Buzz On Bees Lesson Plan

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Honey bee education program, lessons for grades K-5

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Buzz On Bees Lesson Plan

  1. 1. TAble of ContentsWhat’s the buzz on beesIntroductionA: Lesson A What are honey bees and why are they important? Activities: Know - Want - Learn, Word Match, Word Search - More than honey!, What do bees do?, How bees grow?B: Lesson B How do bees make honey? What’s inside a honey bee, a hive and a flower? Activities: Know - Want - Learn, Word Match, Bee Maze, Identify Bee Parts, The Power of a Flower (advanced ver- sion), The Power of a Flower (simple version), Activation PollinationC: Lesson C The Busy Beekeeper Activities: Know - Want - Learn, Word Match, Crossword Puzzle, Bee MazeD: Lesson D Africanized Honey Bees “Bee” Aware of Your Environment ... Look, Listen and Run. Activities: Know - What - Learn, Where Bees Might Be, Compare and Contrast, Word Match, Letter to Parent or GuardianE: Bonus Activities Identify Bee Parts Inside and Out Bissy Bee Trivia Help Bissy and Grizelda Figure Out Their Differences (Math Activity) Create a Bee (Art Activity)F: Appendices Glossary Additional Teacher Resources Information Sources Activity Answer Sheets What’s the Buzz on Bees i FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  2. 2. IntroductionWhat’s the Buzz on Bees?My name is Bissy Bee. Welcome to the first edition of What’s the Buzz on Bees, preparedby me and the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services’ Division of Plant Industry.In this day and age, many adults, let alone children, do not know the source of their food. They think it justappears in the grocery store. They sadly have lost the connection with the plants and animals that provide thefood on our tables. The honey bee is a critical link in the chain of how fruits, nuts and vegetables are produced.Not to brag, but the insect world is fascinating, and children seem to be particularly intrigued by it. Theselessons on the honey bee should provide entertaining education to your classes.The following four lessons are designed to help you teach students in grades K-5 many interesting facts abouthoney bees including:Lesson A: What are honey bees and why are they so important?Students will learn what a honey bee is, the social structure of honey bees and their role in the hive, and aboutthe behavior of insects that are similar to honey bees.Lesson B: How do honey bees make honey? What’s inside ahoney bee, a hive, and a flower?Students will learn what pollination is, how bees behave, how beehives areconstructed, what products are found inside the hive, the parts of a honey bee,and the parts of a flower.Lesson C: What keeps a beekeeper busy?Students will learn the difference between feral and managed beecolonies, the basic structure of a beehive, what beekeepers do andthe equipment they use, and how beehives are moved around to helppollinate crops.Lesson D: what are Africanized honey bees, and whyshould You, “Bee Aware,Look, Listen, and Run”?Students will learn the importance of managed honey bees, how todescribe the differences between Africanized andEuropean honey bees, how to prevent Africanizedbees from establishing nests in and around theirhomes and schools, how to prevent potentialstinging incidents, and what to do if they areattacked by bees or other stinging insects. What’s the Buzz on Bees ii FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  3. 3. IntroductionEach of the four lessons provides the following:Overview – Bissy Bee provides detailed information on each lesson’s topic. This information should be read by theteacher to the class. A vocabulary list is provided with each lesson and is intended to be given to students prior to thelesson, so they can refer to it while the teacher is reading the overview.Activity Sheets – Exercises are included with each lesson to be performed by the students with direction from theteacher.Sunshine State Standards – Outlines how each lesson fulfills the goals of the Sunshine State Standards.Objectives – Lists what the students will learn in each of the lessons.Vocabulary – Every vocabulary word has been highlighted in the text (first use only) and defined in the glossary.Artwork and Graphic Design – All the illustrations are original artwork by DPI employee Kathryn Shepard. Thelayout of the lessons was done by DPI graphic artist Scott Burton. Writing was done by Kathryn Shepard,Denise Feiber and Ellen Dyck. Oh yes, and of course, Bissy Bee had a lot to do with every aspect of the lessons.For more information, contact Denise Feiber, APR, Public Information Director, Florida Department of Agriculture &Consumer Services Division of Plant Industry. 352/372-3505 x102 feiberd@doacs.state.fl.us end of Introduction I-1 What’s the Buzz on Bees iii FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  4. 4. Lesson A What are honey bees andwhy are they so important?
  5. 5. LESSON A:What are Honey BeesOVERVIEW: Hi, I’m Bissy Bee. Do you Insects have been around for know what a honey bee is? many years. In fact, honey bees Do you know have been in existence for over 40 what one million years. However, the honey looks bees that we know are not native like? Well to the United States. They were for starters, brought over by European settlers honey bees are in the early 1600’s to produceBissy Bee small animals that honey and beeswax which were are part of a class used in everyday Spanish life.called insects. Insects have similar Since then, honey bees have Sunshine Statecharacteristics or traits. Many, like successfully spread throughoutthe honey bee, have two pairs the world. Standards:of wings, three pairs of legs, and Students will:a body that is divided into three Honey bees are very important. Know that the size of a popu-parts. Why do you think they are so lation is dependent upon the available resources within its Head important? Honey bees are the community. strongest link in the chain between Read the text and determine the people who grow the food the main idea or essential and the people who eat the food. message, identify relevant sup- porting details and facts, and Thorax Without honey bee pollination, arrange events in chronological the food we eat could decrease by order. 1/3rd. Foods such as watermelons, Know the way that plants, ani- Abdomen cucumbers, squash, blueberries mals, and protists interact. and strawberries, as well as manyThey have a head, a thorax (which others fruits, vegetables and nuts, Objectives:is the middle part of their body) are all pollinated by honey bees. Students will learn:and an abdomen. Some other In addition to pollinating crops, What a honey bee is and char-examples of insects are flies, the honey produced by Florida acteristics of all insectscrickets, mosquitoes, beetles, and honey bees is some of the best in The social structure of honeybutterflies. Honey bees also have the nation. Honey bees contribute bees and their roles in the hiveshort hairs on their bodies and their millions of dollars to Florida’s About the behavior of insectslegs, and they are orange-brown economy each year. that look similar to beesto almost black in color. Thereare approximately 20 to 30 million Vocabulary:species of insects in the world and Honey bee Dronecurrently scientists have identified Insect Pollen basketsaround 920,000. And with each Thorax Nectarpassing year about 2,000 new Abdomen Proboscis Pollination Compound eyesinsects are identified. Colony Fertilized Hive Larva Queen Pupa Worker Solitary What’s the Buzz on Bees A-1 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  6. 6. LESSON A: Honey bees are social insects. Do hairs on their hind legs which form what we call you know what social insects are? They pollen baskets. The pollen baskets allow the are insects that like to live in large groups; workers to collect pollen from the flowers they these large groups of honey bees are visit. Worker bees also have long proboscises. called colonies. A single colony will have A proboscis is a long straw-like tool that bees anywhere from 40,000 to 60,000 bees. use to suck nectar from inside flowers. Nectar is With so many bees in each colony, it is what bees use to make honey. As you can see, important that different jobs are given to workers are very busy bees. They are responsi- different bees, and that each bee knows ble for raising and feeding the young, collecting what it should be doing. Organization is im- and storing food, making honey and beeswax, portant because the success of the colony and protecting the hive. depends on how well the bees perform their jobs. The final bee that is found in the hive is the drone. To function well as a group, the entire Drones are larger than colony must work as a team for the good of workers and have rounded the hive. Do you know what a hive is? A abdomens, huge com- hive is the bee’s nest or home where eggs pound eyes, and power- are laid and honey is stored. ful wings. Drones are the male honey bees in the hive and Drone Within the hive, there they serve one purpose, to mate are three types of with the queen bee, but not all drones mate. bees: the queen, Drones that do mate, die; drones that do not workers, and mate are kicked out of the