Notice of
                                   2007
                      Annual Meeting of
                          Shareh...
TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                              PAGE

Chairman’s Letter ...
Ward J. Timken, Jr.
Chairman - Board of Directors




                                March 15, 2007




                 ...
THE TIMKEN COMPANY
                                              Canton, Ohio
                                         ___...
THE TIMKEN COMPANY
                                              ____________________

                                   ...
The following table, based on information obtained in part from the respective nominees and in part from
the records of th...
CONTINUING DIRECTORS
   The remaining eight Directors, named below, will continue to serve in their respective classes unt...
Age; Principal Position or Office;                               Director
                            Business Experience ...
DIRECTOR COMPENSATION
Cash Compensation

   Each Nonemployee Director who served in 2006 was paid at the annual rate of $6...
(1)   Ward J. Timken, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Directors and James W. Griffith, President and Chief
         Executiv...
Based on the review and discussions referred to above, the Audit Committee recommended to the Board
of Directors that the ...
COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT
   The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Ana...
FINANCE COMMITTEE
   The Company has a standing Finance Committee. The Committee advises and consults with
management and ...
BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK
   The following table shows, as of January 10, 2007, the beneficial ownership of Com...
(1)   Includes shares which the individual or group named in the table has the right to acquire, on
      or before March ...
The following table gives information known to the Company about each beneficial owner of more than
5% of Common Stock of ...
COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

   The Company, with the guidance and approval of the Compensation Committee of the ...
determines the appropriate mix of cash and non-cash based on market and internal considerations. As a
result, the allocati...
Committee considers the deductibility of compensation and benefits for Federal income tax purposes, along
with other relev...
results in relation to the target goals under the plan. In addition, the Committee retains the discretion to
adjust downwa...
On average, for the named executive officers, each of the Company’s long-term incentive vehicles
represents approximately ...
term stock price volatility like shareholders. These targets set a specific level of ownership ranging for
named executive...
commitment by the Company to pay the amounts due under the plan. When such payments are due, they
will be distributed from...
SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

    The following table sets forth information concerning compensation for the Company’s princ...
dividend equivalents, 45,000 restricted shares, and 25,000 deferred shares; and the amount shown for
    Mrs. Dedo include...
$9,940 reimbursement by the Company for financial planning expenses. The maximum annual
allowance is $10,000.
$1,957 for r...
2006 GRANTS OF PLAN-BASED AWARDS

        The following table sets forth information concerning certain grants made to the...
(4) All options granted to the named executive officers in the last fiscal year were granted on February 6,
    2006. All ...
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timken 2007ProxyCOMPLETE

  1. 1. Notice of 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders and Proxy Statement THE TIMKEN COMPANY Canton, Ohio U.S.A.
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Chairman’s Letter ………………………………………………………………………………….. 2 Notice of Annual Meeting …………………………………………………………………………. 3 Proxy Statement …………………………………………………………………………………… 4 Election of Directors ………………………………………………………………………….. 4 Election of Class I Directors (Item No. 1) ……….…………………………………… 4 Information Concerning Nominees and Continuing Directors ……..………………... 5 Director Compensation ………………………………………………………………………. 8 Audit Committee ……………………………………………………………………………… 9 Audit Committee Report ………………………………………………………………..…… 9 Compensation Committee …………………………………………………………………… 10 Compensation Committee Report ………………………………………………………….. 11 Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee ……………………………………… 11 Finance Committee …………………………………………………………………………… 12 Beneficial Ownership of Common Stock …………………………………………………… 13 Executive Compensation …………………………………………………………….……… 16 Shareholder Proposal (Item No. 2) …………………………………………………………. 36 Auditors ………………………………………………………………………………………... 38 Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance ……………………………... 39 Submission of Shareholder Proposals ……………………………………………………... 39 Shareholder Communications ………………………………………………………………. 39 General ………………………………………………………………………………………… 39 Appendix A …………………………………………………………………………………………. A-1
  3. 3. Ward J. Timken, Jr. Chairman - Board of Directors March 15, 2007 Dear Shareholder: The 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of The Timken Company will be held on Tuesday, May 1, 2007, at ten o'clock in the morning at the corporate offices of the Company in Canton, Ohio. This year, you are being asked to act upon two matters. The first is the election of Directors recommended by your Board of Directors. The second is consideration of a shareholder proposal that your Directors are recommending you do not support. Details of these matters are contained in the accompanying Notice of Annual Meeting of Shareholders and Proxy Statement. Please read the enclosed information carefully before voting your shares. Voting your shares as soon as possible will ensure your representation at the meeting, whether or not you plan to attend. I appreciate the strong support of our shareholders over the years and look forward to a similar vote of support at the 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Sincerely, Ward J. Timken, Jr. Enclosure The Timken Company 1835 Dueber Avneue, S.W. P.O. Box 6927 Canton, OH 44706-0927 U.S.A. -2- Telephone: 330-438-3000
  4. 4. THE TIMKEN COMPANY Canton, Ohio _____________________ NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS __________________________________________ The Annual Meeting of Shareholders of The Timken Company will be held on Tuesday, May 1, 2007, at 10:00 a.m., at 1835 Dueber Avenue, S.W., Canton, Ohio, for the following purposes: 1. To elect five Directors to serve in Class I for a term of three years. 2. To consider a shareholder proposal submitted by the New York City Pension Funds requesting that the Company implement equal employment opportunity policies prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. 3. To transact such other business as may properly come before the meeting. Holders of Common Stock of record at the close of business on February 16, 2007, are the shareholders entitled to notice of and to vote at the meeting. YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT. WHETHER OR NOT YOU PLAN TO ATTEND THE ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS, PLEASE SIGN AND DATE THE ENCLOSED PROXY CARD AND RETURN IT IN THE POSTAGE-PAID ENVELOPE PROVIDED OR VOTE YOUR SHARES ELECTRONICALLY THROUGH THE INTERNET OR BY TELEPHONE. VOTING INSTRUCTIONS ARE PROVIDED ON THE ENCLOSED PROXY CARD. SCOTT A. SCHERFF Corporate Secretary and Assistant General Counsel March 15, 2007 YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT. PLEASE RETURN YOUR PROXY CARD OR VOTE ELECTRONICALLY. -3-
  5. 5. THE TIMKEN COMPANY ____________________ PROXY STATEMENT The enclosed proxy is solicited by the Board of Directors of The Timken Company (the “Company”) in connection with the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on May 1, 2007, at 10:00 a.m. local time at the Company’s corporate offices, and at any adjournments and postponements thereof, for the purpose of considering and acting upon the matters specified in the foregoing Notice. The mailing address of the corporate offices of the Company is 1835 Dueber Avenue, S.W., Canton, Ohio 44706-2798. The approximate date on which this Proxy Statement and form of proxy will be first sent or given to shareholders is March 26, 2007. The Board of Directors is not aware that matters other than those specified in the foregoing Notice will be brought before the meeting for action. However, if any such matters should be brought before the meeting, the persons appointed as proxies may vote or act upon such matters according to their judgment. ELECTION OF DIRECTORS The Company presently has thirteen Directors who, pursuant to the Amended Regulations of the Company, are divided into three classes with five Directors in Class I, four Directors in Class II and four Directors in Class III. From the 2006 Annual Meeting of Shareholders until July 10, 2006, there were twelve Directors, with five Directors in Class I, four Directors in Class II and three Directors in Class III. At the Board of Directors’ meeting held on July 10, 2006, the Board passed a resolution increasing the size of the Board from twelve to thirteen Directors, effective July 10, 2006, and John P. Reilly was elected by the Directors then in office to fill the vacancy apportioned to Class III. At the 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, five Directors will be elected to serve in Class I for a three-year term to expire at the 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. Under Ohio law and the Company's Amended Regulations, candidates for Director receiving the greatest number of votes will be elected. Abstentions and “broker non-votes” (where a broker, other record holder, or nominee indicates on a proxy card that it does not have authority to vote certain shares on a particular matter) will not be counted in the election of Directors and will not have any effect on the result of the vote. If any nominee becomes unable, for any reason, to serve as a Director, or should a vacancy occur before the election (which events are not anticipated), the Directors then in office may substitute another person as a nominee or may reduce the number of nominees as they shall deem advisable. ITEM NO. 1 ELECTION OF CLASS I DIRECTORS The Board of Directors, by resolution at its February 6, 2007 meeting, based on the recommendation of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the Board, nominated the five individuals set forth below to be elected Directors in Class I at the 2007 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to serve for a term of three years expiring at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in 2010 (or until their respective successors are elected and qualified). All of the nominees have been previously elected as a Director by the shareholders. Each of the nominees listed below has consented to serve as a Director if elected. Unless otherwise indicated on any proxy, the persons named as proxies on the enclosed proxy form intend to vote the shares covered by such proxy form in favor of the nominees named below. The Board of Directors unanimously recommends a vote FOR the election of the nominees named below. -4-
