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Supported	
  By
The	
  Digital	
  Health	
  Innovator’s	
  
Mini-­‐Handbook
By	
  Fard	
  Johnmar,	
  Digital	
  Health	
 ...
“A	
  CLEAR	
  FRAMEWORK	
  AND	
  EDUCATIONAL	
  PATHWAY”
“This is the best and most actionable of the 2016 trend reports...
3/40
SHARE	
  THIS	
  RESOURCE	
  WITH	
  OTHERS
HELP	
  ACCELERATE	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  
BY	
  SHARING	
...
4/40
DOWNLOAD	
  &	
  PRINT	
  THIS	
  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK
You can’t download this mini-handbook on SlideShare.
Access the PDF...
5/40
INNOVATING	
  IN	
  HEALTH	
  USING	
  DIGITAL?
THIS	
  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK	
  IS	
  FOR	
  YOU
Over the past five years, ...
PART	
  I:	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  FACTS,	
  FIGURES	
  AND	
  SCOPE 6/40
THE BASICS
PAST &
FUTURE
RATIONALE
1
2
3
NEXT ST...
I	
  -­‐	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  BASICS 7/40
“The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result.
He does not expect th...
8/40DEFINING	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH
WHAT	
  IS	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH?
Since about 2010, many have begun to use the term digit...
DIGITAL	
  HEALTH’S	
  GLOBAL	
  REACH 9/40
The	
  U.S.	
  IS	
  VIEWED	
  AS	
  A	
  GLOBAL	
  LEADER,	
  BUT	
  
OTHER	
...
Click Here to Register Today
(It's Free)
Enjoying This Mini-Handbook?
You'll Love Our New Seminar
II	
  -­‐	
  WHY	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH?	
  
“There is no force so powerful as an
idea whose time has come.”
Everett Dirksen...
DIGITAL	
  HEALTH’S	
  NUMBER	
  ONE	
  GOAL
ACHIEVING	
  THE	
  QUADRUPLE	
  AIM:	
  A	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  PRIORITY
D...
ARGUING	
  FOR	
  AND	
  AGAINST	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH
BOOST	
  YOUR	
  UNDERSTANDING	
  OF	
  THE	
  
DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
 ...
III	
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  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH’S	
  PAST,	
  PRESENT	
  AND	
  FUTURE	
  	
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“I like the dreams of the future bett...
DIGITAL	
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  INVESTMENT	
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DIGITAL	
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  HAS	
  RECEIVED	
  SIGNIFICANT	
  INVESTOR	
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A	
  NEW	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  ERA:	
  THE	
  AGE	
  OF	
  IMPLEMENTATION	
  
“After a year-long analysis of research, m...
EVENTS	
  FOCUSING	
  ON	
  HEALTH’S	
  DIGITAL	
  FUTURE	
   16/40
Health 2.0
produces annual
events in the United
States...
NEWS	
  SOURCES	
  FOCUSED	
  ON	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH’S	
  FUTURE 17/40
KEY	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH-­‐FOCUSED	
  NEWS	
  OUTL...
PART	
  II:	
  THE	
  ART	
  OF	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION 18/40
THE BASICS
PAST &
FUTURE
RATIONALE
1
2
3
NEXT STE...
IV	
  -­‐	
  TWO	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  FRAMEWORKS 19/40
“High achievement always takes place in the
framew...
GROWING	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATORS 20/40
A	
  UNIQUE	
  SYSTEM	
  THAT	
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INNOVATION	
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ASSESSING	
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EVALUATING	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  MATURITY	
...
V	
  -­‐	
  DEEP	
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  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  STRATEGY 22/40
“Success doesn't necessarily come from breakthrough ...
WHY	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  EXPOSURE	
  IS	
  VITAL 23/40
“The hype surrounding digital health
far outstrips...
WHY	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  EXPOSURE	
  IS	
  VITAL 24/40
The device uses Near Field
Communication technolog...
ALL	
  GREAT	
  INNOVATORS	
  STEAL	
  —	
  EARLY	
  AND	
  OFTEN 25/40
Basketball icon Kobe Bryant is a thief
— a proud t...
ALL	
  GREAT	
  INNOVATORS	
  STEAL	
  —	
  EARLY	
  AND	
  OFTEN 26/40
Non-artists commit bad theft
(plagiarizing, skimmi...
ALL	
  GREAT	
  INNOVATORS	
  STEAL	
  —	
  EARLY	
  AND	
  OFTEN 27/40
They’ve used this skill to:
• Improve their produc...
 DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  FAILING?	
  FIX	
  THIS	
  FIRST	
  	
   28/40
Fact 1: We live (mostly) in our own
hea...
 DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  INNOVATION	
  FAILING?	
  FIX	
  THIS	
  FIRST	
  	
   29/40
Why Should They Care?: Reality
check: N...
 A	
  HARD	
  TRUTH	
  ABOUT	
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   30/40
“There has been an awakening.
Have you f...
 A	
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   31/40
But, those interested in pushing
forward...
 A	
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  INNOVATION	
  	
  	
   32/40
There’s a lot more that goes into
conque...
LET’S	
  STOP	
  WASTING	
  TIME	
  &	
  MONEY	
  IN	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  	
  	
   33/40
When it comes to delivering di...
LET’S	
  STOP	
  WASTING	
  TIME	
  &	
  MONEY	
  IN	
  DIGITAL	
  HEALTH	
  	
  	
   34/40
At its core embedment is all a...
LET’S	
  STOP	
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  MONEY	
  IN	
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  HEALTH	
  	
  	
   35/40
Since then, I’ve taught divers...
VI	
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  ASSESS	
  &	
  MASTER	
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  INNOVATION 36/40
“In doing everything, from coming up with the ...
READING	
  THIS	
  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK	
  iS	
  ONLY	
  THE	
  FIRST	
  STEP,	
  
THE	
  NEXT	
  IS	
  TAKING	
  ACTION
WHAT’S...
38/40
ABOUT	
  THE	
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The Digital Health Innovator's Mini-Handbook

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Download: http://digihealth.info/handbook
This valuable industry-first publication provides essential insights, analysis and strategies designed to help accelerate digital innovation in health.