hive by the worker drones. Each has its bees. The worker bees do this in order to con- own particular pur- serve the food supply. Unfortunately for drones, pose in the hive. In a they lack the essentials to survive. hive there is only one queen. The Queen queen, as well as worker bees, Do you know how a bee becomes a bee? have stingers which they will use to defend The queen lays thousands of eggs - some their territory. The queen is able to sting fertilized and some not. Fertilized eggs develop multiple times; while worker bees can only into either queens or workers, while unfertilized sting once. Drones do not have stingers. eggs develop into drones. The process goes The queen is the largest bee in the hive, something like this: the queen bee lays an egg with a longer abdomen and a shiny tho- in the honeycomb of a beehive. In three days, rax. She keeps the colony going by laying the egg hatches into a larva. Worker bees feed as many eggs as possible. A productive the larva, and the larva spins a cocoon around queen will lay as many as 2,000 eggs in a itself. In about ten days, the larva turns into a single day. pupa. It now has eyes, wings, and legs. It looks more like a bee. In another couple of weeks, The worker bees make up the bee is full grown. Finally, the bee chews its the largest portion of the way out of the honeycomb cell and becomes an hive, although they are adult. Time frames for hatching depend on what the smallest bees in the type of bee is being formed. hive. They are all female and as previously mentioned, worker There are several insects that look like the bees have stingers; however, Worker honey bee and may be similar in color and size, they can only sting once and then but their behaviors and characteristics are quite they die. This is because when they sting, different. Some of these insects include yellow some of their internal organs are pulled jackets, paper wasps, bumblebees, horse and out along with the stinger. Unlike the other deer flies, and carpenter bees. bees in the hive, worker bees have stiff What’s the Buzz on Bees A-2 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  7. 7. LESSON A:Though named bees, carpenter bees andbumblebees lead different lives from honeybees. The bumblebee lives in a colony that isvery small and has only about four hundredbees, while the carpenter bee lives a solitarylife. They are also both larger and have morehair than the honey bee. Horse flies and deerflies are different because they do not drinknectar, instead they drink blood from farmanimals and humans, like mosquitoes do.Hornets and wasps behave differently - somedrink nectar like the honey bee, while otherseat bugs. Some live in large colonies and somelive alone. They can sting multiple times, andare often much more aggressive than the honeybee.It is important to understand and respect honeybees as well as all insects. It’s best to leaveinsects alone to do their jobs - this way, you canavoid the possibility of getting bitten or stung.But as long as no bees are around, never resistthe chance to smell the flowers! end of Lesson A What’s the Buzz on Bees A-3 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  8. 8. Lesson AVocabularyab· do· men: (noun) - the hind portion of the body behind the thorax in an arthropodcol· o· ny: (noun) - a group of plants or animals that belong to one species (as of a colony of bees)com· pound eye: - one of two large eyes on the sides of a bee’s head, which allows the bee to tell the difference betweenbrightness and darkness, movement and colordrone: (noun) - male bee whose sole purpose is to mate with the queen beefer· til· ize: (verb) - to make fertile: as a: to cause the fertilization of; also : to unite with in the process of fertilization <asperm fertilizes an egg>hive: (noun) - a container for housing honey bees b: the usually aboveground nest of bees c: a colony of beeshon· ey· bee: (noun) - a bee that produces honey and lives in colonies; especially: a European bee widely kept in hives forthe honey it producesin· sect: (noun) - any of a class of arthropods (as butterflies, true bugs, two-winged flies, bees, and grasshoppers) with thebody clearly divided into a head, thorax, and abdomen, with three pairs of jointed legs, and usually with one or two pairs ofwingslar· va: (noun) - a young wingless often wormlike form (as a grub or caterpillar) that hatches from the egg of many insectsnec· tar: (noun) - a sweet liquid given off by plants and especially by flowers and used by bees in making honeypollen basket: (noun) - a flat or hollow area bordered with stiff hairs on the hind leg of a bee in which it carries pollen to thehive or nestpol· li· na· tion: (noun) - transfer of pollen from the anther to the stigma; important step in the development of seedplantspro· bos· cis: (noun) - a long tube-shaped body part (as the sucking organ of a butterfly) in the mouth region of aninvertebratepu· pa: (noun) - a stage of an insect (as a bee, moth, or beetle) having complete metamorphosis that occurs between thelarva and the adult, is usually enclosed in a cocoon or case, and goes through changes inside by which structures of thelarva are replaced by those of the adultqueen: (noun) - the fertile fully developed female of social bees, ants, and termites whose purpose is to lay eggssol· i· tary: (adjective) - growing or living alone: not forming part of a group or clustertho· rax: (noun) - the middle of the three main divisions of the body of an insectwork· er: (noun) - female member of a colony of honey bees that performs most of the work and protects the colony What’s the Buzz on Bees A FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  9. 9. LESSON A: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Know - Want - LearnKnow – Want – Learn (KWL)KWL is a teaching technique created by Ogle (1986) to develop independent learning.Please complete the first two columns “K and W” before the lesson and then completecolumn “L” after the lesson. K – list what you know about bees W – list what you want to know about bees L – list what you learned about bees K W L What I know What I want to know What I learned What’s the Buzz on Bees A FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  10. 10. LESSON A: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Word Match Match the vocabulary words with the definitions below. a. honey bee i. queen bee b. insects j. worker bee c. thorax k. drone d. abdomen l. pollen baskets e. pollination m. proboscises f. colony n. compound eye g. solitary h. hive____ to transfer pollen from the anther to the stigma of a flower; important step in the development of seed plants____ the middle of the three main divisions of the body of an insect____ a container for housing honey bees____ the female honey bee whose purpose is to lay eggs____ a bee that produces honey and lives in colonies____ an eye (as of an insect) made up of many separate visual units____ a population of plants or animals in a particular place that belong to one species____ any of a class of arthropods (as butterflies, true bugs, two-winged flies, bees, and grasshoppers) with the body clearly divided into a head, thorax, and abdomen, with three pairs of jointed legs, and usually with one or two pairs of wings____ one of the members of a colony of bees that performs most of the labor and protective duties of the colony____ the hind portion of the body behind the thorax in an arthropod____ a flat or hollow area bordered with stiff hairs on the hind leg of a bee in which it carries pollen to the hive or nest____ a male bee (as of the honey bee) that does not have a stinger and gathers no honey____ growing or living alone: not forming part of a group or cluster____ a long tube-shaped body part (as the sucking organ of a butterfly) in the mouth region of an invertebrate What’s the Buzz on Bees A FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  11. 11. LESSON A: Name:_________________________ Date:____________What do Bees Do?The queen, workers and drones look very different and have different jobs in the hive.Identify each bee (queen, worker or drone) in the blank below and then list their jobs. What’s the Buzz on Bees A FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  12. 12. More than Honey! Now you know more about honey bees and why they are important. LESSON A: Find and circle the vocabulary words hidden within the bee.What’s the Buzz on BeesA Abdomen Drones Insects Pollinate Solitary Colonies Hive Organization Proboscis Thorax Compound Eyes Honey bee Pollen baskets Queen WorkersFDACS - Division of Plant Industry Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Created with Puzzlemaker on DiscoverSchool.com
  13. 13. LESSON A: Name:_________________________ Date:____________How Bees GrowPut the bee life stage illustrations in order using 1-5 and then place that number in theblank by the corresponding description below. Bee Life Cycle ___ Adult bee emerges from its cell ___ Worker feeds hatched larva ___ Larva becomes pupa ___ Queen lays egg in wax cell ___ Larva reaches full growth and cells are capped over What’s the Buzz on Bees A FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  14. 14. Lesson BHow do honey bees make honey? What’s inside a honey bee, a hive and a flower?