  6. 6. The following table, based on information obtained in part from the respective nominees and in part from the records of the Company, sets forth information regarding each nominee as of January 10, 2007. Age; Principal Position or Office; Director Business Experience for Last Five Years; Continuously Name of Nominee Directorships of Publicly Held Companies Since James W. Griffith 53, President and Chief Executive Officer of 1999 The Timken Company, since 2002. Previous position: President and Chief Operating Officer, 1999-2002. Director of: Goodrich Corporation. Jerry J. Jasinowski 68, Retired President and Chief Executive 2004 Officer of the National Association of Manufacturers and Retired President of The Manufacturing Institute, the education and research arm of the National Association of Manufacturers, the nation’s largest industrial trade association, since 2006. Previous positions: President – The Manufacturing Institute, 2005-2006; President and Chief Executive Officer – National Association of Manufacturers, 1990-2004. Director of: webMethods, Inc.; Harsco Corporation; The Phoenix Companies, Inc. John A. Luke, Jr. 58, Chairman and Chief Executive 1999 Officer of MeadWestvaco Corporation, a leading global producer of packaging, coated and specialty papers, consumer and office products, and specialty chemicals, since 2003. Previous positions: Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of MeadWestvaco Corporation, 2003; President and Chief Executive Officer of MeadWestvaco Corporation, 2002-2003; Director of: The Bank of New York Company, Inc.; FM Global; MeadWestvaco Corporation. Frank C. Sullivan 46, President and Chief Executive Officer of RPM 2003 International Inc., a world leader in specialty coatings, since 2002. Previous position: President and Chief Operating Officer, RPM International Inc., 2001-2002. Director of: RPM International Inc. Ward J. Timken 64, President – Timken Foundation of Canton, a 1971 private, charitable foundation to promote civic betterment through capital fund grants, since 2004. Previous position: Vice President of The Timken Company, 1992-2003. -5-
  7. 7. CONTINUING DIRECTORS The remaining eight Directors, named below, will continue to serve in their respective classes until their respective terms expire. The following table, based on information obtained in part from the respective Directors and in part from the records of the Company, sets forth information regarding each continuing Director as of January 10, 2007. Age; Principal Position or Office; Director Business Experience for Last Five Years; Term Continuously Name of Director Directorships of Publicly Held Companies Expires Since Phillip R. Cox 59, President and Chief Executive Officer of 2008 2004 Cox Financial Corporation, a financial services company, since 1972. Director of: Cincinnati Bell, Inc.; Diebold, Incorporated; Duke Energy Corporation; Touchstone Mutual Funds. Robert W. Mahoney 70, Chairman Emeritus of Diebold, 2008 1992 Incorporated, a company specializing in the automation of self-service transactions, security products, software and service for its products, since 1999. Director of: Cincinnati Bell, Inc.; Sherwin-Williams Co. Joseph W. Ralston 63, Vice Chairman, The Cohen Group, an 2009 2003 organization that provides clients with comprehensive tools for understanding and shaping their business, political, legal, regulatory and media environments, since 2003. Previous positions: General – United States Air Force (Retired); Supreme Allied Commander, Europe, NATO, 2000-2003. Director of: Lockheed Martin Corporation; URS Corporation. John P. Reilly 63, Retired Chairman, President and Chief 2009 2006 Executive Officer of Figgie International, an international diversified operating company, since 1998. Director of: Exide Corporation (Chairman); Material Sciences Corporation; Marshfield Door Systems. John M. Timken, Jr. 55, Private Investor. 2009 1986 Ward J. Timken, Jr. 39, Chairman – Board of Directors of The Timken 2008 2002 Company, since 2005. Previous positions: Vice Chairman and President – Steel, 2005; Executive Vice President and President – Steel, 2004-2005; Corporate Vice President – Office of the Chairman, 2000-2003. Joseph F. Toot, Jr. 71, Retired President and Chief Executive 2008 1968 Officer of The Timken Company, since 1998. Director of: PSA Peugeot Citroen; Rockwell Automation, Inc.; Rockwell Collins, Inc. -6-
  8. 8. Age; Principal Position or Office; Director Business Experience for Last Five Years; Term Continuously Name of Director Directorships of Publicly Held Companies Expires Since Jacqueline F. Woods 59, Retired President of SBC/at&t Ohio, 2009 2000 a telecommunications company, since 2000. Director of: School Specialty, Inc.; The Anderson’s Inc. Ward J. Timken is the father of Ward J. Timken, Jr. and the cousin of John M. Timken, Jr. The Board of Directors has adopted the independence standards of the New York Stock Exchange listing requirements for determining the independence of Directors. Those standards are annexed to this Proxy Statement as Appendix A. The Board has determined that the following continuing Directors or Director nominees have no material relationship with the Company and meet those independence standards: Phillip R. Cox, Jerry J. Jasinowski, John A. Luke, Jr., Robert W. Mahoney, Joseph W. Ralston, John P. Reilly, Frank C. Sullivan, John M. Timken, Jr., Joseph F. Toot, Jr., and Jacqueline F. Woods. With respect to John M. Timken, Jr., the Board determined that Mr. Timken’s family relationship to Ward J. Timken and Ward J. Timken, Jr. does not impair Mr. Timken’s independence. Further, with respect to the finding that Joseph F. Toot, Jr., a former Chief Executive Officer of the Company, is independent, important factors considered by the Board included the fact that Mr. Toot retired as an executive of the Company in 1998 and that he receives no cash compensation from the Company (excluding his pension) other than Director fees. The Board found that the office space and administrative support supplied to Mr. Toot by the Company do not create a material relationship. The Company’s Directors and executive officers are subject to the Company’s Standard of Business Ethics Policy, which requires that any potential conflicts of interest such as significant transactions with related parties be reported to the Company’s General Counsel. In the event of any potential conflict of interest, pursuant to the charter of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and the provisions of the Standards of Business Ethics Policy, the Committee would review and, considering such factors as it deems appropriate under the circumstances, make a determination as to whether to grant a waiver to the Policy for any such transaction. Any waiver would be promptly disclosed to shareholders. The Board of Directors has an Audit Committee, a Compensation Committee, a Finance Committee, and a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. During 2006, there were seven meetings of the Board of Directors, ten meetings of its Audit Committee, four meetings of its Compensation Committee, and four meetings of its Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The Finance Committee was created in November 2006, and no meetings were conducted in 2006. All nominees for Director and all continuing Directors attended 75 percent or more of the meetings of the Board and its Committees on which they served. All members of the Board of Directors are expected to attend the Annual Meeting of Shareholders. All Board members then in office attended last year’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders. At each regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors, the Nonemployee Directors and the independent Directors also meet separately in executive sessions. The Chairpersons of the standing committees preside over those sessions on a rotating basis. -7-
  9. 9. DIRECTOR COMPENSATION Cash Compensation Each Nonemployee Director who served in 2006 was paid at the annual rate of $60,000 for services as a Director. The Chairperson of the Audit Committee receives $30,000 annually in addition to base Director compensation and other members of the Audit Committee receive an additional $15,000 annually for serving on the Audit Committee. The Chairperson of the Compensation Committee, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and the Finance Committee each receive $15,000 annually in addition to base Director compensation and the other members of the Compensation Committee, the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and the Finance Committee receive an additional $7,500 annually for serving on each Committee. Stock Compensation Each Nonemployee Director serving at the time of the Annual Meeting of Shareholders on April 18, 2006, received a grant of 2,500 shares of Common Stock under The Timken Company Long-Term Incentive Plan, as Amended and Restated (the “Long-Term Incentive Plan”), following the meeting. The shares received are required to be held by each Nonemployee Director until his or her departure from the Board of Directors. Upon a Director’s initial election to the Board, each new Nonemployee Director receives a grant of 2,000 restricted shares of Common Stock under the Long-Term Incentive Plan, which vest over a five-year period. John P. Reilly received such a grant upon his election on July 10, 2006. Compensation Deferral Any Director may elect to defer the receipt of all or a specified portion of his or her cash and/or stock compensation in accordance with the provisions of The Director Deferred Compensation Plan adopted by the Board on February 4, 2000. Pursuant to the plan, cash fees can be deferred into a notional account and paid at a future date requested by the Director. The account will be adjusted through investment crediting options, which include interest earned quarterly at a rate based on the prime rate plus one percent or the total shareholder return of the Company’s Common Stock, with amounts paid either in a lump sum or in installments in cash. Stock compensation can be deferred to a future date and paid either in a lump sum or installments and is payable in shares plus a cash amount representing dividend equivalents during the deferral period. The following table provides details of Director compensation in 2006. Name Fees Earned or Stock Awards All Other Total Paid in Cash ($) Compensation ($) (1) (2) (3) $86,250 $104,281 $190,531 Phillip R. Cox $75,000 $103,923 $178,923 Jerry J. Jasinowski $82,500 $94,305 $176,805 John A. Luke, Jr. $90,000 $94,305 $184,305 Robert W. Mahoney $82,500 $101,273 $183,773 Joseph W. Ralston $34,238 $5,550 $ 39,788 John P. Reilly $91,875 $101,105 $192,980 Frank C. Sullivan $76,875 $94,305 $171,180 John M. Timken, Jr. $60,000 $94,305 $154,305 Ward J. Timken (4) $67,500 $94,305 $49,300 $211,105 Joseph F. Toot, Jr. $75,000 $94,305 $169,305 Jacqueline F. Woods -8-