Published in: Technology

The Digital Health Innovator's Mini-Handbook

  1. 1. Supported  By The  Digital  Health  Innovator’s   Mini-­‐Handbook By  Fard  Johnmar,  Digital  Health  Futurist,  Strategist  and  Researcher  
  2. 2. “A  CLEAR  FRAMEWORK  AND  EDUCATIONAL  PATHWAY” “This is the best and most actionable of the 2016 trend reports out today. The 'Digital Health Innovator's Mini-Handbook' gives my professional New Year's resolutions greater focus, especially through the lens of the Quadruple Aim that needs to drive digital health going forward. We're all here to improve patients' lives, and this mini-handbook provides a clear framework and educational pathway to structure and prioritize what I can do to make a difference. With this guide, individual executives can chart their own course and make a bigger impact on both patient outcomes and provider quality-of-life in 2016 and beyond.” -Croom Lawrence, Digital Leader & Client Partner, Merkle Health “A  TREMENDOUSLY  HELPFUL  RESOURCE” “I found the mini-handbook to be a tremendously helpful resource in terms of improving understanding some of the issues supporting the need to keep pace with, participate in and even lead digital health innovation. It will be interesting to observe and assess outcomes over the next 10 years.” -Joanne Thomas, PhD, LPC, President and CEO, Central Illinois Agency on Aging, Inc. 2/40 HIGH  PRAISE  FOR  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK
  3. 3. 3/40 SHARE  THIS  RESOURCE  WITH  OTHERS HELP  ACCELERATE  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION   BY  SHARING  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK   Click the icons below to get started.
  4. 4. 4/40 DOWNLOAD  &  PRINT  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK You can’t download this mini-handbook on SlideShare. Access the PDF of this publication by visiting the Digital Health Maven Project’s Website. In addition to downloading this valuable resource you’ll receive additional free innovation tools, news and insights and much more. Click the button at the left to get started. (Or visit http:// digihealth.info/handbook) HOW  TO  DOWNLOAD  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK Click Here to Download This Mini-Handbook
  5. 5. 5/40 INNOVATING  IN  HEALTH  USING  DIGITAL? THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK  IS  FOR  YOU Over the past five years, digital health has exploded into prominence. Billions are being invested in this sector and individuals, organizations and others are working hard to develop new solutions for the most difficult problems in global health. As a nearly 20-year health industry veteran, I’ve played a role in digital health’s evolution and witnessed many issues that have blocked progress, caused frustration and stifled growth. (Learn about me by clicking here.) But, because digital health is still a very new field, there are few publications that people can use to proactively identify innovation-related issues, quickly locate educational resources and much more. I developed this mini-handbook to satisfy this unmet need. This publication is part of the Digital Health Maven Project, a global initiative I launched in 2014. The project is designed to provide medical professionals, executives, entrepreneurs and others like you with knowledge, skills, and tools that will help you innovate successfully using digital technologies. Learn more about the project by clicking here. As you read this publication, I’m sure you’ll think of issues I haven’t addressed or resources I’ve failed to mention. That’s okay. I plan to update this mini-handbook annually with new tools, insights and resources. If you have suggestions about what should be included in future editions, please get in touch. The most important thing you can do with this mini-handbook is take action on what you learn and share this resource with others. To your success! WHY  I  DEVELOPED  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK FardJohnmar DigitalHealthFuturist & AuthorofThis Mini-Handbook Hint: Click this icon throughout the mini- handbook to access additional insights, resources and tools online.
  6. 6. PART  I:  DIGITAL  HEALTH  FACTS,  FIGURES  AND  SCOPE 6/40 THE BASICS PAST & FUTURE RATIONALE 1 2 3 NEXT STEPS FRAMEWORK STRATEGY 4 6 5 In Part I of this mini-handbook you’ll learn how to define digital health and why it’s important. We’ll also cover digital health’s past and future — from growing investor interest in this sector to how it will have a major global impact over the next 10 years.
  7. 7. I  -­‐  DIGITAL  HEALTH  BASICS 7/40 “The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter — for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way.” Nikola Tesla “The digital world has been in a separate orbit from our medical cocoon, and it's time the boundaries be taken down.” Eric Topol
  8. 8. 8/40DEFINING  DIGITAL  HEALTH WHAT  IS  DIGITAL  HEALTH? Since about 2010, many have begun to use the term digital health to refer to how a range of computing and data technologies and devices are being used to track, improve, support and modify health. Key digital health tools include mobile, social media, genomics, data analytics, sensors, wearables and the Web. In Wikipedia, digital health is defined as: “the convergence of the digital and genomic revolutions with health, healthcare, living, and society. Digital health is empowering people to better track, manage, and improve their own and their family’s health, live better, more productive lives, and improve society. It’s also helping to reduce inefficiencies in healthcare delivery, improve access, reduce costs, increase quality, and make medicine more personalized and precise.” - Click Here to View Visions of Digital Health Medicine 2064, Daniel Kraft, MD Defining Digital Health, Paul Sonnier