  15. 15. LESSON B: What’s Inside a HOney Bee, a hive and a flower? OVERVIEW: Hi, Bissy Bee here. a favorite scent of flower and will What do you think continue to search for that kind ofBissy Bee about when some- flower. The nectar that bees collect one mentions from flowers is what gives honey honey bees? A jar of honey, its different colors and flavors. So maybe. Well, let’s learn just the nectar from orange blos- how bees make honey. soms will produce honey that tastes different and is a differ- Honey has been enjoyed by ent color than honey produced people around the world for from sweet clover. thousands of years. Honey is Do you know how much hon- Sunshine State made when nectar, a sweet ey the average worker bee Standards: liquid produced by flower- makes in her lifetime? She Students will: Know that the size of a popu- ing plants, is collected and makes 1/12 of a teaspoon of lation is dependent upon the later transformed into honey by the honey - about the same amount as available resources within its community. bees. Honey bees are the only in- one or two teardrops. How many Read the text and determine the main idea or essential sects that produce food for people. flowers do you think bees must message, identify How many of you enjoy honey? visit to make a whole pound of relevant supporting details and facts, and arrange events in How do you use it? honey? They would have to visit chronological order. approximately two million flowers to Know the way that plants, ani- mals, and protists interact. Also, have you ever heard of the make that much honey. saying “busy as a bee?” Let’s Objectives: learn where the A hive or beehive is the name of Students will learn to: Fill in a diagram of a bee saying comes the structure where honey bees Define pollination Explain the jobs of honey bee from. During live, raise their young, and Name the products of the hive the spring and make honey. Bees are very Identify parts of the honey bee Identify the parts of a flower summer months talented builders. They build a honey bee their nests by shaping Vocabulary: may visit thou- beeswax into what are Honey Propolis sands of flowers called honeycombs Nectar Antenna searching for nectar. This behavior - which are comprised of Foraging Simple eyes is called foraging. A flower’s scent thousands of six-sided, or Beehive Compound and bright colors are very impor- hexagon shaped cells. Beeswax eyes tant. Do you know why they are Honeycomb Stinger Hexagon Calyx important? They are important Beeswax is not collected Wax glands Sepal because this is what initially at- from plants, but is actually made by Royal jelly Petals tracts bees to them. Different kinds the honey bees. The wax is pro- Pollen Ovary of flowers have different scents and duced by the wax glands, which Anthers Filament will make different kinds of honey are located under the abdomen of Pollen sacs Stamen Stigma in different colors. Most bees have the female worker bees. What’s the Buzz on Bees B-1 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  16. 16. LESSON B: The workers create the wax using the sugars Do you know what other products are found in the nectar they collect. Beeswax has contained in a beehive? Royal jelly, produced been used for years in many products people by the bees, is the first food that queen honey use everyday. bees eat. Royal jelly is a food containing lots of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and For instance, when your mom or fats. Many cosmetic companies and sister uses make-up, such as facial health food markets around the world creams, lotions and lipsticks, she use royal jelly to make a variety of is using beeswax because beeswax products. is an ingredient in many of these products. You also use beeswax when You have all probably seen pollen when you put ointment on a cut, when you looking at a flower. It is the yellow powder chew gum, or eat a piece of candy. The Smack, smack... that can get on your skin when you crayons you use are also made using pick or smell a flower. Pollen is a very How do I look? beeswax, and so is the polish used to important item found in the hive. Pollen clean the furniture in your house. And, beeswax comes from the flower’s anthers, which are the is used by candle makers, and it can even be male reproductive cells. Inside these anthers are found in products used by doctors and dentists. pollen sacs that release pollen onto the outside surface of the anthers. Once the pollen is at the Now that the hive is built, the honey bees can surface, it can be collected in the pollen baskets start to fill the honeycombs with honey, baby of the bees or other pollinators that enter the bees and other products. flower. Do you know what might be consid- ered a pollinator other than a bee? Butterflies So do you want to know exactly how honey and other insects that fly from flower to flower is made? As I mentioned, bees collect nec- are all pollinators. Once they go to visit another tar from flowers with their proboscis and store flower, the pollen on their legs from the previous it in their honey stomachs. Honey bees have flower gets spread onto the stigma, a female two stomachs - their regular stomach and their part of the flower, and that is how a flower gets honey stomach. Bees visit between 100 and pollinated. Pollen supplies a bee with the nutri- 1500 flowers to collect enough nectar to fill their ents it needs to ensure proper health. Just as honey stomachs. pollen is important to the health of bees, pollen can also be used as both animal and human When honey bees return food supplements. to the hive, they pass the nectar, which is 80% water, Another item the hive produces is called on to other worker bees propolis. Propolis is a sticky material who suck the nectar from that is collected by bees from tree buds the honey bee’s mouth. The and other plant parts. Beekeepers be- nectar remains in the bee’s lieve that the honey bees use propolis to stomach for about half an honey reinforce the hive, reduce vibrations, and hour. The bees then spread stomach make the hive more secure by sealing up the nectar into cells throughout the extra entrances so it is more difficult for pests to hive where water evaporates from it and it be- enter. It is also believed that honey bees will use comes thicker as the bees fan it with their wings. propolis to prevent diseases in the hive. Bees The bees then seal off the cells of the honey- will carry waste such as dead larvae away from comb with a plug of wax and it remains stored the hive. Propolis and its ingredients also have a until it is eaten. A colony of bees eats between variety of health properties and have long been 120 and 200 pounds of honey a year. used in natural supplements and herbal medi- cines. What’s the Buzz on Bees B-2 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  17. 