  10. 10. (1) Ward J. Timken, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Directors and James W. Griffith, President and Chief Executive Officer, are not included in this table as they are employees of the company and receive no compensation for their services as Directors. (2) The entire award of 2,500 shares of Common Stock on April 18, 2006, vested upon grant and expense under FAS 123R was immediately recognized upon grant amounting to $85,825 for each Director other than Mr. Reilly, who was not a Director on the date of grant. (3) Each Nonemployee Director also received a one-time grant of 3,000 non-qualified stock options on April 19, 2005 that vested in one year, valued at $25,440 based on its Black-Scholes value derived at the time of grant, other than Mr. Reilly, who was not a Director on the date of grant. The expense recognized under FAS 123R for that stock option grant for 2006 is $8,480. The remaining amounts shown in the table above are the expense recognized under FAS 123R for 2006 from the one-time grant of 2,000 restricted shares received by each Director upon joining the Board. Those amounts are as follows: Mr. Cox - $9,976; Mr. Jasinowski - $9,618; Mr. Ralston - $6,968; Mr. Reilly - $5,550; and Mr. Sullivan - $6,800. As of December 31, 2006, each Nonemployee Director has the following number of options outstanding from grants in prior years: Mr. Cox – 3,000; Mr. Jasinowski – 6,000; Mr. Luke – 18,000; Mr. Mahoney – 18,000; Mr. Ralston – 9,000; Mr. Reilly – 0; Mr. Sullivan – 6,000; John M. Timken, Jr. – 9,000; Ward J. Timken – 45,500; Mr. Toot – 68,000; Mrs. Woods – 18,000. Totals for Ward J. Timken and Mr. Toot include outstanding option grants awarded when they were employees of the Company. The following Directors have unvested shares remaining from his or her grant of 2,000 restricted shares upon his or her initial election to the Board: Mr. Cox – 1,200; Mr. Jasinowski – 1,200; Mr. Ralston – 800; Mr. Reilly – 2,000; and Mr. Sullivan – 800. (4) As a former Chief Executive Officer of the Company, Mr. Toot is provided an office, administrative support and home security system monitoring. These items are valued at the Company’s cost, and the office and administrative support constitute approximately 99% of the total value. AUDIT COMMITTEE The Company has a standing Audit Committee of the Board of Directors, established in accordance with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The Audit Committee has oversight responsibility with respect to the Company’s independent auditors and the integrity of the Company’s financial statements. The Audit Committee is composed of Frank C. Sullivan (Chairman), Phillip R. Cox, Robert W. Mahoney, John P. Reilly, and John M. Timken, Jr. All members of the Audit Committee are independent as defined in the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange. The Board of Directors of the Company has determined that the Company has at least one audit committee financial expert serving on the Audit Committee, and has designated Frank C. Sullivan as that expert. The Audit Committee’s charter is available on the Company’s website at www.timken.com and copies are available upon request to the Company’s Corporate Secretary using the process described on page 40 of this Proxy Statement. AUDIT COMMITTEE REPORT The Audit Committee has reviewed and discussed with the Company’s management and the Company’s independent auditors the audited financial statements of the Company contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006. The Audit Committee has also discussed with the Company’s independent auditors the matters required to be discussed pursuant to Statement of Accounting Standards 61 (Codification of Statements on Auditing Standards, Communication with Audit Committees). The Audit Committee has received and reviewed the written disclosure and the letter from the Company’s independent auditors required by Independence Standards Board Standard No. 1 (“Independence Discussions with Audit Committees”), has discussed with the Company’s independent auditors such independent auditors’ independence, and considered the compatibility of non-audit services with the auditors’ independence. -9-
  11. 11. Based on the review and discussions referred to above, the Audit Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the audited financial statements be included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Frank C. Sullivan, Chairman Phillip R. Cox Robert W. Mahoney John P. Reilly John M. Timken, Jr. COMPENSATION COMMITTEE The Company has a standing Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee establishes and administers the Company’s policies, programs and procedures for compensating its senior management and Board of Directors. Members of the Compensation Committee are John A. Luke, Jr. (Chairman), Phillip R. Cox, Jerry J. Jasinowski, Joseph W. Ralston, John P. Reilly, and Jacqueline F. Woods. All members of the Compensation Committee are independent as defined in the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange. The Company, with the guidance and approval of the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors, has developed compensation programs for executive officers, including the Chief Executive Officer, that are intended to provide a total compensation package that enables the Company to attract, retain and motivate superior quality executive management, that reflects competitive market practices based on comparative data from a relevant peer group of companies, and that links the financial interests of executive management with those of shareholders, through short and long-term incentive plans clearly tied to corporate, business unit and individual performance. The Compensation Committee determines specific compensation elements for the Chief Executive Officer and considers and acts upon recommendations made by the Chief Executive Officer regarding the other executive officers. The agenda for meetings of the Compensation Committee is determined by its Chairman with the assistance of the Senior Vice President – Human Resources and Organizational Advancement. The meetings are regularly attended by the Chairman of the Board, the Chief Executive Officer, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Executive Vice President – Finance and Administration, Senior Vice President – Human Resources and Organizational Advancement and Director – Total Rewards. At each meeting, the Compensation Committee meets in executive session. The Chairman of the Compensation Committee reports the Committee’s actions regarding compensation of executive officers to the full Board of Directors. The Company’s Human Resources and Organizational Advancement department supports the Compensation Committee in its duties and may be delegated certain administrative duties in connection with the Company’s compensation programs. The Committee has the sole authority to retain and terminate compensation consultants to assist in the evaluation of Director or executive officer compensation and the sole authority to approve the fees and other retention terms of any compensation consultants. The Compensation Committee has engaged Towers Perrin, a global professional services firm, to conduct annual reviews of its total compensation programs for executive officers and from time-to-time to review the total compensation of Directors. Towers Perrin also provides information to the Compensation Committee on trends in executive compensation and other market data. With respect to Director compensation, as stated above, the Compensation Committee periodically engages Towers Perrin to conduct reviews of total Director compensation, and the Committee then recommends to the full Board of Directors changes in Director compensation that will enhance the Company’s ability to attract and retain qualified Directors. The Compensation Committee’s charter is available on the Company’s website at www.timken.com and copies are available upon request to the Company’s Corporate Secretary using the process described on page 40 of this Proxy Statement. -10-
  12. 12. COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT The Compensation Committee has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis (the “CD&A”) for the year ended December 31, 2006, with management. In reliance on the reviews and discussions referred to above, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors, and the Board has approved, that the CD&A be included in this Proxy Statement for the year ended December 31, 2006, for filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. John A. Luke, Jr. (Chairman) Phillip R. Cox Jerry J. Jasinowski John P. Reilly Joseph W. Ralston Jacqueline F. Woods NOMINATING AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE The Company has a standing Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is responsible for, among other things, evaluating new Director candidates and incumbent Directors, and recommending Directors to serve as members of the Board Committees. Members of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee are Robert W. Mahoney (Chairman), Jerry J. Jasinowski, John A. Luke, Jr., Joseph W. Ralston, Joseph F. Toot, Jr., and Jacqueline F. Woods. All members of the Committee are independent as defined in the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange. Director candidates recommended by shareholders will be considered in accordance with the Company’s Amended Regulations or otherwise. In order for a shareholder to submit a recommendation, the shareholder must deliver a communication by registered mail or in person to the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, c/o The Timken Company, 1835 Dueber Avenue, S.W., P.O. Box 6932, Canton, Ohio 44706- 0932. Such communication should include the proposed candidate’s qualifications, any relationship between the shareholder and the proposed candidate and any other information that the shareholder would consider useful for the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee to consider in evaluating such candidate. The General Policies and Procedures of the Board of Directors provide that general criteria for Director candidates include, but are not limited to, the highest integrity and ethical standards, the ability to provide wise and informed guidance to management, a willingness to pursue thoughtful, objective inquiry on important issues before the Company, and a range of experience and knowledge commensurate with the Company’s needs as well as the expectations of knowledgeable investors. