DigitalCitizenship :
A Parent’s Guide
Prepared by Fran Kompar, Coordinator, Media Services in collaboration with Laura Je...
WhatWeWill Cover
 What is Digital Citizenship
 Take the Quiz
 Write questions/comments on Padlet for Q&A at end of
pres...
A Quick Quiz
Living in a Digital Society
 Guiding questions for parents, teachers and
students:
What is the acceptable and appropriate...
What is Digital Citizenship?
Digital
Citizenship
can be
defined as the
norms of
appropriate,
responsible,
ethical and
effe...
Has yourTeen Ever Known aWorld Without the Internet?
 1993 - World Wide Web – Mosaic
 1995 – World Wide Web reaches Clas...
Changing Landscape
Source: Los Angeles Times
2010 Study from Kaiser Foundation.
Stats on use of online sites by Teens (Information from Net Smartz Website):
 93% of teens (12-17) go online.
 75% of te...
Raising Digital Citizens
Know the Laws
 CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act)
 Enacted in Congress in 2000. Updated in 2011.
 Requires filte...
CIPA
CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act) requires school and
libraries receiving E-rate funding for Internet access ...
COPPA
Websites that collect information from children under
the age of thirteen are required to comply with the
Federal Tr...
Privacy Rules
13
What has Changed?
 Passing notes = Texting / Chatting
 Buying CDs = Downloading music
 Playing board games = Online gam...
Scale
Everything takes place before a
vast audience
“15 minutes of fame”
You don’t know who will see your
information
YourTeen’s Digital
Footprint
Nothing ever truly disappears in the
digital world, and everything you post on
social media s...
Explain that nothing is
really private
Set up privacy settings
Keep passwords private
Protecting Personal Privacy
Strategies to Help you Monitor your
Teen’s Digital Footprint
 Use privacy settings (and only use sites that have privacy ...

Tips on Social
Media
Use of Social Media
 Social Media is now open at GHS
 Great educational opportunity - social media has transformed the w...
Talk to yourTeen
 Review the apps your teen uses on their smartphone and the computer and talk about what
information the...
Twitter
Privacy Options & Settings
 Twitter is a free "microblogging" and social networking site that
allows users to pos...
Facebook
 Facebook is an online social network
on which users can share status
updates, pictures, and video.
 Facebook u...
Privacy Settings
Only Friends
Know your Lingo
BRB - Be right back
POS-parents over shoulder
A/S/L - ??
Instagram
 Instagram is a photo and video sharing social
networking service.
 If your teen is ready for Instagram, go th...
Risky Online Decisions
• “Friending” unknown people
• Posting personal information
• Embarrassing or harassing people
• Ta...
Social Media in a Nutshell
 Many social media sites are beneficial, necessary part of
our society. Some are bad. The tric...

Teaching Digital Citizenship
Standard 4: Students practice responsible, legal, safe and ethical uses of information reso...
Teaching Digital Citizenship
Curriculum Strand: Digital Citizenship includes instruction on the following:
 Responsible a...
Teaching Digital Citizenship:
Resources
 Responsible and ethical use - emphasis on plagiarism and
helping students to giv...
Essential Skills and Positive Results
Tips toTake WithYou
 Get involved
 Learn about social media platforms with your teen
 Investigate the social media your...
Resources
GPS Virtual Library Resources – For quality research
texts and digital tools.
Mentioned in this presentation:
Sp...
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Digital Citizenship Guide for Parents of Teens.

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  • Notice that CIPA is about school and library policies—but think about how you can apply these to the way you protect your own minor in your home…how you can adapt these to your own family’s approach to social media and Internet usehttp://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2012/12/ftc-strengthens-kids-privacy-gives-parents-greater-control-over
  • This is why when your teen was younger and signed up for the Disney game site, PBS Kids site, or other children’s website, you got an e-mail that verified that you knew what your child had signed up for and what information they gave to sign up.Recommend http://www.onguardonline.gov/articles/0031-protecting-your-childs-privacy-onlinehttp://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2012/12/ftc-strengthens-kids-privacy-gives-parents-greater-control-over
  • …educational information by searching a particular hashtag or author, for example
  • This screenshot doesn’t represent the worst or (obviously) the best of Facebook, but it does show you one of the biggest problems surrounding Facebook privacy settings…http://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/how-to-report/
  • Talk to your teen about what they plan to share on InstagramHelp your teen set their posts to private so that anyone who wants to see their posts must send a follower requestShow your teen how to block users who they do not want to view their photos or videosShow your teen the built-in reporting features they can use to report inappropriate content
  • Internet safetypresentationghs

