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Design as a Means of Reflection

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Design as a Means of Reflection
with Tanner Woodford

OVERVIEW
Reviewing innovation in Chicago over the past century, a clear pattern emerges. It is characterized by selfless passion, an entrepreneurial spirit, fierce collaboration, and design for a community that’s greater than the sum of its parts. This session represents a survey of accomplishments by Chicagoans that have fundamentally changed the context in which we practice; and explores what it takes to leave the comfort of one’s boundaries to pursue a passion project full-time.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this session is to urge attendees to consider the decisions that have shaped the context in which they practice, while inspiring them to consider pursuing their passion projects.

FIVE THINGS AUDIENCE MEMBERS WILL LEARN

An ultra-brief, 100-year history of design in Chicago
Lessons learned from going through the process of creating a non-profit start-up
Background context on an organization that strengthens design culture and builds community through the exchange of knowledge and experiences
Learning by doing is a wonderful means of developing professional skills and relationships
Personal and professional development is often intermixed

Published in: Design
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Design as a Means of Reflection

  1. 1. Hello
  2. 2. Hello, I’m Tanner.
  3. 3. Abbreviated history of design Design as an instrument of change Investing in a collaborative future
  4. 4. Abbreviated history of design Design as an instrument of change Investing in a collaborative future
  5. 5. 1915
  6. 6. 1916
  7. 7. 1917
  8. 8. 1918
  9. 9. 1919
  10. 10. 1920
  11. 11. 1921
  12. 12. 1922
  13. 13. 1923
  14. 14. 1924
  15. 15. 1925
  16. 16. 1926
  17. 17. 1927
  18. 18. 1928
  19. 19. 1929
  20. 20. 1930
  21. 21. 1931
  22. 22. 1932
  23. 23. 1933
  24. 24. 1934
  25. 25. 1935
  26. 26. 1936
  27. 27. 1937
  28. 28. 1938
  29. 29. 1939
  30. 30. 1940
  31. 31. 1941
  32. 32. 1942
  33. 33. 1943
  34. 34. 1944
  35. 35. 1945
  36. 36. 1946
  37. 37. 1947
  38. 38. 1948
  39. 39. 1949
  40. 40. 1950
  41. 41. 1951
  42. 42. 1952
  43. 43. 1953
  44. 44. 1954
  45. 45. 1955
  46. 46. 1956
  47. 47. 1957
  48. 48. 1958
  49. 49. 1959
  50. 50. 1960
  51. 51. 1961
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  53. 53. 1963
  54. 54. 1964
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  56. 56. 1966
  57. 57. 1967
  58. 58. 1968
  59. 59. 1969
  60. 60. 1970
  61. 61. 1971
  62. 62. 1972
  63. 63. 1973
  64. 64. 1974
  65. 65. 1975
  66. 66. 1976
  67. 67. 1977
  68. 68. 1978
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  70. 70. 1980
  71. 71. 1981
  72. 72. 1982
  73. 73. 1983
  74. 74. 1984
  75. 75. 1985
  76. 76. 1986
  77. 77. 1987
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  80. 80. 1990
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  83. 83. 1993
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  85. 85. 1995
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  87. 87. 1997
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  90. 90. 2000
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  100. 100. 2010
  101. 101. 2011
  102. 102. 2012
  103. 103. 2013
  104. 104. 2014
  105. 105. 2015
  106. 106. Abbreviated history of design Design as an instrument of change Investing in a collaborative future
  107. 107. Design is the manipulation of form and content.” Paul Rand “
  108. 108. Design is the manipulation of form and content.” Paul Rand “
  109. 109. Design is the manipulation of form and content, within context.
  110. 110. Design is the manipulation of form and content, within context.
  111. 111. Design is intentional change, affecting the way people think, manipulating the way they perceive a situation, and persuading them to act a specific way.
  112. 112. Design is an activity in which all stakeholders are involved. It is action, a process more than a product.
  113. 113. Given an understanding of environment and context, designers can use tools and communication channels to manipulate perception, and define the way you feel.
  114. 114. Your audience only knows what you choose to tell them.
  115. 115. Most apps upload here >
  116. 116. Instagram uploads here>
  117. 117. What you believe about something often determines what you do or don’t do. Designers are able to massively affect what someone believes about something.
  118. 118. Motivation has to do with making tasks more desirable. A motivated person has a goal, conscious or subconscious, and they want to exert time and energy to achieve it. Designers set the goal.
  119. 119. It is both your opportunity and responsibility to carefully manage the perceptions and motivations of your intended audiences.
  120. 120. If design is intentional change, what is social change?
  121. 121. Using design as a means of enacting positive social change with students at SAIC.
  122. 122. Jordan Martin
  123. 123. Lauren Warrenfeltz
  124. 124. Monika Paulaviciute
  125. 125. Introducing real clients to the learning experience
  126. 126. Opportunity
  127. 127. Organizing 12 students into 4 groups Giving back to Logan Square Identifying partnership opportunities Food and cultural sustainability Billboard installation and lighting
  128. 128. Abbreviated history of design Design as an instrument of change Investing in a collaborative future
  129. 129. The starchitect is no longer.
  130. 130. 2011 — What is the role of a museum in today’s society?
  131. 131. 2011 — What is the role of a museum in today’s society?
  132. 132. 2012 — How can we better connect the design community—within disciplines, and to the public?
  133. 133. 2012
  134. 134. 2012
  135. 135. 2013 — How do you know when it’s time to take the leap?
  136. 136. 2013 — How do you know when it’s time to take the leap?
  137. 137. 2012
  138. 138. 2012
  139. 139. 2014 — How can a museum better support and define the overlap between academia and practice?
  140. 140. Design has the capacity to fundamentally improve the human condition.
  141. 141. 2012
  142. 142. 2012
  143. 143. 2014 × 2 — What does it mean to reinterpret a traveling exhibition?
  144. 144. 2012
  145. 145. 2012
  146. 146. 2015 — How do we raise the presence of Chicago designers, in the United States and across the world?
  147. 147. — Then, we got a gift.
  148. 148. 2012
  149. 149. 2012
  150. 150. 2015 × 2 — What does it mean to make a non-profit start-up sustainable?
  151. 151. Debuting two new projects!
  152. 152. We’re giving students free memberships in 2016. — Nominate or apply at ChiDM.com/students/apply
  153. 153. Thank you!
  154. 154. Thank you! tanner@chidm.com

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