  9. 9. DIGITAL  HEALTH’S  GLOBAL  REACH 9/40 The  U.S.  IS  VIEWED  AS  A  GLOBAL  LEADER,  BUT   OTHER  COUNTRIES  ARE  BECOMING   ENGINES  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION Over the last several years, people, businesses, organizations and governments in Europe, the Americas and Asia have begun to invest human and financial resources into spurring digital health innovation. Here are just a few of the countries that are making major strides in digital health. DIGITAL  HEALTH INNOVATION  IN  THE   DEVELOPING  WORLD For many years, innovators in developing countries have been experimenting with digital technologies — especially mobile — in unique ways. Fewer resources sometimes translates into opportunity as innovators are able to deploy digital tools quickly to solve local and national health problems in India, throughout Africa, Southeast Asia and other regions of the world. See the Deloitte report, “Connected health: How digital technology is transforming health and social care” to learn more. Click here for a listing of online resources you can use to learn more about digital health’s global evolution.
  10. 10. Click Here to Register Today (It's Free) Enjoying This Mini-Handbook? You'll Love Our New Seminar
  11. 11. II  -­‐  WHY  DIGITAL  HEALTH?   “There is no force so powerful as an idea whose time has come.” Everett Dirksen “There are two great days in a person's life — the day we are born and the day we discover why.” William Barclay 10/40
  12. 12. DIGITAL  HEALTH’S  NUMBER  ONE  GOAL ACHIEVING  THE  QUADRUPLE  AIM:  A  DIGITAL  HEALTH  PRIORITY Digital health technologies will ultimately be judged on whether they lead to significant improvements in global health while ensuring both consumers and clinicians benefit in ways that are aligned with the “quadruple aim,” which is outlined below. Who  Introduced  the  Quadruple  Aim? Drs. Thomas Bodenheimer and Christine Sinsky introduced the concept of the quadruple aim in a 2014 essay published in the Annals of Family Medicine. This was due to their observation that provider burnout and intense dissatisfaction may lead to lower patient satisfaction, reduced health outcomes and higher costs. They suggest that improving the “work life of health care providers” could help solve this problem. Click here to read this important essay. 11/40 Primary  Goal   Improve Population Health Secondary  Goal   Improve the Patient Experience Secondary  Goal   Reduce Health Costs Secondary  Goal   Improve Health Providers’ Work Life THE  QUADRUPLE  AIM
  13. 13. ARGUING  FOR  AND  AGAINST  DIGITAL  HEALTH BOOST  YOUR  UNDERSTANDING  OF  THE   DIGITAL  HEALTH  REVOLUTION’S  PROS  AND  CONS   Over the past few years, a number of books have appeared that provide an overview of the evolving world of digital health and its current and potential impact. Below are some of the most well-known books that will help you understand the benefits and drawbacks of the digital health revolution. The Digital Doctor Robert Wachter The Guide to the Future of Medicine Bertalan Meskó The Patient Will See You Now Eric Topol Where Does it Hurt? Jonathan Bush 12/40 “ePatient 2015” explains how digital technologies, history, legislation, and culture are combining to rapidly transform health. Click the image below to learn more about the trends covered in the book. ePatient 2015 Fard Johnmar, Rohit Bhargava “The Digital Doctor” examines healthcare at the dawn of its computer age and asks whether technology has been helpful or harmful. “The Patient Will See You Now” shows how technology can aid medicine and improve health experiences and outcomes. The “Future of Medicine” looks at key technological trends that are shaping health. “Where Does it Hurt?” focuses on how innovation can disrupt the status quo in health and give patients more control and better care experiences.
  14. 14. III  -­‐  DIGITAL  HEALTH’S  PAST,  PRESENT  AND  FUTURE     13/40 “I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.” Thomas Jefferson “History never looks like history when you are living through it.” John W. Gardner
  15. 15. DIGITAL  HEALTH  INVESTMENT  TRENDS 14/40 DIGITAL  HEALTH  HAS  RECEIVED  SIGNIFICANT  INVESTOR  ATTENTION Although they use different data collection and analysis methodologies, both Rock Health and StartUp Health have published data indicating that digital health firms are receiving significant investor attention. Total funds raised by firms increased between 2010 and 2014. Although total funding was flat (or declined) year-to-year, in 2015 a number of digital health companies such as Fitbit entered the public markets, raising $1.4 billion in five IPOs, according to Rock Health. Sources: >StartUp Health: Insights Report: 2015 Year End - Click Here to View >Rock Health: Digital Health Funding: 2015 Year in Review - Click Here to View 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 N/A $1.1B $1.9B $2.4B $3.0B $7.0B $5.8B $1.1B $1.5B $2.0B $4.3B $4.5B
  16. 16. A  NEW  DIGITAL  HEALTH  ERA:  THE  AGE  OF  IMPLEMENTATION   “After a year-long analysis of research, market events, innovation activity and other indicators contained in our growing archive of more than 500,000 data points, I’ve come to recognize that a shift has occurred in how digital health is viewed. People are focusing less on the possible and more on the probable in digital health. I call this new era the Age of Implementation. This will be characterized by organizations asking (and seeking to answer) a basic question: What’s the best way to implement digital solutions so that they truly have an impact on the quadruple aim: improved health outcomes, lower costs, better patient experiences and clinician satisfaction?” -Fard THE  AGES  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH Learn more about the Age of Implementation and digital health’s past, present and future by attending our popular on-demand Webinar, “Understanding and Succeeding in Digital Health's New Age.” Click here to register. WEBINAR 15/40
  17. 17. EVENTS  FOCUSING  ON  HEALTH’S  DIGITAL  FUTURE   16/40 Health 2.0 produces annual events in the United States, Europe, Asia and other regions focusing on health technology. THESE  INNOVATION-­‐PACKED   EVENTS  WILL  HELP  IMPROVE   YOUR  UNDERSTANDING  OF   DIGITAL  HEALTH’S  FUTURE Each year, thousands of people from around the world attend these major annual events to be exposed to the latest innovations in digital health. Here are a few to consider attending in 2016 or in the future. CES has become a global showcase for new consumer- focused digital health technologies, including wearables. HIMSS is a major conference focusing on health technology innovations and implementation. Stanford Medicine X focuses on highlighting new technologies and their impact on health — especially patients. SXSW Interactive features new innovations in a range of industries, and has had a major focus on health (in recent years). Exponential Medicine provides education, demos and talks about health’s digital future from a cross-disciplinary perspective. For information about other global digital health events, please click here.
