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Why It MattersThe idea of reform–the drive to improve societyand the lives of Americans–grew during themid-1800s. Reformer...
The Impact TodayThe spirit of reform is alive and well in themodern world. Individual freedom became akey goal during the ...
Chapter ObjectivesSection 3: The Women’s Movement• Examine how the antislavery and the women’s  rights movements were rela...
Women and Reform• Women abolitionists were the first to also  campaign for women’s rights, to improve  women’s lives, and ...
Women and Reform (cont.)• The first women’s rights convention took place  in Seneca Falls, New York, in July 1848. • It i...
Women and Reform (cont.)• The women’s rights movement grew. • Women held conventions. • Many reformers, including men, j...
Progress by American Women (cont.)• Women did not have advanced institutions that  they could attend, so they were prevent...
Progress by American Women (cont.)• Women made some gains in marriage and  property laws in New York, Pennsylvania,  India...
Progress by American Women (cont.)• Some women were able to break into the fields  of medicine and the ministry or other  ...
Explore online information about the topics introducedin this chapter.Click on the Connect button to launch yourbrowser an...
Ch. 14 3 pp
Ch. 14 3 pp
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Ch. 14 3 pp

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Ch. 14 3 pp

  1. 1. Why It MattersThe idea of reform–the drive to improve societyand the lives of Americans–grew during themid-1800s. Reformers set outto improve the lives of the disadvantaged,especially enslaved people and the urban poor.
  2. 2. The Impact TodayThe spirit of reform is alive and well in themodern world. Individual freedom became akey goal during the last half of the twentiethcentury. Civil rights movements have advancedracial equality. In many countries the women’smovement has altered traditional female rolesand opportunities.
  3. 3. Chapter ObjectivesSection 3: The Women’s Movement• Examine how the antislavery and the women’s rights movements were related. • Evaluate what progress women made toward equality during the 1800s. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  4. 4. Women and Reform• Women abolitionists were the first to also campaign for women’s rights, to improve women’s lives, and win equal rights.  (pages 425–427) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  5. 5. Women and Reform (cont.)• The first women’s rights convention took place in Seneca Falls, New York, in July 1848. • It issued a Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions that called for the following:  - an end to all laws that discriminated against women  - entrance into the all-male worlds of trade, professions, and business  - suffrage, or the right to vote (pages 425–427) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  6. 6. Women and Reform (cont.)• The women’s rights movement grew. • Women held conventions. • Many reformers, including men, joined the movement. • Beginning in 1890 with Wyoming but not ending until 1920, woman suffrage finally became legal everywhere in the United States. (pages 425–427) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  7. 7. Progress by American Women (cont.)• Women did not have advanced institutions that they could attend, so they were prevented from becoming doctors, lawyers, and other professionals. • Before the 1830s, no university or college would accept women. • The belief was that women should not have advanced education and that it was useless and even dangerous for women to learn such subjects as mathematics. (pages 427–428) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  8. 8. Progress by American Women (cont.)• Women made some gains in marriage and property laws in New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Wisconsin, Mississippi, and California. • Some states passed laws permitting women to share guardianship of their children with their husbands. • Indiana was the first state to allow divorce to a woman if her husband was alcoholic. (pages 427–428) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  9. 9. Progress by American Women (cont.)• Some women were able to break into the fields of medicine and the ministry or other previously all-male professions. • Progress was limited, however, by social customs and expectations. (pages 427–428) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  10. 10. Explore online information about the topics introducedin this chapter.Click on the Connect button to launch yourbrowser and go to The American Republic to1877 Web site. At this site, you will findinteractive activities, current eventsinformation, and Web sites correlated with thechapters and units in the textbook. When youfinish exploring, exit the browser program toreturn to this presentation. If you experiencedifficulty connecting to the Web site, manuallylaunch your Web browser and go tohttp://tarvol1.glencoe.com

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