17. LESSON B:Some beekeepers even think that keeping a legs. The two hind legs are special becausepiece of propolis in your mouth can help cure a they have something attached to them thatsore throat. It has also been used to treat skin help them gather pollen. Can you rememberburns. what they are called? They are the pollen baskets. Pollen is stored in these baskets forTo better understand how all of these prod- transport back to the hive where it is kept foructs are made, it helps to know more about later use. They also have two sets of wings onthe anatomy of honey bees and the parts of a the thorax, the forewings and the hindwings.flower. The last area on the honey bee is the abdo-As you have already learned, there are three men. The stinger and the wax glands aremain parts that make up the located on the abdomens of femalebody of a honey bee. Can you Head honey bees. The stinger allows theremember what those are? honey bee to defend itself and theThere are the head, thorax, hive. Honey bee wax glands areand abdomen. On the honey Thorax found under the abdomen near thebee’s head there are two rear. This is where wax is producedantennae; you have probably and secreted for the honey bees toseen these on many other in- Abdomen use in forming honeycombs. Again,sects. The antennae are what only female honey bees have sting-help the bee feel its surroundings, just like your ers and wax glands.fingers help you feel different things. Flower Power! The parts of a flower areNow, let’s discuss how honey bees see the equally important as the parts of a bee in un-world. Honey bees have two different sets of derstanding how pollination works. The stemeyes. First they have what are called simple supports the flower and connects other planteyes; these are located on the front of their parts such as the leaves together. This is thehead near their antennae, and have only a sin- part you pull when you pick a flower. The calyxgle lens. Our eyes also have only one lens; this is the group of leaves under the petals - eachis the part of the eye that allows you to focus leaf of the calyx is called a sepal. The purposeon things at different distances. This lens does is to protect the flower as it develops from anaturally what glasses or contacts do for peo- bud. Do you know why a flower has petals?ple who cannot see clearly. Flowers have petals, which are often brightlyThe other set of eyes that colored, because they surround and protect thebees have are called com- reproductive organs.pound. Compound eyes arethe two large eyes on the The large rounded bulb at the top of the flowersides of a bee’s head. These is the stigma. The stigma pokes out from theeyes work differently center of the flower and is covered in a stickyfrom our eyes. Com- The Eyes Have it substance so that when pollen grains arepound eyes have tiny deposited onto the stigma by honey bees,sensors that allow bees to tell the difference the pollen will stick; this process is calledbetween brightness and darkness, movement pollination. Located at the bottom of the flowerand color. The honey bee’s tube-like tongue is the female reproductive part called thecalled the proboscis is also located on its head. ovary. The ovary is the part of the flower that protects the ovule and once fertilized will ripenAfter the head comes the thorax. Attached to into a tasty fruit.their thorax, honey bees have three sets of What’s the Buzz on Bees B-3 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  18. 18. LESSON B: Located right around the stigma are the anthers and the filaments; these parts make up the male organs of the flower called the stamen. The anthers are the small structures on the tops of the filaments, which are tall stalks that raise the anthers around the stigma. Inside the anthers are pollen sacs, which release the pollen to the outside of the anthers so that insects entering the flower are able to transfer pollen from the anthers to the stigma. That’s a lot of information about bees and flowers. So now, when you pick a bouquet out of your yard, or eat a piece of toast with honey on it, you can appreciate the many talents of the honey bee. end of Lesson B What’s the Buzz on Bees B-4 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  19. 19. Lesson BVocabulary (Page 1 of 2)an· ten· na: (noun) - one of a pair of slender movable organs of sensation on the head of an arthropod (as an insect or acrab) that are made up of segmentsan· ther: (noun) - the part of the stamen of a flower that produces and contains pollen and is usually borne on a stalk (malesection of a flower)bees· wax: (noun) a yellowish to grayish-brown moldable substance made by bees and used by them to makehoneycombca· lyx: (noun) - the group of leaves under the petals, each leaf of the calyx is referred to as a sepalcom· pound eye: - one of two large eyes on the sides of a bee’s head, which allows the bee to tell the difference betweenbrightness and darkness, movement and colorfil· a· ment: (noun) - the anther-bearing stalk of a plant stamen (male section of a flower)forage: (verb) - to make a search especially for food or supplieshexa· gon: (noun) - a polygon of six angles and six sideshive: (noun) - a container for housing honeybees b: the usually aboveground nest of bees c: a colony of beeshon· ey: (noun) - a thick sugary material prepared by bees from the nectar of flowers and stored by them in a honeycombfor foodhon· ey· comb: (noun) - a mass of six-sided wax cells built by honeybees in their nest to contain young bees and stores ofhoneynec· tar: (noun) - a sweet liquid given off by plants and especially by flowers and used by bees in making honeyova· ry: (noun) - the enlarged rounded lower part of the pistil of a flower in which seeds are formed (female section of aflower)pet· al: (noun) - one of the often brightly colored modified leaves that make up the corolla of a flowerpol· len: (noun) - a mass of tiny particles in the anthers of a flower that fertilize the seeds and usually appear as fine yellowdustpollen sac: (noun) - one of the pouches of a seed plant anther in which pollen is formedprop· o· lis: (noun) - a sticky material that is collected by bees from tree buds and other plant parts. What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  20. 20. Lesson B (Page 2 of 2)royal jelly: (noun) - a substance rich in vitamins and proteins that is secreted from glands in the head of honeybees and isfed to all very young larvae and to all maturing queen beesse· pal: (noun) - one of the specialized leaves that form the calyx of a flowersim· ple eye: (noun) - one of three eyes on the front of a honey bee’s head, have a single lens, which allows the bee tofocus on things at different distancessta· men: (noun) - an organ of a flower that consists of an anther and a filament and produces the pollen (male section of aflower)stig· ma: (noun) - the upper part of the pistil of a flower which receives the pollen grains and on which they start to grow(female section of a flower)sting· er: (noun) - a sharp organ of some animals (as bees or scorpions) that is used to wound, paralyze, or kill prey or anenemy by piercing and injecting a poisonous fluidwax gland: (noun) - group of cells in a honey bee that produces beeswax, located under the abdomen of the worker beeB What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  21. 21. LESSON B: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Know - Want - LearnKnow – Want – Learn (KWL)KWL is a teaching technique created by Ogle (1986) to develop independent learning.Please complete the first two columns “K and W” before the lesson and then completecolumn “L” after the lesson. K – list what you know about bees W – list what you want to know about bees L – list what you learned about bees K W L What I know What I want to know What I learned What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  22. 