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee will consider individuals it believes to be qualified to become Directors and will recommend candidates to the Board of Directors to fill new or vacant positions. In recommending candidates, the Committee will consider such factors as it deems appropriate, consistent with the factors set forth in the Board of Directors’ General Policies and Procedures. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee is also responsible for reviewing the qualifications of, and making recommendations to the Board of Directors for, Director nominations submitted by shareholders. All Director nominees are evaluated in the same manner by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee, without regard to the source of the nominee recommendation. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee’s charter is available on the Company’s website at www.timken.com and copies are available upon request to the Company’s Corporate Secretary using the process described on page 40 of this Proxy Statement. The Company’s code of business conduct and ethics called the “Standards of Business Ethics Policy” and its corporate governance guidelines called the “Board of Directors General Policies and Procedures” are reviewed annually by the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and are available on the Company’s website at www.timken.com. Copies are available upon request to the Company’s Corporate Secretary using the process described on page 40 of this Proxy Statement. -11-
  13. 13. FINANCE COMMITTEE The Company has a standing Finance Committee. The Committee advises and consults with management and the Board of Directors regarding capital structure, dividend and investment policies and other financial matters affecting the Company. Members of the Finance Committee are Phillip R. Cox (Chairman), Frank C. Sullivan, John M. Timken, Jr. and Joseph F. Toot, Jr. All members of the Finance Committee are independent as defined in the listing standards of the New York Stock Exchange. The Finance Committee’s charter is available on the Company’s website at www.timken.com and copies are available upon request to the Company’s Corporate Secretary using the process described on page 40 of this Proxy Statement. -12-
  14. 14. BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK The following table shows, as of January 10, 2007, the beneficial ownership of Common Stock of the Company by each continuing Director, nominee for Director and Executive Officer named in the Summary Compensation Table on page 23 of this Proxy Statement, and by all continuing Directors, nominees for Director and Executive Officers as a group. Beneficial ownership of Common Stock has been determined for this purpose in accordance with Rule 13d-3 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and is based on the sole or shared power to vote or direct the voting or to dispose or direct the disposition of Common Stock. Beneficial ownership as determined in this manner does not necessarily bear on the economic incidents of ownership of Common Stock. Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership of Common Stock Sole Voting Shared Voting Percent Or Investment or Investment Aggregate of Power (1) Amount (1) Name Power Class Michael C. Arnold 130,699 0 130,699 * 7,300(2) 7,300(2) Phillip R. Cox 0 * Jacqueline A. Dedo 118,706 0 118,706 * Glenn A. Eisenberg 113,327 0 113,327 * James W. Griffith 607,371 40,964 648,335 * 11,300(2) 11,300(2) Jerry J. Jasinowski 0 * John A. Luke, Jr. 27,440 0 27,440 * Robert W. Mahoney 29,781 0 29,781 * Joseph W. Ralston 21,001 0 21,001 * John P. Reilly 2,020 0 2,020 * 13,200(2) 13,200(2) Frank C. Sullivan 0 * 612,623(3) 983,277(4) 1,595,900(3) (4) John M. Timken, Jr. 1.7% 6,486,141(4) 6,989,602(4) Ward J. Timken 503,461 7.4% 5,309,754(4) 5,594,706(4) Ward J. Timken, Jr. 284,952 5.9% Joseph F. Toot, Jr. 141,808 200 142,008 * Jacqueline F. Woods 26,343 0 26,343 * All Directors, Nominees 2,914,858 7,001,892 9,916,750 10.5% for Director and Executive Officers as a Group (5) * Percent of class is less than 1%. -13-
  15. 15. (1) Includes shares which the individual or group named in the table has the right to acquire, on or before March 11, 2007, through the exercise of stock options pursuant to the Long-Term Incentive Plan as follows: Michael C. Arnold – 67,450; Phillip R. Cox – 3,000; Jacqueline A. Dedo – 77,500; Glenn A. Eisenberg – 47,500; James W. Griffith – 421,500; Jerry J. Jasinowski – 6,000; John A. Luke, Jr. – 18,000; Robert W. Mahoney – 18,000; Joseph W. Ralston – 9,000; Frank C. Sullivan – 6,000; John M. Timken, Jr. – 9,000; Ward J. Timken – 45,500; Ward J. Timken, Jr. – 123,250; Joseph F. Toot, Jr. – 68,000; Jacqueline F. Woods – 18,000; all Directors, Nominees and Executive Officers as a Group – 1,043,100. Also includes 3,500 deferred shares for Phillip R. Cox; 3,500 deferred shares for Jerry J. Jasinowski; 4,500 deferred shares for Joseph W. Ralston; 5,000 deferred shares for Jacqueline Woods; and 800 vested deferred restricted shares for Phillip Cox; 800 vested deferred restricted shares for Jerry Jasinowski; and 1,200 vested deferred restricted shares for Frank Sullivan awarded as annual grants under the Long-Term Incentive Plan, which will not be issued until a later date under The Director Deferred Compensation Plan. Also includes 20,000 vested deferred restricted shares held by James W. Griffith and deferred under the 1996 Deferred Compensation Plan. The shares described in this footnote (1) have been treated as outstanding for the purpose of calculating the percentage of the class beneficially owned by such individual or group, but not for the purpose of calculating the percentage of the class owned by any other person. (2) Does not include unvested deferred restricted shares held by the following individuals: Phillip R. Cox – 1,200; Jerry J. Jasinowski – 1,200; and Frank C. Sullivan – 800. (3) Includes 197,886 shares for which John M. Timken, Jr. has sole voting and investment power as trustee of three trusts created as the result of distributions from the estate of Susan H. Timken. (4) Includes shares for which another individual named in the table is also deemed to be the beneficial owner, as follows: John M. Timken, Jr. – 517,500; Ward J. Timken – 5,818,444; Ward J. Timken, Jr. – 5,300,944. (5) The number of shares beneficially owned by all Directors, nominees for Directors and Executive Officers as a group has been calculated to eliminate duplication of beneficial ownership. This group consists of 20 individuals. -14-
  16. 16. The following table gives information known to the Company about each beneficial owner of more than 5% of Common Stock of the Company. Beneficial Owner Amount Percent of Class Timken family (1) 11,386,896 shares 12% Participants in The Timken 8,064,521 shares 8.6% Company Savings and Investment Pension Plan (2) Lord, Abbett & Co. LLC (3) 7,379,701 shares 7.8% Earnest Partners LLC (4) 5,361,728 shares 5.7% Barclays Global Investors, N.A. (5) 5,103,476 shares 5.4% (1) Members of the Timken family, including John M. Timken, Jr.; Ward J. Timken; and Ward J. Timken, Jr., have in the aggregate sole or shared voting power with respect to at least an aggregate of 11,386,896 shares (12%) of Common Stock, which amount includes 538,750 shares that members of the Timken family have the right to acquire on or before March 11, 2007. The Timken Foundation of Canton, 200 Market Avenue, North, Suite 201, Canton, Ohio 44702, holds 5,247,944 of these shares, representing 5.6% of the outstanding Common Stock. Ward J. Timken; Joy A. Timken; Ward J. Timken, Jr.; and Nancy S. Knudsen are trustees of the Foundation and share the voting and investment power with respect to such shares. (2) Trustee of the plan is J. P. Morgan Retirement Plan Services LLC, P.O. Box 419784, Kansas City, MO 64179-0654. (3) A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission dated February 12, 2007, by Lord, Abbett & Co. LLC, 90 Hudson Street, Jersey City, New Jersey 07302, indicated that it has voting or investment power over 7,379,701 shares (7.8%) of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock. (4) A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission dated February 14, 2007, by Earnest Partners LLC, 1180 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30309, indicated that it has or shares voting or investment power over 5,361,728 shares (5.7%) of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock. (5) A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission dated January 31, 2007, by Barclays Global Investors, N.A., 45 Fremont Street, San Francisco, California 94105, indicated that it has or shares voting or investment power over 5,103,476 shares (5.4%) of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock. -15-
  17. 17. COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS The Company, with the guidance and approval of the Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors, has developed compensation programs for executive officers, including the Chief Executive Officer and the other executive officers named in the Summary Compensation Table (the “named executive officers”), that are intended to provide a total compensation package that: • enables the Company to attract, retain and motivate superior quality executive management; • reflects competitive market practices based on comparative data from a relevant peer group of companies; and • links the financial interests of executive management with those of shareholders, through short and long-term incentive plans clearly tied to corporate, business unit and individual performance. The Company believes that to meet these objectives it needs to provide a balance of current and long- term compensation. Current compensation provides needed personal liquidity, focuses executives on short- term priorities and dampens the impact of a volatile stock market. Providing a significant portion of executive compensation in the form of long-term compensation strengthens the alignment of executives to the long- term performance of the Company and provides a balance against short-term decision making. The allocation between current and long-term compensation is based primarily on competitive market practices relative to base salaries, annual incentive awards and long-term incentive values as well as the Committee’s assessment of the appropriate mix for the position. The Company also considers certain internal factors that may cause it to adjust a particular element