Our once and now
relationship with
w the book w
pamela@madebyjune.com	
  
boc w bocian w boek w buch w beech
The etymology
references function
and physical material.
The Dead Sea Scrolls: National Geographic, Photograph by Baz Ratner, Reuters
Mesopotamian Tablet, circa 4000 BC at the Bri...
Codex: trunk of tree, block of wood
“A codex is composed of many books
(librorum); a book is of one scroll
(voluminis). It is called codex by way of
metaphor ...
w Margins
w Footnotes
w Illustration
w Tables of contents
w Bookmarks
w Index
w Thumb tabs
w Edge color
w Spine p...
advent of the codex moveable type	
   scrolling desktop
screens, ereaders,
tablets
tablets, scrolls
3,000 BC 100 – 300 137...
books as bodies:
head, tail and spine	
  
to crack the spine of a book...	
  
to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…	
  
to judge a
book by its
cover…	
  
bookshelves as a reflection of ourselves
books as nourishment: to crave, to devour...	
  
books as art: writers, illustrators, typographers, designers
to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…	
  
books as memory:
building patina, a
living history	
  
books as ideas: book
burnings are symbolic
acts of destruction, the
annihilation of culture,
the silencing of voices 	
  
the advent of digital	
  
Kindle: “The instruction we find in books
is like fire. We fetch it from our
neighbours, kindle it at home,
communicate it...
The etymology
references function
and evolution.
from precious objects to
disposable consumables
penny dreadfuls - 19th century
dime novels - 19th century
pulp fiction - 2...
What do we lose?	
  
Tactility
Sound & Smell
Visual Appeal
Haptic Perception
Patina
The Codex
to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…	
  
is our focus fading?
to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…	
  
the tyranny of
replication
What do we gain?	
  
Enriched Experiences
New forms of Art
New Ways of Storytelling
Big Data
More efficient learning
Acces...
Thank You	
  
Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book with Pamela Hilborn
Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book with Pamela Hilborn
Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book with Pamela Hilborn
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Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book with Pamela Hilborn

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Presented at FITC Toronto 2014 on April 27-29, 2014
More info at www.FITC.ca

Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book
with Pamela Hilborn

The physical book is one of the most beloved formats in human culture. Join Pamela – a book-lover and a designer – and travel through history to understand how this format has evolved over time. Pamela will dig deep into the anthropology of the book, exploring our relationship to this once-sacred and rare object. She will also take a look at how new technology is helping to enhance the experience of reading as we move from analog to digital reading experiences.

Published in: Design, Education, Technology
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Our Once and Now Relationship with the Book with Pamela Hilborn

  1. 1. Our once and now relationship with w the book w
  2. 2. pamela@madebyjune.com  
  3. 3. boc w bocian w boek w buch w beech
  4. 4. The etymology references function and physical material.
  5. 5. The Dead Sea Scrolls: National Geographic, Photograph by Baz Ratner, Reuters Mesopotamian Tablet, circa 4000 BC at the British Museum. Source: news.au.com, Photo/Sang Tan, AP The Dead Sea Scrolls: National Geographic, Photo/Baz Ratner, Reuters Clay tablet with cuneiform letter and envelope, circa 1900 BC at the British Museum. Source: British Museum, britishmuseum.org
  6. 6. Codex: trunk of tree, block of wood
  7. 7. “A codex is composed of many books (librorum); a book is of one scroll (voluminis). It is called codex by way of metaphor from the trunks (caudex) of trees or vines, as if it were a wooden stock, because it contains in itself a multitude of books, as it were of branches…” - Isidore of Seville,  Etymologiae (VI.13)
  8. 8. w Margins w Footnotes w Illustration w Tables of contents w Bookmarks w Index w Thumb tabs w Edge color w Spine printing  
  9. 9. advent of the codex moveable type   scrolling desktop screens, ereaders, tablets tablets, scrolls 3,000 BC 100 – 300 1370s - 1440 1990s w 2D, linear w Fragile w Manual Production w Low portability w Limited re-use w Inefficient use of materials w Difficult to store w Scrolls: two handed usage   w 3D, non-linear w Durable w Manual Production w Highly Portable w Easily shared w Efficient use of materials w Easily stored: side- by-side, shelf w Single handed use w Mass Production   w 2D, non-linear w Format Wars w Mass Production w Highly Portable w Easily shared w Efficient use of materials w Mass storage w Single handed use
  10. 10. books as bodies: head, tail and spine  
  11. 11. to crack the spine of a book...  
  12. 12. to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…   to judge a book by its cover…  
  13. 13. bookshelves as a reflection of ourselves
  14. 14. books as nourishment: to crave, to devour...  
  15. 15. books as art: writers, illustrators, typographers, designers
  16. 16. to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…  
  17. 17. books as memory: building patina, a living history  
  18. 18. books as ideas: book burnings are symbolic acts of destruction, the annihilation of culture, the silencing of voices  
  19. 19. the advent of digital  
  20. 20. Kindle: “The instruction we find in books is like fire. We fetch it from our neighbours, kindle it at home, communicate it to others and it becomes the property of all.” - Voltaire Nook: Comfortable place to read, some conjecture as to “new book”; rhymes with Book Kobo: Anagram of Book; the rearrangement of the book as we know it, a fundamental shift, yet a nod to the historical
  21. 21. The etymology references function and evolution.
  22. 22. from precious objects to disposable consumables penny dreadfuls - 19th century dime novels - 19th century pulp fiction - 20th century viral content - 21st century
  23. 23. What do we lose?   Tactility Sound & Smell Visual Appeal Haptic Perception Patina The Codex
  24. 24. to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…   is our focus fading?
  25. 25. to crack the spine of a book, to crave, to devour…   the tyranny of replication
  26. 26. What do we gain?   Enriched Experiences New forms of Art New Ways of Storytelling Big Data More efficient learning Access + Storage
  27. 27. Thank You  

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