    1. 1. DigitalCitizenship : A Parent’s Guide Prepared by Fran Kompar, Coordinator, Media Services in collaboration with Laura Jean Waters, , GHS Media 1
    2. 2. WhatWeWill Cover  What is Digital Citizenship  Take the Quiz  Write questions/comments on Padlet for Q&A at end of presentation  Changing Landscape: What are Teens Doing Online?  Laws that affect use of the Internet for Students  Focus on COPPA and CIPA.  The Digital Footprint Definition and Strategies  Your Role in Keeping your Teen Safe  Teaching Digital Citizenship – School and Home Resources
    3. 3. A Quick Quiz
    4. 4. Living in a Digital Society  Guiding questions for parents, teachers and students: What is the acceptable and appropriate use of the Internet in schools? What are the expectations? At school? At home? What boundaries are already in place and what additional instruction will take place to ensure students create a positive online community in a digital environment at school and home?
    5. 5. What is Digital Citizenship? Digital Citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible, ethical and effective use of digital technology. 5 9 Elements of Digital Citizenship (Ribble 2011)
    6. 6. Has yourTeen Ever Known aWorld Without the Internet?  1993 - World Wide Web – Mosaic  1995 – World Wide Web reaches Classrooms  1995 – Wikis introduced  1998 – Google launches  2005 – Podcasting word of the year  2005 – YouTube website is founded  2006 – Facebook opened  2006 – Twitter launched  2010 – Apple launches iPad Padlet Visual Timeline: http://padlet.com/wall/84fvdrucvg
    7. 7. Changing Landscape Source: Los Angeles Times 2010 Study from Kaiser Foundation.
    8. 8. Stats on use of online sites by Teens (Information from Net Smartz Website):  93% of teens (12-17) go online.  75% of teens (12-17) have cell phones.  On average, texting teens (12-17) send and receive 1500 text messages a month.  97% of teens (12-17) play computer, web, portable, or console games. 27% of teens (12-17) play games with people they don’t know online.  1 in 25 youths received an online sexual solicitation where the solicitor tried to make offline contact.  73% of teens (12-17) have profiles on social networking sites
    9. 9. Raising Digital Citizens
    10. 10. Know the Laws  CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act)  Enacted in Congress in 2000. Updated in 2011.  Requires filtering of obscene/inappropriate content, acceptable use policy, and curriculum for teaching digital citizenship.  COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act)  Applies to children 13 and under.  Protection of personal information, requirement of privacy policy, involvement of parents through “Family Center”, etc.
    11. 11. CIPA CIPA (Children’s Internet Protection Act) requires school and libraries receiving E-rate funding for Internet access to adopt an internet safety policy that addresses:  Safety and Security of minors using e-mail and other forms of direct electronic communication  Unauthorized access or unlawful activity by minors online  Unauthorized disclosure, use and dissemination of the personal information of minors  Measures to restrict minors’ access to material harmful to minors  Education for minors about appropriate online behavior
    12. 12. COPPA Websites that collect information from children under the age of thirteen are required to comply with the Federal Trade Commission Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. COPPA applies to websites and apps that are directed to children under 13. Most of the apps we’ll talk about are intended for 13+ or 17+.
    13. 13. Privacy Rules 13
    14. 14. What has Changed?  Passing notes = Texting / Chatting  Buying CDs = Downloading music  Playing board games = Online gaming  Writing in a journal = Blogging  Talking on the Phone = Video Conference
    15. 15. Scale Everything takes place before a vast audience “15 minutes of fame” You don’t know who will see your information
    16. 16. YourTeen’s Digital Footprint Nothing ever truly disappears in the digital world, and everything you post on social media shapes people's impression of you. The impression that you give on social media and the Internet is often called your Digital Footprint.