  18. 18. NEWS  SOURCES  FOCUSED  ON  DIGITAL  HEALTH’S  FUTURE 17/40 KEY  DIGITAL  HEALTH-­‐FOCUSED  NEWS  OUTLETS,  PODCASTS  &     VIDEO  SERIES     A growing array of experts, journalists and others are providing insightful coverage of the global digital health landscape. Here are some well worth visiting and following. • MobiHealth News: Click Here to Read • HIT Consultant: Click Here to Read • KQED Future of You: Click Here to Read • Wareable: Click Here to Read • WT VOX: Click Here to Read • MIT Technology Review: Click Here to Read NEWS • The Tech Tonics Podcast: Click Here to Listen • StartUp Health NOW: Click Here to View • The Doctor Weighs In: Click Here to View • Healthcare Tech Talk: Click Here to Listen • The Medical Futurist: Click Here to View • Relentless Health Value: Click Here to Listen PODCASTS  &  VIDEOS DIGIHEALTH  INFORMER:  A  PREMIUM  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INTELLIGENCE  PLATFORM   Part of the Digital Health Maven Project, leaders from firms like Roche, the American Medical Association and Johnson & Johnson rely on DigiHealth Informer’s daily intelligence briefings, growing database of more than .5 million data points and other resources to stay informed and ahead. Click here to learn more.
  19. 19. PART  II:  THE  ART  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION 18/40 THE BASICS PAST & FUTURE RATIONALE 1 2 3 NEXT STEPS FRAMEWORK STRATEGY 4 5 6 In Part II of this mini-handbook you’ll learn about two frameworks that can help accelerate individual and organizational digital innovation. You’ll also benefit from five essays that provide deep digital health strategy — from the benefits of stealing great ideas to how poor communication kills innovation.
  20. 20. IV  -­‐  TWO  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  FRAMEWORKS 19/40 “High achievement always takes place in the framework of high expectation.” Charles Kettering “Language is not simply a reporting device for experience but a defining framework for it.” Benjamin Whorf
  21. 21. GROWING  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATORS 20/40 A  UNIQUE  SYSTEM  THAT  SUPPORTS   INNOVATION  AT  THE  INDIVIDUAL  LEVEL   “Over the last 10 years, I’ve encountered (and worked with) executives, medical professionals, entrepreneurs and others who recognize the need to think and act in innovative ways, but don’t know the best way to proceed. In addition, leaders at many organizations are seeking to improve individuals’ and teams’ ability to find, recognize and implement innovative digital solutions. But, they are struggling to meet this objective. To help, I developed the Digital Health Maven Growth System. It is informed by years of research into why top-performing individuals succeed where others fail. The system is designed to help people excel by learning and practicing the habits of what I call digital health mavens. These are: • Cultivate curiosity • Pursue insights about digital health • Put humans (customers, patients) first • Embrace flexibility (willingness to change direction) • Practice bravery (by running toward, rather than away from, innovation and novelty) Since 2014, outputs informed by the system have helped innovators, leaders, executives and entrepreneurs from around the world.” -Fard The free “Guide to Embracing Your Inner Digital Health Maven” is a must-have resource that will help you learn and apply the growth system. Click here to learn more.
  22. 22. ASSESSING  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  MATURITY 21/40 EVALUATING  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  MATURITY  IS  CRITICAL   “There are two pressing questions that must be answered by innovators inside and outside of organizations about implementing digital health solutions: • For organizations: Do we have the capacity to understand, develop and execute these innovations? • For startups, health tech firms and others: Which potential clients/partners are most suited to comprehend and utilize the innovations we are developing? To help answer these questions, I developed an industry-first maturity framework called the Digital Health Innovation Integration Curve. It takes into account four fundamental forces that impact digital health innovation in order to provide an easy-to-understand and communicate assessment of innovation readiness and other factors.” -Fard Did you know that you can evaluate your (or your partners’/clients’) digital health innovation maturity in about 5-10 minutes? Participate in the State of Digital Health Innovation 2016 study. After completing an online survey you’ll receive a 7+ page report with actionable insights and more. Click here to get started.
  23. 23. V  -­‐  DEEP  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  STRATEGY 22/40 “Success doesn't necessarily come from breakthrough innovation but from flawless execution. A great strategy alone won't win a game or a battle; the win comes from basic blocking and tackling.” Naveen Jain “The biggest risk is not taking any risk ... In a world that changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.” Mark Zuckerberg “The following pages feature a series of essays I developed in early 2016 providing insights and guidance about critical digital health innovation- related issues. They’ve received great reviews so I’ve included them in this handbook in the hopes that you’ll find them useful as well.” -Fard