22. LESSON B: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Word Match (Page 1 of 2) a. pollen basket m. gland b. beeswax n. stinger c. nectar o. honeycomb d. ovary p. honey e. royal jelly q. anther f. wax r. stigma g. antenna s. proboscis h. simple t. pollen i. hybrid u. sepal j. stamen v. petal k. style w. filament l. forage____ one of a pair of slender movable organs of sensation on the head of an arthropod (as an insect or a crab) that are made up of segments_____ not compound____ a long tube-shaped body part (as the sucking organ of a butterfly) in the mouth region of an invertebrate____ a flat or hollow area bordered with stiff hairs on the hind leg of a bee in which it carries pollen to the hive or nest____ a cell or group of cells that makes and secretes a product (as saliva, sweat, bile, or shell) for further use in or for elimination from the plant or animal body____ a sharp organ of some animals (as bees or scorpions) that is used to wound, paralyze, or kill prey or an enemy by piercing and injecting a poisonous fluid____ the upper part of the pistil of a flower which receives the pollen grains and on which they start to grow____ the part of the stamen of a flower that produces and contains pollen and is usually borne on a stalk____ one of the often brightly colored modified leaves that make up the corolla of a flower____ the filiform usually elongated part of the pistil bearing a stigma at its apex____ the anther-bearing stalk of a plant stamen____ the enlarged rounded lower part of the pistil of a flower in which seeds are formed What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  23. 23. LESSON B: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Word Match (Page 2 of 2)____ one of the structures deep inside a flower that together make up the ovary of a flowering plant____ a sweet liquid given off by plants and especially by the flowers and used by bees in making honey____ an offspring of parents with different genes especially when of different races, breeds, species, or genera____ an organ of a flower that consists of an anther and a filament and produces the pollen_____ a thick sugary material prepared by bees from the nectar of flowers and stored by them in a honeycomb for food____ to make a search especially for food or supplies____ a yellowish moldable substance produced by bees and used by them for making the honeycomb____ a mass of six-sided wax cells built by honeybees in their nest to contain young bees and stores of honey____ a substance rich in vitamins and proteins that is secreted from glands in the head of honeybees and is fed to all very young larvae and to all maturing queen bees____ a mass of tiny particles in the anthers of a flower that fertilize the seeds and usually appear as fine yellow dust____ a yellowish to grayish-brown moldable substance made by bees and used by them to make honeycomb What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  24. 24. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:Identify the Bee Parts!Use the word bank provided below to label the bee’s anatomy. Compund eyes Abdomen Stinger Wings Head Word Box Pollen baskets Simple eyes Antenna Thorax Legs What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  25. 25. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:The Power of a Flower!Not only do they look pretty and smell good; but flowers also serve a very important purpose.Flowers are actually what enable a plant to reproduce. Below is a cross section of a flower.Use the word bank provided below to label the flowers different parts. Word Box ovule petals stem anthers pollen grains stigma filament sepal style ovary receptacle stamen nectary pistil What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  26. 26. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:The Power of a Flower!Not only do they look pretty and smell good; but flowers also serve a very important purpose.Flowers are actually what enable a plant to reproduce. Below is a cross section of a flower.Use the word bank provided below to label the flowers different parts. Word Box Petal Stem Pollen grains Sepal Filament Anther Receptical Stigma What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  27. 27. LESSON B: Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Bee Maze Bissy has just returned from a wonderful garden that has many flowers. Help her communicate to the other bees how to navigate their way to the garden by finding your way through the maze to the garden. ACreated with Puzzlemaker on DiscoverSchool.com What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  28. 28. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:Activation Pollination!TEACHER INFORMATIONHoney Bees are very important to plants. This is because bees are pollinators. Pollinators are animals that help plantsreproduce, or make more plants, by spreading pollen from one plant to another. The bright colors and scent of flowersare what attract bees. Once a bee lands on a flower, it crawls inside to drink the nectar. Then, the pollen grains that areon the flower’s anthers, stick to the bee’s body. They then “comb” the pollen from their body and deposit it onto their backlegs. This part of their leg is called their pollen basket.MATERIALS:• One copy of the honey bee drawing and one of the flower for each student• Color pencils, crayons, or markers• Colored chalk• Scissors• Q-tips or cotton balls• Masking tapeTo help students better understand how pollination works, students will act out the following activity and take turns actingas the honey bee and then the flower.1) Have students color the pictures of the honey bee and flower. Remind them what colors honey bees are, and explainto them that when they color the flower, they need to make it pretty and colorful so that it will attract lots of bees.2) Once they have colored both pictures, have them cut them out.3) Have each student pick out one color of chalk and color the middle of their flower with it. Explain to them that the chalkwill act as pollen.4) Divide the class in half. Half of the class will act as the honey bees while the other half will be the flowers.5) Have the students who are the flowers move to different areas of the classroom with their flowers that they havecolored and have them stand still like a flower.6) Use masking tape to tape the picture of the honey bee to the shirts of the students who are the bees and give themeach a cotton ball or Q-tip. Explain to the students that the cotton balls or Q-tips are similar to the fine hairs found on thelegs and bodies of bees. As they move from flower to flower, have them simulate gathering nectar by dabbing their Q-tipor cotton ball on a colored-flower’s center and then move on to another flower and dab on that flower’s center and so on.They will pick up the pollen or chalk from one flower and then transfer it to another flower. You may want to demonstratethis for the students before they begin. Have the student ‘bees’ move from flower to flower, visiting as many as they can inabout one minute.7) Once they are done, have the students look at their cotton balls and see all the different colors, as well as the centersof the flowers.8) Finally, have the students switch so that those who were the honey bees can now be the flowers and those who werethe flowers can now be the honey bees.CONCLUSION:Once the students have completed this activity have them return to their seats for a short discussion. Give students theopportunity to take turns explaining the process of pollination to the teacher or each other. Next ask the class which flowerwas their favorite and why? Was there one flower that more of the bees decided to go to? If so why? Also, which honeybee was the busiest bee and visited the most flowers? What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  29. 29. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:Activation Pollination!Color the flower pictured below to make it as beautiful as possible. Once you have finished coloring, cut along thedotted lines. Next, pick out one color of chalk and color the center of your flower. The chalk will represent the flower’spollen. What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  30. 30. Name:_________________________ Date:____________LESSON B:Activation Pollination!Color the honey bee pictured below. Can you remember what colors make a honey bee? After you have colored yourbee, cut along the dotted lines. What’s the Buzz on Bees B FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  31. 31. Lesson C What keeps abeekeeper busy?