of an executive’s compensation. These internal factors may include the executive’s operating responsibilities, management level, retention risk and tenure and performance in the position. While there is no fixed policy regarding the mix between current and long-term compensation for each position, the company does vary the mix of current and long-term compensation by management level. For example, the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman positions receive more of their compensation in the form of long-term compensation relative to the other named executive officers, with both receiving approximately 40% in current compensation and 60% in long-term compensation, made up of approximately: • 20% in current cash base salary; • 20% in current cash bonus tied to annual performance goals; • 20% in long-term cash bonus pay tied to performance over a three-year cycle; and • 40% in long-term equity incentive compensation (stock options and restricted shares). In comparison, the other named executive officers receive approximately 50% in current compensation and 50% in long-term compensation. Positions lower in the organization have a greater emphasis on current pay. This reflects the Company’s view that more senior executives should have a more significant incentive to focus on and drive the long-term performance of the Company. The Chief Executive Officer and Chairman are expected to focus more than other senior executives on strategic issues that drive long-term performance. The Company also believes that both cash and non-cash compensation are required in order to meet the objectives described above. Cash is used as both current and long-term compensation, while non-cash compensation (i.e., share-based awards) is generally used only for long-term compensation. Cash compensation includes base salary, annual incentive awards and performance units, which are cash-based awards payable at the end of three years subject to attainment of certain corporate performance targets. Non-cash compensation includes stock option grants and restricted share grants. The allocation between cash and non-cash compensation is primarily based on competitive market practices for individual program elements, including salary, annual incentive compensation and long-term incentive grants, and the company’s policy with respect to allocating between the different types of long-term incentive grants, including cash-based long-term performance units, restricted shares and stock options. Compensation tied to equity is intended to align the recipient’s interests with shareholders and cause changes in stock price to have a meaningful impact on the recipient’s personal wealth. Similar to the mix between current and long-term compensation, the Company does not target a fixed allocation between cash and non-cash compensation by position but rather looks at each element of pay and -16-
  18. 18. determines the appropriate mix of cash and non-cash based on market and internal considerations. As a result, the allocation varies by management level. For example, the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman each receive approximately 55% to 60% of total target compensation in the form of cash compensation and the remaining 40% to 45% in non-cash compensation. In comparison, the other named- executive officers receive 65% to 70% of total target compensation in the form of cash compensation and 30% to 35% in non-cash compensation. The mix of compensation ultimately realized by the executives is determined by a combination of individual, team and company performance over time. There are several factors that the Company evaluates in determining increases or decreases in compensation. These may include: promotions, individual performance, market compensation trends (such as changes in typical target annual incentive levels or changes in market long-term incentive values), and internal considerations such as changes in the executive’s responsibility. The amount of past compensation realized or potentially realizable does not directly impact the level at which future pay opportunities have been set. The Company annually reviews survey data from nationally recognized consulting firms. Collectively, these databases reflect the pay practices of hundreds of companies. In setting the compensation for the Company’s executive officers for 2006, the Compensation Committee conducted a review of total compensation provided by companies with net sales between $3 and $6 billion dollars. The Company believes that the size and complexity of the organization should be reflected in how compensation is determined. On the basis of guidance from Towers Perrin, the Company’s external compensation advisor, company revenues are viewed as the most reliable predictor of pay available to capture differences in size and scope among companies, which is why the market data are adjusted based on revenues. Guidelines for salaries, annual incentives and long-term incentive grants are based on the 50th percentile of the general industry data specific to each position. In some instances, the Company may provide compensation above or below the 50th percentile for a particular element for a particular position, based on previously-mentioned internal factors, including the executive’s operating responsibilities, management level, retention risk and tenure and performance in the position. The Company believes that targeting pay at the median in aggregate and adjusting pay above or below median for individual positions provides the proper balance between establishing fair and reasonable pay levels and requiring that performance exceed expectations in order to deliver pay that is higher than that provided by the majority of companies in the comparison group. The Chief Executive Officer and the Senior Vice President - Human Resources and Organizational Advancement prepare compensation recommendations for the named executive officers (other than the Chief Executive Officer and Chairman positions) and present these recommendations to the Compensation Committee. The Chief Executive Officer’s and Chairman’s compensation packages are determined by the Compensation Committee and approved by the independent members of the Board of Directors during executive session. The Company compares each element of compensation provided to its executive officers to the market data, and considers the total compensation package in relation to the target established for the position. Following completion of this analysis and development of proposed base salary ranges, target annual performance award opportunities and long-term incentive grants, an external compensation consultant reviews the information and discusses the findings with the Compensation Committee. The Committee then approves, with any modifications it deems appropriate, base salary ranges, target annual performance award opportunities and long-term incentive grants for the Company’s executive officers. As part of this process, the Compensation Committee reviews all the components of the Chief Executive Officer’s and the other named executive officers’ compensation and determines that each individual’s total compensation is reasonable and consistent with the Company’s compensation philosophy. The company analyzes the overall expense arising from aggregate executive compensation levels and awards and the components of the Company’s pay, as well as the accounting and tax treatment of such programs. The Company has addressed the impact of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) by obtaining shareholder approval of the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan and the Long-Term Incentive Plan and by allowing certain grants under the Long-Term Incentive Plan to qualify as performance-based compensation. The Chief Executive Officer and the other named executive officers all participated in the Senior Executive Management Performance plan for 2006. The Compensation -17-
  19. 19. Committee considers the deductibility of compensation and benefits for Federal income tax purposes, along with other relevant factors, when determining executive compensation practices. Base Salary The base salary component of executive compensation is intended to reflect an individual’s competencies, skills, experience and performance. Base salary ranges for executive officers are determined by the Compensation Committee based on external surveys of salary practices for positions with similar levels of responsibility and in consultation with an external compensation consultant. At least annually, the Committee reviews the base salary amounts for the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman in light of their experience, leadership and performance in relation to the performance of the Company, position in the salary range and internal equity considerations and then makes recommendations regarding their base salaries to the full Board for approval. The Compensation Committee also reviews and approves, with any modifications it deems appropriate, the recommendations of the Chief Executive Officer regarding individual base salary amounts for each of the other named executive officers based on the same factors. Following this review process in 2006, the Compensation Committee determined that no base salary adjustment was required for the Chief Executive Officer or the Chairman in light of current market data and the desired emphasis on incentive pay for these positions. The other named executive officers received increases in their base salaries that ranged from 5.4% to 13.6%, based on the factors discussed above. The Committee also considered internal equity among the positions in coming to these decisions. Annual Performance Award The Company's Senior Executive Management Performance Plan provides the named executive officers with the opportunity to earn annual incentive compensation based on the achievement of corporate performance goals established by the Compensation Committee and approved by the Board of Directors. It is intended to focus the named executive officers on specific performance goals in the current year. For 2006, the Chief Executive Officer and the other named executive officers all participated in the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan. The plan provided a target award opportunity of 100% of base salary for the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman and 60% of base salary for the other named executive officers, although the actual awards could be higher or lower than the target depending upon the attainment of the goals. The Company also has a Management Performance Plan for other executive officers and key employees that provides an annual incentive opportunity based on measures and goals similar to those of the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan. The