  24. 24. WHY  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  EXPOSURE  IS  VITAL 23/40 “The hype surrounding digital health far outstrips its actual impact.” This is a common complaint of physicians, executives and others about technologies such as wearables and mobile. Yet, slowly but surely, as innovators around the world are coming up with creative ways to use these digital tools, they having a big impact on health — and even saving lives. Take the example of infant mortality. It is estimated that more than 1 million babies die from premature birth each year — many in the developing world. In some cases, these deaths are caused by a simple lack of information. People — especially those living in remote locations — don’t have access to the type of content and data that can DIGITAL  HEALTH  TRAILBLAZERS:  SAVING  LIVES  WITH  TECHNOLOGY help them make better decisions and improve care. Fortunately, there are many innovators around the world using mobile, wearables and other technologies to solve the information problem contributing to infant mortality. Here are two. Using Mobile to Identify At-Risk Babies Researchers at the University of Nottingham are combining mobile with Big Data to prevent deaths due to low birth weight. They have developed a mobile app that uses the device’s camera to take pictures of babies’ faces, feet and ears. This information is automatically uploaded to a growing database and analyzed to identify at-risk babies. Village elders and midwives can use this mobile app to make the critical decision about whether they can simply provide nutritional advice to new mothers, or need to recommend a visit to a hospital — which can be hundreds of miles away — to seek treatment for their babies. A Smart Necklace Provides Vital Infant Immunization Data Khushi Baby was one of two winners of the UNICEF Wearables for Good Challenge, which was launched in May 2015. Developed by innovators at Yale, the Khushi Baby necklace stores electronic health data, including critical immunization information for children. (Cont.)
  25. 25. WHY  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  EXPOSURE  IS  VITAL 24/40 The device uses Near Field Communication technology to send and receive information via mobile devices. Healthcare workers operating in remote locations can scan the necklace using a mobile device and send and receive critical vaccination data without having to access a central database. Obviously, this concept can be expanded to provide an inexpensive and reliable method of storing and sending critical health and medical data in other areas of health and could become a vital tool for health professionals operating in remote locations globally. Focused on Innovation? Understanding the Work of Digital Health Trailblazers is Vital Time and time again in my career I’ve witnessed the power of DIGITAL  HEALTH  TRAILBLAZERS:  SAVING  LIVES  WITH  TECHNOLOGY exposing innovators, executives, medical professionals and others to new ideas and concepts in digital health. I’ve seen them use this information to transform their thinking, make new connections and solve difficult problems. This is why I regularly share stories like the ones outlined above in my masterclasses, essays, lectures and presentations. It’s important to constantly seek opportunities to learn from the best in digital health. What you learn may have a direct impact on your work in a startup, as an innovator within an organization or elsewhere. Where to find this vital information? The knowledge resources referenced in this mini-handbook are a great place to start. Written by Fard Johnmar, January 2016
  26. 26. ALL  GREAT  INNOVATORS  STEAL  —  EARLY  AND  OFTEN 25/40 Basketball icon Kobe Bryant is a thief — a proud thief. Why? Well, stealing only helped make him one of the most celebrated and accomplished basketball players of all time. In his book, “Steal Like an Artist,” Austin Kleon said this about Bryant: “[he] has admitted that all of his moves on the court were stolen from watching tapes of his heroes. But initially, when Bryant stole a lot of those moves, he realized he couldn’t completely pull them off because he didn’t have the same body type as the guys he was thieving from. He had to adapt the moves to make them his own.” KOBE  BRYANT  IS  A  THIEF  (AND  YOU  SHOULD  BE  ONE  TOO) Making their moves his own. This is a crucial point. If Bryant simply tried to imitate the greats, it’s likely we would have never heard of him. But, as Kleon notes in his book, instead of simply imitating, he emulated, incorporating the moves and techniques of legends like Michael Jordan into his unique playing style. Imitating others to learn what they know and transforming their techniques into something that’s unique and special to you is at the essence of what Kleon calls stealing like an artist. Stealing like an artist is an innovation skill that’s especially important in digital health. Here’s why. Stealing Like an Artist to Accelerate Digital Health Innovation Source: Austin Kleon, “Steal Like an Artist” In “Steal Like an Artist,” Kleon developed a great illustration outlining what he calls good and bad theft (see above). (Cont.)
  27. 27. ALL  GREAT  INNOVATORS  STEAL  —  EARLY  AND  OFTEN 26/40 Non-artists commit bad theft (plagiarizing, skimming, etc.). Artists look for every opportunity to engage in good theft (honoring, transforming and remixing). All innovators are (or should be) artists. After all, aren’t they creating, reimagining and bringing new ideas to life? It should come as no surprise that the best artists in digital health steal very, very well. Take the example of Leon DesRoches, founder of SmartPods (disclosure: I’m working with SmartPods via a digital health innovation initiative developed by the Canadian government). People are beginning to recognize that sitting too much may be as harmful as smoking. Because of this, KOBE  BRYANT  IS  A  THIEF  (AND  YOU  SHOULD  BE  ONE  TOO) standing desks are all the rage today. But, DesRoches wasn’t content to just imitate others by creating a typical standing desk. Instead, he carefully studied wearables, data analytics and wellness and remixed ideas from all these worlds into his unique product: SmartPods. The platform is an “automated workstation that encourages users to move throughout the day by tracking and monitoring movement, calorie expenditure, and delivers personalized wellness programs.” Most importantly, SmartPods requires no user input and effectively uses data from wearables and other sources to invisibly optimize health. DesRoches’ SmartPods story illustrates what it means to steal like an artist in order to create unique technology solutions for the most difficult problems in health. Learning How to Steal Like an Artist Is it possible to learn how to steal like an artist in digital health? Absolutely. It all comes down to developing the ability to examine digital innovations around you, quickly understand what makes them tick and successfully apply what you learn to refine your work. One way I’ve helped people is by teaching them a unique method that allows them deconstruct any digital health solution in about 15 minutes. (Cont.)
