe has dirty bold hair, blue eyes, is about 4 ft and 8 in. His skin color is ivory, and has

no birth marks that I have seen. Physical maturation compared with his peers who are same age

are the same. He has no physical disabilities. He looks like any average 10 year old boy. He

writes with his right hand.

       Wolfe’s general physical health is that he has good vision, hearing, and no chronic health

problems. He does however have a language disorder. He is not able to speak as well his peers.

When he gets mad or upset he is not able to speak, so squeals very loud. The assistive technology

device that he owns is an ipad that his parents provide for him. Sometimes, he will bring up a

picture of fried chicken which indicates that he is hungry. I believe that he has both a pragmatics

disorder and semantics disorder.

       Wolfe’s fitness includes his P.E special, he walks 15 minutes after lunch recess, but does

not actually play at recess. Walking for 15 minutes is something the school does together. His

large and small muscle development is normal compared to other peers his age. He has a couple
IDSP 4


spots where he sits or lays down. Sometimes, when he is out his normal playground he sits on a

rolling ball that attached to parts, or he lies down on the grass beside a fire hydrant. Many

students come up and speak to Wolfe, but he only repeats back what they said to him. I believe

that he is capable of playing, but does not find it interesting. He is able to hold a pencil, markers,

to write or draw.

       Wolfe’s nutrition is consists of many snacks throughout the day. In many ways food is

used a positive reinforcement to get his work done. At lunch, he will not eat most of it. He is a

very picky eater, and does not like messy foods. He more likes to eat finger foods for example:

chicken nuggets, and fries. The aids always place out snacks for him when he gets some of his

work done. His snacks arrange from Fritos, Gold Fishes, pretzels, and popcorn. Every two weeks

his ERR class does a life skill cooking project. Where he or one his peers measure out

ingredients, stir, cook, or bake food.

Cognitive Development

       Wolfe’s Academic/school history is that he was placed in the special education in

kindergarten. His week weakness is in Speech, forming verbal or written sentences. Some of his

strengths are math, reading, and spelling. Since his weakness is speech, Wolfe has an alternative

communication that is used with his ipad.

       Some of the behaviors Wolfe demonstrates are autism behaviors. He is not able to focus

very long. When his general education teacher reads out load they made an accommodation for

Wolfe to have Silly Putty with beads, so that he can stay in his seat. When doing his work the

motivation that he has is that he knows that he gets a snack when he is done with the work.

       According to Jean Piaget Wolfe is in the Preoperational stage and the Concrete

Operational stage (Baker, 2011). Wolfe has not fully acquired language since he is not able to
IDSP 5


speak. However, he has many skills in the Operational stage for example: he can order things by

sizes, understand family math numbers, but I am not sure if he could tell that a short wide cup

can hold the same amount of liquid in a tall thin cup. Language skills Wolfe is able to read, and

say the words, but not able to say sentence on his own. He gets frustrated when teachers don’t

know what he wants or needs. He points at pictures that are on his binder that have food, a clock

that is broken in two, or cup of water. That represent that he is hungry, needs or break, or that he

is thirsty. The teachers try to prompt him to say the sentence on his own, but he only represents

what is being said.

Socio-emotional Development

       Wolfe’s interaction with peers seems to be only a one way connection. He doesn’t ever

go up to other students. Many other students have gone and talked to Wolfe, but really don’t get

a responds back but what they just said to him. None of the students pick on or bully him. The

interaction with adults, he does the same thing. Only that the follows direction, and does he

school work for the adults. I am not sure where his self concept and self-esteem level are at. I

assume that he his self-esteem is normal. Wolfe does not seem to have a negative attitude

towards his own self.

       According to Eric Erikson the stage of socio-emotional development Wolfe is at the

Industry Versus Inferiority (competence) stage and learning Initiative Verse Guilt (purpose)

stage (Socio-emotional development, 2012). Wolfe is not able to relate himself with peers

according to rules, progressive free play according to the Industry Versus Inferiority. Wolfe doe

not broaden his skills through active play, or cooperate with others.

Summary
IDSP 6


       My major findings are exceptional students are not as difficult as I thought it would be.

Wolfe is non-verbal, with intellectual disabilities. Working in the ERR is something I would like

to get more experience in. I like how most of the time Wolfe got more one on one time with the

teachers. Wolfe is at typical level in the general and physical domain. He has a normal school

schedule like any other students except for Fridays he comes to school late. He has a typical

family that he lives in with his sister, brothers, and mom and dad. In both the Cognitive and

Socio-emotional he is not at a typical level. For cognitive, he was placed in the ERR. Even with

the other exceptional students he was the one that is in the ERR the most. The other students

spend more time in their general education class. Wolfe is also the only one that doesn’t speak

fluently like the other students or exceptional students. For the Socio-emotional Wolfe should be

in the Concrete Operational Stage according to Piaget, and in the Industry Versus Inferiority

(competence) according to Erikson. I don’t think Wolfe is able to see things at a different view

point or be able to work as a team.

