Global Stratificatio Nppt5

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Global Stratificatio Nppt5

  1. 1. GLOBAL STRATIFICATION<br />AND THE DIMENSIONS OF POVERTY<br />FJ MURPHY<br />
  2. 2. GLOBAL STRATIFICATION<br />Patterns of social inequality all over the world<br />Denoted by three broad categories: most industrialized nations, industrializing nations, and least industrialized nations<br />Each category differ in amounts of three basic components of American stratification system: <br />Wealth (defined by land/money)<br />Power<br />Prestige <br />
  3. 3. MOST INDUSTRIALIZED NATIONS<br />United States<br />Canada<br />Japan<br />Great Britain<br />France<br />Other Western European countries<br />People on average are provided with sufficient materials due to a highly productive economy<br />
  4. 4. INDUSTRIALIZING NATIONS<br />On the high end – Mexico (Latin America), Botswana (Africa), where annual income is about $9,800<br />At the low end – Bolivia (Latin America), Lesotho (Africa), and Vietnam (Asia), with a roughly $3,000 annual income<br />Most of the Countries in former Soviet Union/nations of Eastern Europe<br />
  5. 5. LEAST INDUSTRIALIZED NATIONS<br />Consist of half of the land on earth and includes 70% of the worlds people<br />Poverty is severe and widespread<br />Lives of the world’s poorest people shaped by hunger, disease, and unsafe housing<br />Small numbers of elites live very well in the poorest nations<br />
  6. 6. DISTRIBUTION OF GLOBAL INCOME<br />
  7. 7. THE SEVERITY OF POVERTY<br />Poverty is more severe in its poor countries than rich countries<br />Regions where population growth is highest, economic productivity is lowest<br />Relative poverty – lack of resources that are taken for granted by other individuals<br />Absolute poverty – a life-threatening lack of resources<br />
  8. 8. THE EXTENT OF POVERTY<br />Most people in lower income countries live no better than the poor in the United States or far worse<br />Absolute poverty is greatest in Africa due to high death rate amongst children<br />About 1 billion people in the world as a whole suffer from chronic hunger which leads to less ability to work and high risk for disease<br />
  9. 9. EXTENT OF POVERTY (CONT’D)<br />COMPARISON<br />Typical adult in rich nation – ex. United States<br /><ul><li>Consumes about 3500 calories a day, an excess causing health problems and obesity</li></ul>Typical adult in low- income country – <br /><ul><li>Does more physical labor
  10. 10. Consumes only 2,000 calories a day
  11. 11. Results in undernourishment due too little food or not enough of the right foods</li></li></ul><li>POVERTY AND CHILDREN<br />It is estimated that at least 100 million children in poor countries, in order to provide income for their families, will steal, beg, sell sex, and work for drug gangs<br />Leads to school drop out along with a high risk for disease and violence<br />Girls become pregnant with little or no medical assistance<br />Estimated that another 100 million of world’s children become “street children”<br />Half of those children are found in Mexico City and Rio de Janeiro<br />
  12. 12. POVERTY AND CHILDREN (CONT’D)<br />Darfur, region of Sudan, children are subjects of abuse as well as unspeakable abuse<br />Forced to work as sex slaves, physical labor for no pay, and join militia groups<br />In poor societies, women make up the majority of sweatshop workers and it is tradition that keeps them out of many other jobs<br />70% of world’s 1 billion people in absolute poverty are women<br />
  13. 13. CONCLUSION<br />“THE CONCENTRATION OF WEALTH IN HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES, COUPLED WITH THE GRINDING POVERTY IN LOW-INCOME NATIONS, MAY WELL BE THE BIGGEST PROBLEM FACING HUMANITY IN THE TWENTY- FIRST CENTURY”<br />(MACIONIS, P.353)<br />
  14. 14. REFERENCES<br />MACIONIS, J. (2009). Global Stratification. Sociology. (12the.d.). Upper Saddle River, NJ<br />(n.d.) Sociology. Social Stratisfication and Inequality. Retrieved May 19, 2009 from, http://www.sparksnotes.com/101/sociology<br />

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