  28. 28. ALL  GREAT  INNOVATORS  STEAL  —  EARLY  AND  OFTEN 27/40 They’ve used this skill to: • Improve their products or services • Immediately understand the strengths and weaknesses of potential competitors, find new collaboration or client opportunities, hone their own innovations and much more. My experience as a composer informed the development of this technique. In particular, breaking down music into its fundamental components in order to reproduce, remix and perform it. Later in this handbook, you’ll learn how you can work with me directly to learn and apply this skill. Steal Like an Artist, Austin Kleon Read This Book KOBE  BRYANT  IS  A  THIEF  (AND  YOU  SHOULD  BE  ONE  TOO) Written by Fard Johnmar, January 2016
  29. 29.  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  FAILING?  FIX  THIS  FIRST     28/40 Fact 1: We live (mostly) in our own heads. Fact 2: Generally, we think we express ourselves clearly. Fact 3: We fail to communicate well more often than we’d like. This is a big problem for everyone — including those in the digital health innovation arena. You see, as an innovator it’s your (difficult and time-consuming) job to convince others to believe in your vision, your approach, your technology. Just how much time do we spend trying to persuade others? A lot. Consider this data from a global survey featured in Daniel Pink’s excellent book, “To Sell is Human.” THE  GUARANTEED  INNOVATION  KILLER:  POOR  COMMUNICATION “People are now spending about 40 percent of their time at work engaged in non-sales selling … persuading, influencing, and convincing others in ways that don’t involve anyone making a purchase. Across a range of professions, we are devoting roughly twenty-four minutes of every hour to moving others [emphasis mine].” Wow. I’m convinced that digital health innovators spend 45 – 55 minutes every hour trying to persuade others (if you include sales-related conversations). The stakes are high. If you can’t speak (either in writing or in person) clearly and powerfully: • No one will collaborate • No one will invest • No one will buy • No one will become part of your tribe • No one will care Here’s another fact: powerful communicators are made — not born. It takes time and practice to learn how to speak and write in ways that convince and convert. Many are looking for advice about how to improve their communications skills. To help, I’ve provided four questions you can ask (and answer) that will get you speaking and writing better — about anything. Who Are You Speaking To?: You can’t please everyone, so don’t try. Decide who matters most and figure out how to communicate in ways that capture their attention. (Cont.)
  30. 30.  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION  FAILING?  FIX  THIS  FIRST     29/40 Why Should They Care?: Reality check: No one cares about you. They care about themselves. How will your innovation, method, idea, etc. make their life more wonderful? Explain this and people will pay attention — at the very least. Have You Practiced Enough?: Revising your writing, presentations, etc. is a form of practice. Each time you add or subtract something, you’re practicing how to become a better communicator. Steve Jobs gave fantastic talks. Why? Partly because he practiced — a lot. Can You Accept Imperfection?: Live with the fact that you’re never going to be perfect. Don’t let the fear of imperfection keep you from telling people about the wonderful work you’re doing. Oftentimes your audience will help you communicate better — either by ignoring you, THE  GUARANTEED  INNOVATION  KILLER:  POOR  COMMUNICATION providing feedback (or looking confused). Of course, there’s a lot more that goes into improving your communications skills than what I’ve outlined above. Later in this mini-handbook, I’ll provide you with information about how you can get help in your efforts to communicate persuasively and confidently in the context of digital health innovation. Written by Fard Johnmar, January 2016
  31. 31.  A  HARD  TRUTH  ABOUT  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION       30/40 “There has been an awakening. Have you felt it? The Dark Side, and the Light.” These were the first words spoken in the now famous initial trailer released by Disney for the record- breaking film, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” Some in the media wondered: What’s the Dark Side? Isn’t there just, the Force? But, Star Wars fans know that there always has been an acknowledgment, in the movies and other properties, that the Force has two sides. One’s great, the other … not so much. The same can be said for innovation. The majority of commentary about innovation tends to focus on its light, positive side — especially in CONQUERING  THE  DARK  SIDE  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION digital health. Innovation will bring transformative, disruptive, revolutionary changes to health! But just like the Force, there’s another side to innovation. It can be dark, depressing, lonely and scary. I get emails and phone calls all the time from people who tell me things like this related to digital health innovation: • “I’ve been scarred from my innovation experience.” • “The system is hostile to innovation.” • “I tried to launch XX innovation and it blew up in my face.” • “Leadership pays lip service to innovation, but doesn’t really want to do it.” • “People are more interested in keeping their heads down and doing their jobs than rocking the boat.” These comments are representative of the dark side of innovation. It’s a frustration that’s caused by people, processes — and yes, politics — that prevents innovation from progressing. Plainly speaking, it sucks being stuck and getting angry about it is a natural response. When faced with the dark side of innovation, people often have two reactions: quit, or keep going. Many quit. And, that’s okay. (Cont.)