       Some of Wolfe’s strengths are math and reading. His need is he needs to find a way to

communicate with his peers and teachers. I think if he learned American Sign Language (ASL) it

would help communicate sine he is not able to form his own verbal sentences. With ASL this

can take away the frustration of when he tries to get his need across to the teacher or aid. Wolfe

could have more time to learn than the teacher try figure out what Wolfe wants or needs.

       What specific strategies that would help Wolfe support his learning and development are

universal intervention with peers in his general education classroom. I think he needs to be

exposed more to his peers. I feel like keeping him always in his the ERR hinders some his

development and relationships with other students. Since he doesn’t get to know them during
IDSP 7


class, only at certain times, and activities. Overall, Wolfe is in great elementary school that has

the resources that he acquires for developing exceptional student.
IDSP 8


                                        Bibliography
Baker, M. (2011, December 15). Chart of Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development. Retrieved

       April 17, 2012, from Useful Charts: http://www.usefulcharts.com/psychology/piaget-

       stages-of-cognitive-development.html

Stages of Social-Emotional Development. (2012). Retrieved April 17, 2012, from Child

       Development Institute Parenting Today: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child-

       development/erickson.shtml

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Did

  • 1. Individual Differences Student Profile [Type the document subtitle] Laura Flores 5/3/2012
  • 2. IDSP 2 Individual Differences Student Profile I have always been afraid of helping exceptional students with disabilities. I was afraid that I may be hurting the students instead of helping them, or plain simple not know how to teach the students. When I went through my observation I saw that helping exceptional students with disabilities was nothing like what I thought it would be. Working with Wolfe, I have gain confidence in working with other exceptional students. I have observed Wolfe for 16 hours, and have gathered data to write up a profile on him. This profile I included Wolfe’s general information, physical development, cognitive development, and socio-emotional development and have indicated in what areas are his strengths and weakness. General Information The student’s first name is Wolfegang, male, Caucasian. His parents, peers, and teacher call him Wolfe. He is 10 years old and is fourth grade. He is currently on an Individual Education Program (IEP). He is a non verbal exceptional student. In his family there are 4 children, and two adults. Wolfe has 3 siblings. He is the oldest of the family. Wolfe’s brother in 1st grade has a sister in kindergarten, and one baby sister who is under a year old. He lives with both mom and dad. Grandpa seems to be well involved and supportive in the family. I am not sure where the father works, but his mom is a stay at home mom. Wolfe’s elementary school has for the most part a typical school schedule. On Wednesdays the school has a “late start” where the school starts at 9:30 AM instead of 9 AM. The school has a zero tolerance for bullying. Wolfe’s spend most his time in the extended recourse room (ERR) to receive special education according to his IEP. He has an aid that is always with him. It is not always the same aid, but he is never left alone. Even at recess he has an
  • 3. IDSP 3 aid who watches him, and maybe other student. Wolfe is partial inclusion with general education class. He is stays in his general education classroom right after lunch recess where he joins his classroom for “Read out load.” The general education teacher reads to the class. He also stays with his class when they go to any specials (P.E. Music, Computer, or Library), or if the class is working on an art project. When the activity is over he walked down to the ERR. Wolfe rides the bus to school and back home. He is only dropped off on Fridays. Every morning when he arrives as school to school he has sensory session, and after lunch recess he has other sensory session but the aid ties in math into the session. On Fridays, Wolfe does not arrive to school until 10 AM because he has occupational therapy (OT). Physical Development Wolfe has dirty bold hair, blue eyes, is about 4 ft and 8 in. His skin color is ivory, and has no birth marks that I have seen. Physical maturation compared with his peers who are same age are the same. He has no physical disabilities. He looks like any average 10 year old boy. He writes with his right hand. Wolfe’s general physical health is that he has good vision, hearing, and no chronic health problems. He does however have a language disorder. He is not able to speak as well his peers. When he gets mad or upset he is not able to speak, so squeals very loud. The assistive technology device that he owns is an ipad that his parents provide for him. Sometimes, he will bring up a picture of fried chicken which indicates that he is hungry. I believe that he has both a pragmatics disorder and semantics disorder. Wolfe’s fitness includes his P.E special, he walks 15 minutes after lunch recess, but does not actually play at recess. Walking for 15 minutes is something the school does together. His large and small muscle development is normal compared to other peers his age. He has a couple