  32. 32. LESSON C:What Keeps aBeekeeper Busy?OVERVIEW: Hundreds of years ago, beekeep- Hi Kids, Bissy ers started making man-made Bee here again. hives, which allowed them to close- Have you ever ly observe the bees. Now that we wondered where know more about how bees live,Bissy Bee exactly bees live? we can help protect them, and har- vest their honey and other impor-Well, so far you have learned that tant products.bees live in hives, but where doyou find these hives? In nature, Honey bees live in large groups orbees like to make their hives in colonies that have anywhere from Sunshine Statequiet dark places where they will 40,000 to 60,000 bees. Colonies Standards:be protected and not be easily dis- that are looked after by beekeepers Students will:turbed. That is why feral, or wild, are called managed hives. These Understand that people, alone orhoney bees often select places in managed hives are kept in protec- in groups, invent new tools to solve problems and do work that affectsthe woods like old hollowed out tive wooden boxes and placed near aspects of life outside of science. Know that a successful method totrees. Sometimes they may even flowering plants and trees that the explore the natural world is to ob-choose to establish a nest in at- bees like, and also in locations serve and record, and then analyze and communicate the results.tics or walls of houses. For honey near plenty of water. Areas like thisbees, these all seem like excellent are called bee yards or apiaries.safe places to make their home. The bee yards act as a safe havenHowever, most people don’t want where the bees can fly around and Objectives: get everything they need close to Students will learn:bees living in their walls and theydon’t want to waste all the honey their hive. The difference between feral and managed beesthat is produced in these unman- The basic structure of a beehiveaged wild hives. Inside the man-made bee boxes What beekeepers do and the equipment they use are wooden frames that are sand- How beehives are moved around wiched together. This structure to help pollinate crops That is why people inter- ested in extracting the allows worker bees to attach the tasty honey out of the six-sided cells, that hives had are formed by the to design wax they produce, Vocabulary: equip- onto the surface of Feral ment and the frames, creat- Beekeeper Managed hive develop ing a honeycomb. Apiary methods Do you know what Hexagonfor ‘keeping’ bees, or managing a six-sided geo- Pheromonethem. These are the people we metric shape isrefer to as beekeepers. called? What’s the Buzz on Bees C-1 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  33. 33. LESSON C: A six-sided geometric shape is items such as pine straw, grass, and burlap called a hexagon; this is the are put to burn as fuel and produce smoke. shape of the honeycomb. The smoke helps calm the bees. Only a little Bees are very accomplished smoke is needed to cover up the bee’s alarm architects and they make pheromone. A pheromone is a chemical odor the honeycomb a hexagon produced by animals that triggers a response because it is the strongest and from the same species – think of it like a largest shape. The cells of perfume that a human might wear to attract the honeycomb are designed another human. In bees, this scent signals for storage and each houses other bees to come to their aid with their something different. Located in Worker stingers ready because they are in danger. the center of the honeycomb bee feeding Therefore, instead of becoming panicked, the is an area reserved for the larva (baby bees relax and are less likely to sting. Once nursery, where the developing bee) the bees are calm, the beekeeper is able to bees are kept. Here, the young easily harvest the honey and other products bees are protected from dangers and changing from the hive. weather conditions. Just outside the nursery is where the pollen is stored, so that the young Beekeepers have many jobs to do to keep can be easily fed. Meanwhile, honey is kept their hives healthy. For one, in Florida they around the outer area of the honeycomb. The register their bees with the Florida Department frames can then be carefully lifted out by the of Agriculture & Consumer Services who beekeepers in order to gain access to the bees comes out and inspects the hives for harmful without causing them harm. pests and diseases. Another important job that beekeepers do is moving the hives around For the beekeeper to do a good job, he or she to different areas to help pollinate different must be prepared and have crops at different times of the year. Florida the correct equipment. beekeepers may place their managed bee The first thing a beekeeper colonies in orange groves, melon or blueberry needs is a bee suit. This fields throughout the year. And at other times, suit covers his/her body many Florida beekeepers may move their and closes tightly around the managed bee colonies temporarily to other wrists and ankles so that bees states to pollinate crops, such as to California do not accidentally fly into the to help pollinate almond trees. beekeeper’s clothing. Next. he/she needs gloves and a veil. Beekeeping is a not an easy job, but the many The gloves help protect the benefits of producing healthy hives make the beekeeper’s hands as they pull hard work worthwhile. out the frames that contain the honeycomb. The veil is also very important because it covers the Next time you taste some honey, think beekeeper’s entire head so that bees cannot about what you’ve learned about sting the beekeeper’s face. busy bees and their hardworking beekeepers. The next piece of important equipment that a beekeeper needs is a smoker. The end of Lesson C smoker is a small cone- shaped tool that is often made of copper. Attached to it is Smoker what is called a fire box, where What’s the Buzz on Bees C-2 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  34. 34. Lesson CVocabularyapi· ary: (noun) - a place where bees are kept; especially: a collection of hives of bees kept for their honeybee· keep· er: (noun) - a person who raises beesfe· ral: (adjective) - having escaped from domestication and become wildhexa· gon: (noun) - a polygon of six angles and six sidesman· age: (verb) - to make and keep under one’s control: (handle)pher· o· mone: (noun) - a chemical substance (as a scent) that is produced by an animal and serves as a signal to otherindividuals of the same species to engage in some kind of behavior What’s the Buzz on Bees C FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  35. 35. LESSON C: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Know - Want - LearnKnow – Want – Learn (KWL)KWL is a teaching technique created by Ogle (1986) to develop independent learning.Please complete the first two columns “K and W” before the lesson and then completecolumn “L” after the lesson. K – list what you know about bees W – list what you want to know about bees L – list what you learned about bees K W L What I know What I want to know What I learned What’s the Buzz on Bees C FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  36. 36. LESSON C: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Word Match a. honey bee b. manage c. pollinate d. pheromone e. honeycomb f. larva g. apiary h. hexagon i. hive j. beekeeper l. feral k. colony_____ a place where beehives are placed near flowers and water_____ a person who raises bees_____ a population of plants or animals in a particular place that belong to one species_____ having escaped from domestication and become wild_____ a polygon of six angles and six sides_____a container for housing honey bees_____a bee that produces honey and lives in colonies_____ a mass of six-sided wax cells built by honey bees in their nest to contain young bees and stores of honey_____ a young wingless often wormlike form that hatches from the egg of many insects_____ to make and keep under one’s control_____ a chemical substance (as a scent) that is produced by an animal and serves as a signal to other individuals of the same species to engage in some kind of behavior (as mating)_____ to mark or smudge with pollen What’s the Buzz on Bees C FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  37. 37. LESSON C: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Crossword PuzzleUse the clues below to fill in the blanks.Across2. Young wormlike insect life stage hatched from egg4. Worn by beekeepers to protect their face7. Made by bees to hold honey and young Down8. A group of honey bees is called a ___________ 1. Wild or unmanaged9. 6-sided shape of a bee’s cell 3. A place where bees and beehives are kept10. Bees live in a ___________ 5. Signal used by bees to alert other bees of danger11. Insects that produce honey and pollinate flowers 6. Bees ________ flowersCreated with Puzzlemaker on DiscoverSchool.com What’s the Buzz on Bees C FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  38. 38. LESSON C: Name:_________________________ Date:____________ Bee Maze Help Bissy find her way back to the hive.Created with Puzzlemaker on DiscoverSchool.com What’s the Buzz on Bees C FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  39. 39. Lesson D What are Africanized honey bees and why should you,“bee aware, look, listen, and run”?