  32. 32.  A  HARD  TRUTH  ABOUT  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION       31/40 But, those interested in pushing forward often have a single question: How can I, we, us, get unstuck? In my nearly 20-year health industry career, I’ve faced the dark side of innovation more times than I can count. I (and others) have developed a strategy for overcoming it. There are four components to this approach, focusing on the mind (emotion), body, spirit and logic. Here’s a quick overview of what I mean. Tame the emotional mind: As innovators we tend to put our all into the projects we launch and implement. This stuff really matters! But, when it comes to working with other people around our innovations, it’s important to remember that others’ reactions to CONQUERING  THE  DARK  SIDE  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION the work — whether good or bad — has nothing to do with us. It’s all about them. Practicing not taking things personally helps to provide a sense of needed perspective and emotional distance. This enables us to identify roadblocks and obstacles and steadily work to overcome them — if possible. Work the body: Exercise is critical for innovators. It relieves stress, releases positive endorphins and much more. For example, when I’m angry, it’s very therapeutic to punch a bag for 45 minutes. Whatever you have to do, whether it’s walking, swimming, cycling or hiking, take time most days to work the body. It’s an essential coping mechanism. Focus on the spirit: If you have conviction about what you’re doing and believe in it 150%, it’s easier to deal with setbacks — even when you have to walk away. As innovators it’s important to think deeply about why you’re doing what you’re doing. Meditation can help. But even taking time to think while engaging in mindless activities like washing the dishes helps. Doing this daily will bolster your spirit and make you more resilient. Engage the logical mind: If you take time to think about it, you likely have a sense of what’s preventing your innovation activities from moving forward. Taming the emotional mind will help to activate the logical mind, which is informed by instinct and experience. And, it’s even better if you have a framework that will help you identify the forces that inhibit or accelerate innovation in the digital health arena to guide your thinking. (Cont.)
  33. 33.  A  HARD  TRUTH  ABOUT  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION       32/40 There’s a lot more that goes into conquering the dark side of digital health innovation. This is why I work to help people get unstuck by identifying (and overcoming) essential innovation roadblocks. Many times I focus on aiding people’s logical mind. I do this by teaching people the four fundamental forces that make or break digital health innovation. They learn how to quickly identify and assess whether these forces are aiding or blocking their progress. Later in this handbook you’ll learn how you can work with me directly to overcome innovation roadblocks. CONQUERING  THE  DARK  SIDE  OF  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION Written by Fard Johnmar, January 2016 Watch This 1st Trailer, Star Wars: The Force Awakens
  34. 34. LET’S  STOP  WASTING  TIME  &  MONEY  IN  DIGITAL  HEALTH       33/40 When it comes to delivering digital solutions in health are we pursuing a strategy that’s costing us billions in wasted time, money and resources? There’s plenty of evidence the answer is yes. In january 2016, Accenture released a surprising study revealing that while the majority of the top 100 U.S. hospitals offer mobile health apps to patients, only 2% use them. Accenture also determined that failing to “focus apps on services consumers want most (emphasis mine) could cost hospitals more than $100 million a year in lost revenue.” In a widely cited Endeavour Partners study released in 2014, the firm found that “while one in 10 U.S. [adult] consumers [owns an activity FIXING  THE  FLAWED  STRATEGY  THAT’S  COSTING  US  BILLIONS tracker] one-third stopped using it within six months.” In the corporate wellness arena, experts are warning that the widely used strategy of simply handing people Fitbits (or other devices) and expecting them to thrive is the wrong approach. According to Forbes, corporate wellness veteran and Sonic Boom co-founder Danna Korn said that giving employees devices with no personalization will “motivate the healthy [people] but is completely irrelevant to the less- engaged employees who are not encouraged emotionally, mentally, or socially.” When you consider the $100 million figure cited by Accenture, the costs associated with technology development and deployment, lost productivity and more, the strategy of simply handing out technology and expecting people to benefit from it is likely costing us billions. The problem boils down to this: in health technology we’ve been traditionally focused on boosting engagement. But, that’s really hard to do if technologies are not relevant, useful, well-designed and aligned with people’s needs and expectations. But, there’s another way. It has everything to do with a behavior change secret noted Stanford professor BJ Fogg revealed to me during a podcast I recorded with him last year. What’s the key to success? Fogg says: Help people do what they want. Not what they don’t. In 2014, I introduced a strategy to fix the engagement problem called embedment. (Cont.)
  35. 35. LET’S  STOP  WASTING  TIME  &  MONEY  IN  DIGITAL  HEALTH       34/40 At its core embedment is all about integrating digital health technologies and tools into the framework of people’s lives and work. This means building solutions that fit the following criteria. Invisible: Limit the time people have to spend actively interacting with a technology. Collect data passively and anticipate their needs. Integrated: Make sure technology is designed to fit within users’ lifestyles, backgrounds and even culture. We conducted research in 2013 revealing that the majority of digitally savvy consumers place a high value on using health technology solutions that are relevant to their needs and wants. This means technology should be developed to align with people’s life and workflows. Simply air dropping a technology solution into a FIXING  THE  FLAWED  STRATEGY  THAT’S  COSTING  US  BILLIONS population and expecting people to adopt it is not a sound strategy. Currently, a number of companies are using the embedment strategy to solve the engagement problem. Some of them include are listed below. Medivizor, which is having great success using data