  • 4. IDSP 4 spots where he sits or lays down. Sometimes, when he is out his normal playground he sits on a rolling ball that attached to parts, or he lies down on the grass beside a fire hydrant. Many students come up and speak to Wolfe, but he only repeats back what they said to him. I believe that he is capable of playing, but does not find it interesting. He is able to hold a pencil, markers, to write or draw. Wolfe’s nutrition is consists of many snacks throughout the day. In many ways food is used a positive reinforcement to get his work done. At lunch, he will not eat most of it. He is a very picky eater, and does not like messy foods. He more likes to eat finger foods for example: chicken nuggets, and fries. The aids always place out snacks for him when he gets some of his work done. His snacks arrange from Fritos, Gold Fishes, pretzels, and popcorn. Every two weeks his ERR class does a life skill cooking project. Where he or one his peers measure out ingredients, stir, cook, or bake food. Cognitive Development Wolfe’s Academic/school history is that he was placed in the special education in kindergarten. His week weakness is in Speech, forming verbal or written sentences. Some of his strengths are math, reading, and spelling. Since his weakness is speech, Wolfe has an alternative communication that is used with his ipad. Some of the behaviors Wolfe demonstrates are autism behaviors. He is not able to focus very long. When his general education teacher reads out load they made an accommodation for Wolfe to have Silly Putty with beads, so that he can stay in his seat. When doing his work the motivation that he has is that he knows that he gets a snack when he is done with the work. According to Jean Piaget Wolfe is in the Preoperational stage and the Concrete Operational stage (Baker, 2011). Wolfe has not fully acquired language since he is not able to
  • 5. IDSP 5 speak. However, he has many skills in the Operational stage for example: he can order things by sizes, understand family math numbers, but I am not sure if he could tell that a short wide cup can hold the same amount of liquid in a tall thin cup. Language skills Wolfe is able to read, and say the words, but not able to say sentence on his own. He gets frustrated when teachers don’t know what he wants or needs. He points at pictures that are on his binder that have food, a clock that is broken in two, or cup of water. That represent that he is hungry, needs or break, or that he is thirsty. The teachers try to prompt him to say the sentence on his own, but he only represents what is being said. Socio-emotional Development Wolfe’s interaction with peers seems to be only a one way connection. He doesn’t ever go up to other students. Many other students have gone and talked to Wolfe, but really don’t get a responds back but what they just said to him. None of the students pick on or bully him. The interaction with adults, he does the same thing. Only that the follows direction, and does he school work for the adults. I am not sure where his self concept and self-esteem level are at. I assume that he his self-esteem is normal. Wolfe does not seem to have a negative attitude towards his own self. According to Eric Erikson the stage of socio-emotional development Wolfe is at the Industry Versus Inferiority (competence) stage and learning Initiative Verse Guilt (purpose) stage (Socio-emotional development, 2012). Wolfe is not able to relate himself with peers according to rules, progressive free play according to the Industry Versus Inferiority. Wolfe doe not broaden his skills through active play, or cooperate with others. Summary
  • 6. IDSP 6 My major findings are exceptional students are not as difficult as I thought it would be. Wolfe is non-verbal, with intellectual disabilities. Working in the ERR is something I would like to get more experience in. I like how most of the time Wolfe got more one on one time with the teachers. Wolfe is at typical level in the general and physical domain. He has a normal school schedule like any other students except for Fridays he comes to school late. He has a typical family that he lives in with his sister, brothers, and mom and dad. In both the Cognitive and Socio-emotional he is not at a typical level. For cognitive, he was placed in the ERR. Even with the other exceptional students he was the one that is in the ERR the most. The other students spend more time in their general education class. Wolfe is also the only one that doesn’t speak fluently like the other students or exceptional students. For the Socio-emotional Wolfe should be in the Concrete Operational Stage according to Piaget, and in the Industry Versus Inferiority (competence) according to Erikson. I don’t think Wolfe is able to see things at a different view point or be able to work as a team. Some of Wolfe’s strengths are math and reading. His need is he needs to find a way to communicate with his peers and teachers. I think if he learned American Sign Language (ASL) it would help communicate sine he is not able to form his own verbal sentences. With ASL this can take away the frustration of when he tries to get his need across to the teacher or aid. Wolfe could have more time to learn than the teacher try figure out what Wolfe wants or needs. What specific strategies that would help Wolfe support his learning and development are universal intervention with peers in his general education classroom. I think he needs to be exposed more to his peers. I feel like keeping him always in his the ERR hinders some his development and relationships with other students. Since he doesn’t get to know them during
  • 7. IDSP 7 class, only at certain times, and activities. Overall, Wolfe is in great elementary school that has the resources that he acquires for developing exceptional student.
  • 8. IDSP 8 Bibliography Baker, M. (2011, December 15). Chart of Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development. Retrieved April 17, 2012, from Useful Charts: http://www.usefulcharts.com/psychology/piaget- stages-of-cognitive-development.html Stages of Social-Emotional Development. (2012). Retrieved April 17, 2012, from Child Development Institute Parenting Today: http://childdevelopmentinfo.com/child- development/erickson.shtml