Compensation Committee establishes the performance goals each year based upon business plans approved by management and reviewed with the Board of Directors as well as competitive market practice. The performance goals may differ from the business plan in a given year, but are intended to reflect desired performance over the course of a full business cycle. Accordingly, goals are established with the objective of paying approximately at target, on average, over a full business cycle, with a low probability of either failing to reach threshold levels or reaching maximum levels. For 2006, the primary performance measurement was return on invested capital, defined as earnings before interest and taxes as a percentage of beginning invested capital (“EBIT/BIC”), excluding the effects of restructuring and impairment charges and accounting changes as defined by generally accepted accounting principles. The Committee believes that EBIT/BIC is closely correlated with the creation of shareholder value. This measure is considered at the corporate level and for each business unit, although for 2006 all named executive officers were measured only on corporate EBIT/BIC performance. This measure constituted 80% of the total award calculation for the Senior Executive Management Plan in 2006. In addition, specific goals may be established for other key measures that the Compensation Committee identifies as being aligned with the creation of shareholder value. For 2006, the Compensation Committee selected working capital as a percentage of sales as an additional measure for the named executive officers. This measure constituted 20% of the total award calculation for the Senior Executive Management Plan in 2006. A minimum level of performance for each measure is established each year, below which no annual performance awards are earned. Bonuses paid to individual executives are based on the actual financial -18-
  20. 20. results in relation to the target goals under the plan. In addition, the Committee retains the discretion to adjust downward any awards determined by the formula as the Committee deems appropriate. Results in 2006 exceeded the threshold performance necessary for annual performance awards to be earned under the Senior Executive Management Plan. The Compensation Committee considered the performance of each named executive officer in relation to his or her individual goals as well as internal pay equity and determined to use its negative discretion under the plan to adjust the awards, resulting in final cash awards of approximately 100% of target for the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman and 64% to 134% of target for the other named executive officers. The goals for the annual performance award plans for 2007 were set by the Compensation Committee at the February 2007 meeting. The performance measures for the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan for 2007 are corporate EBIT/BIC and working capital as a percentage of sales. Corporate EBIT/BIC will constitute 80% of the total award calculation, while working capital as a percentage of sales will constitute 20% of the total award calculation in 2007. The Compensation Committee selected the Chief Executive Officer, the other named executive officers and Salvatore J. Miraglia, Jr., President – Steel, as the participants in the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan for 2007. The target award opportunity for 2007 is 100% of base salary for the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman and 60% of base salary for the other named executive officers, although the actual awards could be higher or lower than the target percentages depending upon the attainment of corporate, business unit and individual goals. Long-Term Incentives The Compensation Committee administers the Long-Term Incentive Plan, which was last approved by shareholders effective April 20, 2004. Awards under the Long-Term Incentive Plan can be made in the form of non-qualified stock options, incentive stock options, appreciation rights, performance shares, performance units, restricted shares and deferred shares. In 2006, the Company utilized three different types of long-term incentive grants for executive officers: • Performance units, which are designed to reward executives with cash payments contingent on the attainment of specified multi-year corporate performance goals; • Nonqualified stock options, which vest over time (typically four years) and are granted with the intent to provide value to the holder only if shareholders receive additional value after the date of grant; and • Restricted shares, which also vest over time (typically four years) and are granted in order to foster stock ownership among executives, create a retention mechanism, and focus executives on total shareholder return (including dividends). In total, the Company believes that these three programs provide a balanced perspective on shareholder value creation and retention of key managers over the course of a full business cycle. These programs also serve to balance the short-term operating focus of the Company. The value of each type of long-term incentive grant is linked directly to the performance of the Company or the price of Common Stock. For performance units, payouts are entirely contingent on the attainment of corporate performance targets over a three-year performance period. No payments are made under this program unless the threshold level of performance is achieved on two distinct performance measures. In the case of stock options, the recipient recognizes value only to the extent that the stock price increases above the market price of the stock at the time the option is granted. And for restricted shares, value is directly related to the stock price and dividends paid by the Company. Guideline grant levels for each of the three forms of long-term incentive were established in 2004 and have been held constant since that time. The guidelines were established in order to deliver a total value, at grant, equal to each executive’s targeted level of long-term incentive value as defined using prevailing market practice. The allocation of grant value between the three long-term incentive programs was based on a combination of market practice, internal equity considerations and relative importance of the objectives behind each of the three programs (i.e., reward attainment of multi-year performance goals, provide value tied to stock price appreciation, foster stock ownership and retention). -19-
  21. 21. On average, for the named executive officers, each of the Company’s long-term incentive vehicles represents approximately one-third of the total long-term incentive value. For the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman, however, there is greater emphasis placed on the stock option component, with their long- term incentive mix being approximately 30% in cash-based performance units, 40% in stock options and 30% in restricted shares. This allocation reflects the Company’s belief that the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman, more than other officers, are directly accountable for long-term shareholder value creation. Performance units, stock options and restricted shares are typically granted by the Compensation Committee during the first quarter of each year, when the Committee determines all elements of the officers’ compensation for the year. Approval of grants for newly hired or promoted executives during the course of the year occurs at the Compensation Committee meeting immediately following the hiring or promotion. Performance Units The three-year performance cycle for performance units starts on January 1 of each year. Cash payouts in respect of performance units are made by March following the end of each performance cycle. The performance measures used for the performance units granted in 2006 are return on equity and sales growth over the 2006-2008 performance cycle. Each measure is weighted equally. The goals for each measure are tied to the Company’s three-year strategic plan. The target award opportunity for the performance units granted in 2006 is 100% of base salary (as of January 1, 2006) for the Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman and ranges from 70% to 80% of base salary (as of January 1, 2006) for the other named executive officers, although the actual awards could be higher or lower than the target percentages depending upon the attainment of the goals. For the performance units covering the 2004-2006 performance cycle, which were granted in 2004 and also used the performance measures of return on equity and sales growth, performance of both measures exceeded the target performance level. Achievement of results against the pre-established targets resulted in an award of 150% of target level. The Chief Executive Officer received a cash award of 150% of base salary in effect on January 1, 2004 and the other named executive officers received cash awards that ranged from 105% to 120% of base salary in effect on January 1, 2004. Under the accounting rules, performance units result in variable accounting, whereby the Company’s expense equals the value paid to the executives. As such, the ultimate expense is not determinable until the end of the three-year performance period. When the executives earn and receive a payout, the Company receives a corresponding tax deduction. Stock Options Executives (including the named executive officers) receive nonqualified stock options that: • have an exercise price equal to the fair market value of Common Stock on the date of grant; • typically vest over a four-year period in equal amounts each year; and • expire ten years after the date of grant. Under the accounting rules, the value of the stock options at the time of grant is expensed over the vesting period in the year the options are earned. When executives exercise stock options, they are taxed at ordinary income tax rates (subject to withholding) and the Company receives a corresponding tax deduction. Restricted Shares Executives (including the named executive officers) receive restricted shares that typically vest over a four year period in equal amounts each year. Under the accounting rules, the grant date fair value is expensed over the service/vesting period based on the shares that are earned. The executives are taxed at ordinary income tax rates (subject to withholding) when the shares vest, and the Company receives a corresponding tax deduction. Share ownership targets have been established for all senior executives and are intended to align the interests of executive management with those of shareholders by requiring executives to be subject to long- -20-