What impression are you giving? Are you happy with your Digital Footprint? And, if you aren't, what can you do to change it?
    17. 17. Explain that nothing is really private Set up privacy settings Keep passwords private Protecting Personal Privacy
    18. 18. Strategies to Help you Monitor your Teen’s Digital Footprint  Use privacy settings (and only use sites that have privacy settings). Check out Lifehacker.com for a guide to setting up privacy settings.  Keep track of accounts.  Don’t overshare. Includes sharing names, addresses, and other important information.  Use a search engine like Google to search your teen’s name and username(s).  Use a site like Spokeo or PeekYou to review what information is publicly available about your teen  Explore browser extensions that can limit capturing of personal information including disconnect.me, do no track me (abinery.com) as well as block cookies.
    19. 19.  Tips on Social Media
    20. 20. Use of Social Media  Social Media is now open at GHS  Great educational opportunity - social media has transformed the way we exchange information in the 21st century  YouTube - wealth of educational videos... allows for embracing a teachable moments  Facebook and Twitter used by GHS headmaster and Student activities to highlight points of pride  Students use of Facebook - created for classes to share information and discuss relevant topics  Skype and Google Hangouts - video chat enabled to allow for interviews and collaboration  Pinterest to highlight key pages
    21. 21. Talk to yourTeen  Review the apps your teen uses on their smartphone and the computer and talk about what information they gave to sign up for each account.  Talk about how what they posts is viewed by others and how it could affect them if it is seen by a college admissions office, military recruiter, or hiring manager.  Talk with your teen about how everything they do online combines to create their Digital Footprint.  Look at what your teen posts, blogs, and shares on the Internet (even the information they share “privately” can easily become public). Model and Share Positive Ways of Using Social Media:  Point out and share news stories and other information about positive and negative consequences of online behavior.  Explore online resources with your teen to discover more about the social media tools and apps they hear about and want to use.
    22. 22. Twitter Privacy Options & Settings  Twitter is a free "microblogging" and social networking site that allows users to post 140-character messages called “tweets.”  Users can keep their tweets private and approve individual followers. This is a potentially good way for teens to “get their feet wet” in social media.  Twitter is increasingly being used as a promotional tool for products and celebrities so limit your teen’s exposure to ads by keeping their Twitter circle among real friends.  Users can choose to post their location along with each Tweet— not a great idea for teens.  If your teen is ready for social media, Twitter can be used as an education tool as well as a social networking tool.
    23. 23. Facebook  Facebook is an online social network on which users can share status updates, pictures, and video.  Facebook updates its features frequently, which can change privacy settings—so if your teen is ready for Facebook, regularly check their privacy settings.  If your teen is ready for Facebook, check regularly to ensure they are “Friends” with only people they know in real life. Privacy Options & Settings
    24. 24. Privacy Settings Only Friends
    25. 25. Know your Lingo BRB - Be right back POS-parents over shoulder A/S/L - ??
    26. 26. Instagram  Instagram is a photo and video sharing social networking service.  If your teen is ready for Instagram, go through the privacy settings together and talk about what is (and is not) appropriate to share on social media.  Search results for graphic terms can include graphic pictures.  Instagram does have built in features to report inappropriate content, but your teen cannot “unsee” what they have seen. Privacy Options & Settings
    27. 27. Risky Online Decisions • “Friending” unknown people • Posting personal information • Embarrassing or harassing people • Talking about sex • Sending or posting provocative images • Sharing passwords with friends
    28. 28. Social Media in a Nutshell  Many social media sites are beneficial, necessary part of our society. Some are bad. The trick is to know the difference.  Sites for your Teen to avoid:  Anonymous – ability to send out texts or images anonymously.  Inexistent or weak privacy settings.  Tools that may be appropriate for the 17+ crowd.  Modeling, guiding, talking and teaching are the way to ensure teens understand the power of social media.
    29. 29.  Teaching Digital Citizenship Standard 4: Students practice responsible, legal, safe and ethical uses of information resources and technology. Enduring Understanding: There are rights and responsibilities associated with the use of information.
    30. 30. Teaching Digital Citizenship Curriculum Strand: Digital Citizenship includes instruction on the following:  Responsible and Ethical Use.  Online Safety  Media Awareness  K-8 - Responsible and ethical use taught through formally scheduled media classes as well as in the context of projects through “teachable moments”.  9-12 - program less formal but still emphasized throughout the curriculum. NOTE: As District moves forward with digital learning plan, further instruction on digital citizenship is planned.
    31. 31. Teaching Digital Citizenship: Resources  Responsible and ethical use - emphasis on plagiarism and helping students to give credit where credit is due - especially in 9th and 10th grade (Turn-it-in, Noodletools for online note- taking and citations)  Online Safety - focused on in the wellness curriculum that is taught over 4 years as well as other projects used as teachable moments.  Media awareness - becomes more of a focus in 11th and 12th grade - encouraging students to get a deeper understanding of where information comes from and the purpose behind individuals or agencies providing information. Students in 9-10th grade also provided with lessons on evaluating online resources using district-wide criteria.
    32. 32. Essential Skills and Positive Results
    33. 33. Tips toTake WithYou  Get involved  Learn about social media platforms with your teen  Investigate the social media your teen is using  Check and use privacy settings  Advise your teen about what content is appropriate to share  Delete and block inappropriate content
    34. 34. Resources GPS Virtual Library Resources – For quality research texts and digital tools. Mentioned in this presentation: Spokeo or PeekYou (Get picture of your teen’s digital footprint) Lifehacker.com (Guide on Privacy Settings) Disconnect.me and Abinery.com (limiting personal info)

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