pulled from patient surveys, electronic medical records and other sources to deliver highly relevant (and concise) health information exactly when patients need it. Atlas Wearables, which has developed a next-generation fitness device that automatically logs users’ exercise routines (no manual tracking required) and uses this information to optimize form and fitness. Welltok is using IBM’s Watson to power its CafeWell Concierge app, which delivers “highly relevant health recommendations that are individualized, timely, geographically appropriate and more.” Designing Digital Health Interventions With “the 2Cs” in Mind After introducing the embedment strategy, I reached out directly to companies like Walgreens to better understand exactly how they deliver digital solutions (and why they have been successful). These interviews and in-depth conversations led me to understand that companies that had solved the engagement problem were using techniques associated with something I call the “2 Cs.” (Cont.)
  36. 36. LET’S  STOP  WASTING  TIME  &  MONEY  IN  DIGITAL  HEALTH       35/40 Since then, I’ve taught diverse audiences about the 2 Cs and recommended it to digital health innovation leaders at large organizations and startups. In some cases I’ve presented detailed case studies that provide unique insights about how technology solutions are designed and delivered to fit, almost invisibly, into the lives and workflows of patients, physicians and others. In the next section of this handbook, I’ll show you where you can learn more about the 2 Cs in order to build digital health solutions that are used — and loved. FIXING  THE  FLAWED  STRATEGY  THAT’S  COSTING  US  BILLIONS Written by Fard Johnmar, January 2016
  37. 37. VI  -­‐  ASSESS  &  MASTER  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION 36/40 “In doing everything, from coming up with the ideas and putting them on paper till doing the final edits, you are always thinking the next three steps, you're always thinking what next, what next, what next? Andrew McCarthy “Successful people maintain a positive focus in life no matter what is going on around them. They stay focused on their past successes rather than their past failures, and on the next action steps they need to take to get them closer to the fulfillment of their goals rather than all the other distractions that life presents to them.” Jack Canfield
  38. 38. READING  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK  iS  ONLY  THE  FIRST  STEP,   THE  NEXT  IS  TAKING  ACTION WHAT’S  NEXT?   37/40 “Thank you for reading this mini-handbook. As you’ve seen, there are many tools, resources and insights — within and without this publication — that you can use to accelerate your digital health innovation efforts. I encourage you to refer to this publication often and share it with friends and colleagues. There are two additional ways you can take action on what you’ve learned. Assess your (or the organizations you work with) progress in digital health innovation to identify strengths, weaknesses and much more. In addition, you’re invited to attend my Digital Health Innovation Success Masterclass. This is a unique online experience that will aid your innovation activities and address many of the issues I discussed in the essays featured previously in this mini-handbook. Please see below for information about how to get started.” -Fard Click Here to Evaluate Your Digital Health Innovation Progress, Identify Strengths and More Click Here to Learn New Skills, How to Overcome Innovation Obstacles and More
  39. 39. 38/40 ABOUT  THE  DIGITAL  HEALTH  MAVEN  PROJECT   A  UNIQUE  GLOBAL  INITIATIVE     The Digital Health Maven Project delivers research, education, events, training and more to help executives, entrepreneurs, medical professionals and others innovate in health successfully using digital tools and technologies. It is powered by Enspektos, a globally respected innovation consultancy. Over the last 10 years, we have helped people like you understand, innovate and excel in digital health using original research, unique technologies, non-obvious insights and more. Learn more about the Digital Health Maven Project at www.digitalhealthmaven.com and Enspektos by visiting www.enspektos.com.
  40. 40. LEARN  ABOUT  OUR  SPONSORS   A  BIG  THANK  YOU  TO  OUR  SPONSORS This publication (and the Digital Health Maven Project) are made possible, in part, by the support of our generous sponsors who share our passion for igniting innovation globally with digital tools and technologies. Please support their work by visiting their Websites and getting in contact if your needs align with their capabilities. See below for more information. VALIDIC Validic provides the industry’s leading digital health platform connecting providers, pharmaceutical companies, payers, wellness companies and healthcare IT vendors to health data gathered from hundreds in-home clinical devices, wearables and consumer healthcare applications. Reaching more than 160 million lives in 47 countries, its scalable, cloud-based solution offers one connection to a continuously-expanding ecosystem of consumer and clinical health data, delivering the standardized and actionable insight needed to drive better health outcomes and power improved population health, care coordination and patient engagement initiatives. Validic was named to Gartner’s “Cool Vendors” list and received Frost & Sullivan’s “Best Practices and Best Value in Healthcare Information Interoperability” and “Top 10 Healthcare Disruptor” awards. To learn more about Validic, follow Validc on Twitter or visit www.validic.com. EVOLUTION ROAD Evolution Road is a marketing innovation consultancy specializing in driving topline sales and maximizing ROI while helping patients and healthcare professionals make better health decisions at the same time. We focus on strategic planning, research, content and creative strategy, analysis, and on-going management of digital initiatives to drive business and help patients achieve better health outcomes.To learn more about Evolution Road, visit www.evolutionroad.com. 39/40
  41. 41. 40/40 SHARE  THIS  RESOURCE  WITH  OTHERS HELP  ACCELERATE  DIGITAL  HEALTH  INNOVATION   BY  SHARING  THIS  MINI-­‐HANDBOOK   Click the icons below to get started.

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