  40. 40. LESSON D:Africanized honey beesBee Aware of Your Environment…Look, Listen, and Run!OVERVIEW: Hi, it’s me again, pollen sacs, and when the bee flies Bissy Bee. I’ve away it carries the pollen stuck on got some impor- its legs. When the bee lands on tant information another flower while looking for about one of my nectar (a sugary-liquid inside the Bissy Bee not-so-nice rela- flower), the pollen that is stuck on tives, but don’t its legs falls out onto the flower,worry, not all bees are mean. and pollination is underway. Fruits and vegetables like watermelons,People are often afraid of bees. cucumbers, squash and most ofWatch your classmates next time our blueberries and strawberries, Sunshine Statea bee accidentally flies into the are all plants that are pollinated by Standards:classroom. How do they react? honey bees. Pollination provided Students will: Know that all living thingsSome may get scared and swat at by honey bees is responsible for must compete for earth’s limited resources - organisms bestthe bee. The best way to act is to 1/3 of the food we eat. adapted to compete for the avail-leave the bee alone. If you swat at able resources will be success- ful and pass their adaptationsit or try to shoo it away, it might get Above, and in previous lessons, (traits) to their offspringmad or defensive. you learned how important honey Understand that changes in the habitat of an organism may be bees are. The honey bee most beneficial or harmful Recognize the use of compari-Bees use their stingers when they often used by beekeepers in man- son and contrast in a textfeel threatened or fear that their aged colonies is the European Recognize cause and effect relationships in literary textshive, or their home, is in danger. honey bee.Protecting the hive is their job. Objectives: Now it’s time to learn about a rela- Students will learn to: Explain the importance of man-This is why only beekeepers tive of the gentle European honey aged honey beesshould try to handle bees, because bee. The relative, that recently Describe the differences be- tween Africanized and Europeanthey know how to work with bees became established in Florida, is honey bees Discuss why the statementwithout hurting them and without a very defensive or grumpy cousin “Bee Aware…Look, Listen andgetting hurt themselves. Beekeep- of the European honey bee. It is Run” is a good motto for the Africanized honey bee educationers have special equipment, called called the African honey bee be- programbee veils or bee suits that they use cause it originated in Africa. Explain what to do if he or she is attacked by beesto protect themselves. Vocabulary:Bees are beneficial insects, be- Defensivecause in addition to making honey, Beneficialwhich is used in all kinds of food Established Africanized honey beeand medicines, they also pollinate Hybridplants which help grow the fruit, Swarmvegetables and nuts we love to Pheromoneeat. When a bee lands on a flower, Grizelda, the grumpy beeits legs brush against the flower’s What’s the Buzz on Bees D-1 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  41. 41. LESSON D: In the 1600’s, soon after our country was hive; and they both have a queen, workers and founded, European honey bees were brought drones in their hives. to America from Europe by early settlers. They are the same sub-species of honey bees you Africanized honey bees swarm, or reproduce, see in your backyards. Fast forward 350 years approximately 16 times a year; while the Euro- to the 1950’s when the African honey bee was pean honey bee reproduces only two times a brought from Africa to Brazil for an experiment year. When you see many bees moving together to see how it would perform in the sub-tropical in a swarm, they are usually looking for a new Brazilian climate. This sub-species of honey bee home. They are not dangerous during this time can work more efficiently in hotter temperatures because they have not established a home than their European cousin.The scientists that yet to defend. But no matter what the bees are brought the African honey bees to Brazil knew doing, if you see a large group of bees, always these bees were more defensive than the Euro- stay away from them - go inside and tell an adult pean honey bees, but hoped when they mated what you have seen. with the European bees, they would become less defensive. Africanized honey bee queens lay up to 4,000 eggs a day, while the European honey bee What actually happened in that experiment in queens lay approximately 2,000 a day. That Brazil was that some of the African bees es- means there is the potential for the Africanized caped, mated with European bees and became bees to spread more quickly. a hybrid bee, part European and part African. Now they are called Africanized honey bees. Unlike the European honey bees who prefer These Africanized honey bees spread through- to build nests in larger dry places up off the out South America, into Central America, and in ground, the Africanized honey bees will build the 1990’s they were discovered in the United a nest just about anywhere – in small holes States in Texas. In 2002, they were found in around the outside of your house, in old tires, Florida. Now they are here to stay, and we have flower pots, bird nests, water meter boxes, to learn how to live with them. barbecue grills, in the ground or in hollowed-out tree trunks. Why should we care if they are African- ized honey bees or the regular Euro- If they feel threatened, Africanized pean honey bees we are used to? We honey bees will send out a scout should care because Africanized honey from the nest to investigate. If that bees can be dangerous to humans and scout stings a person or animal animals, and we need to learn what to do they perceive as a threat, they will to avoid being stung. Let’s discuss some emit a pheromone, or odor, that of the characteristics of these different will signal its hive mates to come sub-species of honey bees. and attack. As many as 60,000 Calling all bees! bees live in a nest and many of To the average person, Africanized honey them could come out to attack. bees look identical to the more gentle European They have been known to chase people or ani- honey bee. Only scientists can tell the differ- mals for up to a quarter of a mile which is more ence. One difference is the Africanized bees than the length of three football fields (mile is have slightly smaller wings than the European 5,280 feet; quarter of a mile is 1,320 feet; foot- bee. ball field is 360 feet in length). Other similarities include: they both produce Because the Africanized honey bees are so de- honey; pollinate plants; swarm, or reproduce fensive, they will defend their nests if they think by moving to another location to start a new someone or something is threatening them. What’s the Buzz on Bees D-2 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  42. 42. LESSON D:That ‘someone’ might be you or your family The Africanized honeyplaying in the backyard or in a public park; bees will also attackit may be a landscaper mowing a yard; or it animals. Protect yourmight be a utility worker checking the me- pets and livestock byter boxes. The Africanized honey bees also asking your parentsdon’t like loud vibrating noises like lawn not to leave animalsmowers, leaf blowers or chain saws. They tied up in the yard. Ifhave excellent senses of sight and sound these animals were tothat they use to detect potential threats. be attacked by bees, they would not be ableSo what can you do to avoid encounters to run away.with Africanized honey bees? The FloridaDepartment of Agriculture & Consumer Follow the Look,Services recommends that you follow this Listen and Run I looked, I listened,advice: Bee Aware of Your Environment advice. Avoid and I ran!. . . Look, Listen and RUN. Africanized honey bees just like you do other bitingLook: Tell your parents, and you can help and stinging insects like fire ants, yellow jackets,them too, to look around your house and spiders and snakes. It doesn’t mean they areyard regularly to see if there are any signs bad, they just defend themselves in ways thatof bees establishing a nest. You would see could hurt you. Avoid them and they shouldbees coming and going from a hole in your leave you alone too.house or from a wood pile or the other itemsor places we talked about earlier. Listen: Share this information with your parents andWhile you’re looking, also listen for any make a plan for regularly checking your housebuzzing that might help you see where bees or anywhere you are outdoors for possible Afri-or other insects might be nesting. canized honey bee nesting sites.If you see bees or other insects and it lookslike they have established a nest, tell your Remember that managed honey bee coloniesparents or another adult to contact a li- that are cared for by beekeepers contain morecensed pest control company right away gentle bees, and they are providingto remove the nest. Do not try to remove the important pollination services thator disturb a nest yourself – it could be very produce delicious fruits, veg-dangerous. Your parents or teachers should etables and nuts. Honey beenot try to remove nests themselves either hives managed by beekeep-because of the danger. ers can even discourage the establishment of AfricanizedNow, what if you get attacked by bees or honey bees in an area, be-other stinging insects, what do you think cause when an Africanizedyou should do? That’s right, RUN! The best honey bee comes along and sees an area isthing you can do is run as fast as you can already occupied by other bees, it will often justinside your house or a building. If you can, move on to another location.while you’re running, cover your nose andmouth, because the bees are attracted by So when you see those white bee boxes inthe air that comes out of these areas. Do not fields, you’ll know that busy bees are hard atjump in a pool to avoid the bees. They will work pollinating plants and making honey andjust hang around and wait for you. other important products in their hives. end of Lesson D What’s the Buzz on Bees D-3 FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  43. 