  22. 22. term stock price volatility like shareholders. These targets set a specific level of ownership ranging for named executive officers from 3 to 5 times the executive’s base salary, to be achieved in most cases within five years of the date the guidelines become applicable to the named executive officer. The Company recognizes all shares owned by the executive, including restricted shares still subject to forfeiture but not including shares that are subject to unexercised option rights, in determining whether ownership targets have been met. The Company has a formal policy that prohibits hedging the economic risk related to such stock ownership. Retirement Income Programs The Company maintains both qualified and nonqualified retirement income programs. The named executive officers participate in qualified plans on the same terms and conditions as all other salaried employees and also participate in the Company’s nonqualified retirement income programs. The Company currently provides nonqualified retirement income through two types of plans: • Nonqualified defined contribution plan, which provides for after-tax savings based on each executive’s contributions, company match and core defined contributions in excess of tax limits. The nonqualified defined contribution plan in which the named executive officers participate is the Post-Tax Savings Plan. • Nonqualified defined benefit plan, which provides for a targeted percentage of salary and annual incentive income that will be continued through retirement. The nonqualified defined benefit plan in which the named executive officers participate is the Supplemental Executive Retirement Program for Executive Officers (the “SERP”). The SERP provides for a benefit based on final average earnings with offsets for benefits provided under the Company’s other retirement programs. The nonqualified retirement income benefits are primarily intended to restore benefits that otherwise would be provided under the qualified retirement plans were it not for limits on benefits and compensation imposed by the Internal Revenue Code. The value of the nonqualified retirement income programs is quantified each year and these programs are periodically reviewed for their competitiveness. To date, the value of these programs has not had a significant impact on decisions regarding salary, annual incentive awards or long-term incentive grants. Termination-Related Payments In addition to retirement payments, the company provides termination-related payments in the event of involuntary termination without cause and involuntary termination without cause following a change in control. The Company provides payments in the event of involuntary termination without cause through Severance Agreements with individual executives. Severance Agreements are provided based on competitive market practice and the Company’s desire to provide some level of income continuity should an executive’s employment be terminated without cause. The Company believes that providing for such income continuity results in greater management stability and lower unwanted management turnover. Severance Agreements also provide for termination payments following involuntary termination without cause following a change in control. These provisions are based on competitive practice and are designed to ensure that executives’ interests remain aligned with shareholders should a potential change of control occur. They are also intended to provide some level of income continuity should an executive’s employment be terminated without cause. The Company believes that providing for such income continuity results in greater management stability and lower unwanted management turnover. Deferred Compensation The Company maintains a Deferred Compensation Plan that allows certain employees, including the named executive officers, to defer receipt of all or a portion of their salary, employee contributions and company match that would otherwise be directed to the Post-Tax Savings and Investment Plan and/or incentive compensation payable in cash or shares of Common Stock until a specified point in the future. Cash deferrals earn interest quarterly at a rate based on the prime rate plus one percent. The Deferred Compensation Plan is not funded by the Company and participants have an unsecured contractual -21-
  23. 23. commitment by the Company to pay the amounts due under the plan. When such payments are due, they will be distributed from the Company’s general assets. In the event of a change in control in the Company, as defined in the plan, participants are entitled to receive deferred amounts immediately. The Company believes that providing employees with tax deferral opportunities aids in the attraction and retention of such employees. The value of deferred compensation amounts is quantified each year and this program is periodically reviewed for its competitiveness. To date, the value of deferred compensation has not had a significant impact on decisions regarding salary, annual incentive awards or long-term incentive grants. Perquisite Programs The Company’s executive officers, including all of the named executive officers, are eligible to participate in a number of broad-based benefit programs, including health, disability and life insurance programs. The named executive officers may also receive certain perquisites including term life insurance coverage, financial counseling and tax preparation, annual physical examinations, country club membership fees (although personal expenses are not reimbursed) and home security systems. These items are intended to provide executives with a competitive perquisite program. -22-
  24. 24. SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE The following table sets forth information concerning compensation for the Company’s principal executive officer, principal financial officer and three other most highly compensated executive officers for 2006. Change in Pension Value and Non-Equity Stock Option All Other Incentive Plan Nonqualified Name and Principal Awards Awards Compensation Year Salary Total Compensation Deferred Position (1) (2) (5) (3) Compensation Earnings ($) (4) James W. Griffith 2006 $950,000 $798,103 $1,068,120 $2,300,000 $1,414,000 $124,044 $6,654,267 President and Chief Executive Officer Ward J. Timken, Jr. 2006 $750,000 $311,847 $398,519 $1,182,000 $314,000 $137,630 $3,093,996 Chairman of the Board Glenn A. Eisenberg Executive Vice 2006 $570,833 $314,946 $255,945 $1,004,000 $219,000 $126,071 $2,490,795 President - Finance and Administration Michael C. Arnold 2006 $473,333 $400,161 $219,381 $810,500 $467,000 $64,952 $2,435,327 President - Industrial Jacqueline A. Dedo 2006 $416,667 $241,230 $281,985 $553,750 $139,000 $53,358 $1,685,990 President - Automotive (1) The amounts shown in this column represent the FAS123R compensation expense recognized in 2006 in connection with grants of deferred dividend equivalents, restricted shares and deferred shares to the named executive officers, excluding the effect of certain forfeiture assumptions. These amounts represent expense recognized in 2006 for financial reporting purposes related to awards granted from 2002-2006. Awards of restricted and deferred shares typically vest and are amortized over a 4-year period, with the exception of Mrs. Dedo’s 2004 restricted share grant of 25,000 shares that vested 6,000 shares per year on each anniversary date of her hire in 2005 and 2006, with the remaining 13,000 vesting in 2007 and Mr. Eisenberg’s 2002 restricted share grant of 50,000 shares that vested at a rate of 6,000 shares per year, on each anniversary date of hire for 2003 through 2006, with the remaining 26,000 shares vesting on the fifth anniversary of the grant. Options granted by the Company prior to April 2002 provided for deferred dividend equivalents to be earned when total net income per share of the outstanding Common Stock is at least two and one-half times (or two times in the case of options granted prior to 1996) the total amount of cash dividends paid per share during the relevant calendar year. Deferred dividend equivalents are not traditional restricted stock, but deferred shares with no voting or statutory dividend rights. The deferred shares are subject to forfeiture until issuance, which occurs four years after the date they are earned provided the grantee remains continuously employed by the Company. These grants are amortized over a 4-year period. The amount shown for Mr. Griffith includes expense booked in 2006 for 8,439 deferred dividend equivalents granted in 2004 and 2005 and 150,000 restricted shares granted from 2002 to 2006; the amount shown for Mr. Timken includes expense for 1,477 deferred dividend equivalents and 54,000 restricted shares; the amount shown for Mr. Eisenberg includes expense for and 439 deferred dividend equivalents and 86,000 restricted shares; the amount shown for Mr. Arnold includes 2,658 deferred -23-
  25. 25. dividend equivalents, 45,000 restricted shares, and 25,000 deferred shares; and the amount shown for Mrs. Dedo includes expense for 45,000 restricted shares. FAS 123R compensation expense is determined based on the fair market value of Common Stock, which is the average of the high and low price of the Common Stock on the date of the grant. See also our discussion of Stock Compensation Plans in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements contained in footnote 9 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006. Dividends are paid on restricted shares at the same rate as paid to all shareholders. (2) The amounts shown in this column represent the FAS 123R compensation expense for nonqualified stock options granted from 2004 to 2006, excluding the effect of certain forfeiture assumptions. Stock options vest at a rate of 25% per year. Options granted prior to 2006 were amortized over a period of 30 months. Beginning in 2006, all new grants are amortized over a four year period for FAS 123R. The value shown for Mr. Griffith includes expense for the unamortized portion of 402,000 shares granted from 2004 to 2006; the value shown for Mr. Timken includes expense for 165,000 aggregate shares; the value shown for Mr. Eisenberg includes expense for 105,000 aggregate shares; the value shown for Mr. Arnold includes expense for 90,000 aggregate shares; and the value shown for Mrs. Dedo includes expense for 125,000 aggregate shares. Assumptions used to determine expense for nonqualified stock options are listed in the discussion of Stock Compensation Plans in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements contained in footnote 9 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006. (3) The amounts shown in this column represent cash awards under a) the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan (annual incentive plan) for 2006 and b) performance units under the Long-Term Incentive Plan covering the 2004-2006 performance cycle. Amounts earned under