43. Lesson DVocabularyAf· ri· can· ized honey bee: (noun) - a hybrid sub-species of honey bee (African and European) that is more defensive andwill defend their hive in large numbersben· e· fi· cial: (adjective) - producing results that are good for health and happinessde· fen· sive: (adjective) - serving to defend or protectes· tab· lish· ed: (verb) - to be settled in a new areahy· brid: (noun) - an offspring of parents with different genes especially when of different races, breeds, species, orgenerapher· o· mone: (noun) - a chemical substance (as a scent) that is produced by an animal and serves as a signal to otherindividuals of the same species to engage in some kind of behaviorswarm: (noun) - a group of honey bees who leave their hive to look for another location to build a new hive What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  44. 44. LESSON D: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Know - Want - LearnKnow – Want – Learn (KWL)KWL is a teaching technique created by Ogle (1986) to develop independent learning.Please complete the first two columns “K and W” before the lesson and then completecolumn “L” after the lesson. K – list what you know about bees W – list what you want to know about bees L – list what you learned about bees K W L What I know What I want to know What I learned What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  45. 45. LESSON D: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Where bees might beAfricanized honey bees are not very picky when it comes to selecting a nesting site. Below is an illustration thatcontains some of the places bees might chose to make their home. List as many places as you can find in thepicture below where bees may make their homes. 1. _______________________________ 8. _______________________________ 2._______________________________ 9. _______________________________ 3. _______________________________ 10._______________________________ 4. _______________________________ 11. _______________________________ 5. _______________________________ 12. _______________________________ 6._______________________________ 13. _______________________________ 7. _______________________________ 14._______________________________ What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  46. 46. LESSON D: Name:_________________________ Date:____________What is not a honey bee?Cut out the flash cards along the dotted lines. Use cards to memorize each insect’s name and description. What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  47. 47. LESSON D: Name:_________________________ Date:____________ What is not a honey bee? Cut out the flash cards along the dotted lines. Use cards to memorize each insect’s name and description.yellow jacket - social wasp, bumble bee - found world- carpenter bee - resembleblack bands on yellow abdomen, build wide, large and hairy, usually black bumble bees in size and color, but doexposed nests or underground nests, with wide yellow bands, build nests in not have hair on their abdomen andwill sting to defend their nest, can sting the ground or in abandoned bird nests, appear shiny, make nests in woodenmultiple times live in organized groups with queens, structures or tree limbs, females rare- workers and drones ly bite and male (non-stinging)may fly at anyone who approaches their nesthorse fly - range in size, yellow fly - looks like a deer paper wasp - constructiridescent eyes, strong fliers, usually fly, clear wings, bright blue-green eyes, nests out of paper type material,found in wooded wet areas, may cary black fore-wings and others are yellow, black, brown or red in color with yel-animal diseases, females bite may be yellow abdomen, black hair on the low markings, live in a colony, feed onpainful sides with a yellow hair stripe down the insects middle, females bite while malesdeer flies - similar to horse fly, gather pollen and feed on nectarbut smaller and different wingsleaf cutter bee - native baldface hornet - type larra wasp - solitary wasp,pollinator, black in color, about the size of yellow jacket, black with white head, not aggressive, parasatoid to theof a honey bee, females carry pollen make large aerial nest, may sting mole cricket, black with red abdomen,on their abdomens, make nests out of multiple times, eat insects attracted to silver marking on the head, feeds oncut leaves, solitary bee sugar - plants or sweet food items many types of flowers What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  48. 48. Compare and Contrast Use the Venn diagram below to compare and contrast the similarities and differences between Africanized honey bees and European honey bees. Fill in the section labeled AHB with everything that makes Africanized honey bees different from European honey bees, then do the same for the other side labeled EHB. In the middle section where the circles overlap, fill in the similarities between the two kinds of honey bees. LESSON D: AHB EHB BothWhat’s the Buzz on BeesDFDACS - Division of Plant Industry Name:_________________________ Date:____________
  49. 49. LESSON D: Name:_________________________ Date:____________Word Match a. honey bee b. pollen sac c. pheromone d. insect e. beekeeper f. nectar g. hive h. pollinate i. beneficial j. hybrid k. defensive_____ a person who raises bees_____ producing results that are good for health and happiness_____ resisting or preventing attack_____ a container for housing honeybees_____ a bee that produces honey and lives in colonies_____ an offspring of parents with different genes especially when of different races, breeds, species, or genera_____ any of a class of arthropods with the body clearly divided into a head, thorax, and abdomen, with three pairs of jointed legs, and usually with one or two pairs of wings_____ a sweet liquid given off by plants and especially by the flowers and used by bees in making honey_____ one of the pouches of a seed plant anther in which pollen is formed_____ to mark or smudge with pollen_____ a chemical substance (as a scent) that is produced by an animal and serves as a signal to other individuals of the same species to engage in some kind of behavior (as mating) What’s the Buzz on Bees D FDACS - Division of Plant Industry
  50. 50. Dear Parent or Guardian: Your child participated in a Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’curriculum, “What’s the buzz on bees.” The lessons covered the biology of honey bees andflowers, the history of bees in the US, and the important role bees play in agriculture. Onesection of the material covers a species of honey bee called Africanized honey bees. These honeybees are more defensive than the average honey bee in Florida. It is important for your family tolearn about Africanized honey bees because they are now established in our state. These beeshave already caused problems for Florida residents because they can nest in unusual placesaround your house and yard, and can sting in larger numbers when they feel their hive isthreatened.Africanized honey bee facts Look similar to the more common gentle European honey bees Defend their homes or hives if they feel threatened Pollinate, but not as well as European honey bees Can cause harm like many other Florida insects, such as fire ants and yellow jacket wasps Since it is hard to tell bees apart, the Florida Department of Agriculture and ConsumerServices wants you to Bee Aware of your Environment … Look, Listen and Run.Look, Listen The most important thing you can do is be aware of your surroundings Stay alert when working or playing in your yard or in natural areas Look for bees before you or your family use power tools or lawn mowers Be careful around possible nesting sites such as wood piles, bird houses, flower pots, and barbecue grills Walk away and stay away if you see an insect nest or a swarm of beesRun Run away and get inside a house or building; bees will chase people and animals up to 1/4 mile Call a licensed pest control operator to remove nest, do not attempt to remove it yourself If stung, remove stinger by scraping it out with a fingernail or card – squeezing the stinger will inject more venom If you are stung and have a reaction, call for medical help Respect all bees and insects
  51. 51. Parent Information LetterPage 2 of 2 Another important thing to do to protect your family is bee proofing your home. Remove places where bees could build a nest. Bee proofing your home Seal any cracks or holes in your home that are over 1/8 inch Put fine gauge screen over open areas Remove anything that could be a potential nesting site – empty flower pots, old tires, grills Inspect around your home often to make sure no bees have built nests, bees can build nests very quickly and in Florida, they are active most of the year If you see a nest, call a licensed pest control operator, do not attempt to remove it yourself Find places where bees could nest. Please review this information with your family. Remember, Bee Aware of Your Environment … Look, Listen and Run. Visit www.doacs.state.fl.us/pi or contact our helpline at 888-397-1517 for more information. Sincerely, Charles H. Bronson, Commissioner Richard Gaskalla Division Director
  52. 52. E: Bonus Activities Bonus Activities

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