the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan and performance units, respectively, for each of the named executive officers was as follows: Mr. Griffith - $950,000 and $1,350,000; Mr. Timken - $750,000 and $432,000; Mr. Eisenberg - $380,000 and $624,000; Mr. Arnold - $380,000 and $430,500; and Mrs. Dedo - $160,000 and $393,750. (4) The amounts shown in this column represent the difference between the amounts shown in the Pension Benefits table below as of December 31, 2006 and those amounts calculated as of December 31, 2005. See the discussion of Pension Benefits below for a description of how the amounts as of December 31, 2006 were calculated. The amounts as of December 31, 2005 were calculated using the same assumptions, except that mortality was based on the 1983 Group Annuity Mortality Table rather than the RP-2000 Mortality Table. For both years, liabilities were determined assuming no probability of termination, retirement, death, or disability before age 62 (the earliest age unreduced pension benefits are payable from the plans). None of the named executive officers earned above-market earnings in a deferred compensation plan. (5) The amounts shown in this column are derived as follows: Mr. Griffith: $9,900 annual contribution by the Company to the Savings and Investment Pension Plan (“SIP Plan”). $97,875 annual contribution by the Company to the Post-Tax Savings Plan. $2,308 reimbursement by the Company for financial planning expenses. The maximum annual allowance is $10,000. $458 related to charges for home security monitoring fees which the Company requires. $6,904 annual life insurance premium paid by the Company. $3,604 in tax gross ups related to financial planning allowance and spousal travel. $2,027 related to reimbursement for spousal travel. $968 related to personal use of the Company plane. Mr. Timken: $9,900 annual contribution by the Company to the SIP Plan. $89,250 annual contribution by the Company to the Post-Tax Savings Plan. $6,600 annual contribution by the Company to the core defined contribution retirement income program. -24-
  26. 26. $9,940 reimbursement by the Company for financial planning expenses. The maximum annual allowance is $10,000. $1,957 for reimbursement of expenses related to a Company mandated annual physical. $379 related to charges for home security monitoring fees which the Company requires. $6,568 annual life insurance premium paid by the Company. $5,423 in tax gross ups related to financial planning allowance and spousal travel. $7,058 related to reimbursement for spousal travel. $555 in country club related fees reimbursed by the Company. Mr. Eisenberg: $9,900 annual contribution by the Company to the SIP Plan. $63,438 annual contribution by the Company to the Post-Tax Savings Plan. $6,600 annual contribution by the Company to the core defined contribution retirement income program. $7,500 reimbursement by the Company for financial planning expenses. The maximum annual allowance is $7,500. $3,509 for reimbursement of expenses related to a Company mandated annual physical. $319 related to charges for home security monitoring fees which the Company requires. $22,873 annual life insurance premium paid by the Company. $4,423 in tax gross ups related to financial planning allowance and spousal travel. $94 related to reimbursement for spousal travel. $7,415 in country club membership fees reimbursed by the Company. Mr. Arnold: $9,900 annual contribution by the Company to the SIP Plan. $30,975 annual contribution by the Company to the Post-Tax Savings Plan. $168 related to charges for home security monitoring fees which the Company requires. $13,049 annual life insurance premium paid by the Company. $1,079 in tax gross ups related to spousal travel. $1,021 related to reimbursement for spousal travel. $8,760 in country club membership fees reimbursed by the Company. Mrs. Dedo: $9,900 annual contribution by the Company to the SIP Plan. $17,049 annual contribution by the Company to the Post-Tax Savings Plan. $6,600 annual contribution by the Company to the core defined contribution retirement income program. $1,115 reimbursement by the Company for financial planning expenses. The maximum annual allowance is $7,500. $1,267 for reimbursement of expenses related to a Company mandated annual physical. $1,128 related to charges for home security monitoring fees which the Company requires. $1,328 in tax gross ups related to financial planning allowance and spousal travel. $8,791 related to reimbursement for spousal travel. $6,180 in country club membership fees reimbursed by the Company. -25-
  27. 27. 2006 GRANTS OF PLAN-BASED AWARDS The following table sets forth information concerning certain grants made to the named executive officers during 2006. Name Grant All Other All Other Exercise Fair Date Stock Option or Base Market Awards: Awards: Price of Value of Estimated Future Payouts Under Non- Number of Number of Option Awards Equity Incentive Plan Awards Shares of Securities Awards Granted in Stock or Underlying 2006 Units Options (5) Threshold Target Maximum (3) (4) ($) ($) ($) (1) James W. Griffith 2/6/2006 $712,500 $950,000 $1,900,000 31,536 134,000 $30.93 $2,257,882 (2) $152,000 $950,000 $2,375,000 (1) Ward J. Timken, Jr. 2/6/2006 $562,500 $750,000 $1,500,000 27,731 114,000 $30.93 $1,949,749 (2) $120,000 $750,000 $1,875,000 (1) Glenn A. Eisenberg 2/6/2006 $330,000 $440,000 $880,000 12,009 35,000 $30.93 $707,073 (2) $55,200 $345,000 $862,500 (1) Michael C. Arnold 2/6/2006 $231,000 $308,000 $616,000 35,718 30,000 $30.93 $1,391,249 (2) $46,080 $288,000 $720,000 (1) Jacqueline A. Dedo 2/6/2006 $210,000 $280,000 $560,000 10,000 30,000 $30.93 $597,000 (2) $40,320 $252,000 $630,000 (1) The amounts shown indicate threshold, target and maximum awards for performance units covering the 2006-2008 performance cycle granted to each named executive officer in 2006 under the Long-Term Incentive Plan. Payment of awards is subject to the attainment of return on equity and sales growth targets over the 2006-2008 performance cycle. Each measure is weighted equally. For any payment to be earned, the actual performance during the performance cycle must exceed the threshold performance levels for both return on equity and sales growth. If the threshold performance level for either measure is not attained, then no payment will occur. If an award is payable, the minimum award is 75% of target and the maximum award is 200% of target. Payments may be made in cash or shares of Common Stock, as determined by the Compensation Committee. (2) The amounts shown indicate threshold, target and maximum awards under the Senior Executive Management Performance Plan for 2006. The Senior Executive Management Plan is a shareholder- approved plan in which all the named executive officers participated in 2006. The performance metrics for 2006 were corporate EBIT/BIC and working capital as a percentage of sales. A minimum level of performance for each measure is established each year, below which no annual performance awards are earned. Bonuses paid to individual executives are based on the actual financial results in relation to the target goals under the plan. In addition, the Committee retains the discretion to adjust downward any awards determined by the formula as the Committee deems appropriate. (3) The amounts shown include restricted shares granted in 2006, as follows: Mr. Griffith – 30,000 shares; Mr. Timken – 27,000 shares; Mr. Eisenberg – 12,000 shares; Mr. Arnold – 10,000 shares; and Mrs. Dedo – 10,000 shares. These restricted shares will vest over four years in 25% increments on the anniversary date of the grant. Dividends are paid on all restricted shares at the same rate as shares of Common Stock generally. The amount shown for Mr. Arnold also includes 25,000 deferred shares granted in 2006 that will vest in full on the fourth anniversary of the date of grant. The remaining amounts are deferred dividend equivalents earned in 2006, which are subject to forfeiture until four years after the date they are earned. -26-
  28. 28. (4) All options granted to the named executive officers in the last fiscal year were granted on February 6, 2006. All options were granted pursuant to the Long-Term Incentive Plan with an exercise price equal to the fair market value (as defined in the plan) on the date of grant, have a ten year term and will become exercisable over four years in 25% increments on the anniversary date of the grant. The agreements pertaining to these options provide that such options will become exercisable in full and will vest in the event of normal retirement, early retirement with the Company’s consent, death or disability of the option holder or a change in control of the Company, in each case as defined in such agreements. The rules on executive compensation disclosure issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission authorize the use of variations of the Black-Scholes option-pricing model in valuing executive stock options. The Company used this model to estimate the grant date present value of $9.59. In applying this model, basic assumptions were made concerning variables such as expected option term, interest rates, stock price volatility and future dividend yield, to establish an estimated option value. There is, of course, no assurance that the value actually realized by an executive will be at or near the estimated value, because the actual value, if any, an executive may realize will depend on the excess of the stock price over the exercise price on the date the option is exercised. The following assumptions were used in establishing the option value for the options granted on February 6, 2006: (a) an option term of 5 years, which is the expected life of the option based on historical experience of stock option exercises at the Company; (b) an interest rate of 4.53%, which corresponds to the yield to maturity on an 5-year U.S. zero coupon bond as of February 10, 2006; (c) volatility of .35, calculated using the daily-ending stock prices for 5 years prior to the grant date; and (d) dividend yield of 2.14%, the average amount paid annually over the 5 years prior to grant date. These assumptions are not a forecast of future stock price or volatility or of future dividend policy. (5) The values shown are derived by aggregating the fair market value of restricted shares, deferred shares and deferred dividend equivalents granted in 2006 and the fair market value of the nonqualified stock options. The fair market value of restricted shares, deferred shares and deferred dividend equivalents is the average of the high and low price of Common Stock on the date of grant multiplied by the number of full shares granted. The fair market value of the nonqualified stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes model. -27-

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