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integrys 2002_wpsr

  1. 1. E V E RY W H E R E YO U L O O K STORIES OF COMMUNITY 2 0 0 2 C O M M U N I T Y I N V O LV E M E N T R E P O R T WPS Resources Corporation
  2. 2. CONTENTS 1 A MESSAGE FROM OUR PRESIDENT — MY STORY. YOUR STORY. OUR STORY ... ARTS & CULTURE 2 ONTONAGON THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS COMMUNITY & CIVIC AFFAIRS 4 THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES 6 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WOMEN’S BUILD 8 RURAL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM FOR OLDER PERSONS ENVIRONMENT, EDUCATION & LIFELONG LEARNING 10 THE EINSTEIN PROJECT 12 FOX RIVER TRAIL FISHING PIER 13 THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - ELECTRICITY MERIT BADGE CLINIC 14 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN OUR COMMUNITIES 18 WPS RESOURCES CORPORATION Pictured on cover: Generation-next scientists from Danz Elementary School, Green Bay, discover the world with units from The Einstein Project. (See related story, pg. 10) W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  3. 3. FROM LARRY WEYERS, CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT & CEO MY STORY. YOUR STORY. OUR STORY ... EVERYWHERE YOU LOOK ... there are remarkable people who seem to care more, dream more, give more. These are the individuals who transform the places we call home. Theirs are the initiatives we empower through WPS Resources Corporation. Here, in their own words, grassroots volunteers and leaders tell how funding from the WPS Resources Foundation makes a difference in our communities. Their stories are as diverse as the projects themselves. Yet through them runs a singular current: a strong commitment to creating a better world, right in their own backyard. WPS Resources Corporation is proud to invest in a powerful form of alternative energy — the passion of volunteers, program directors and community leaders who generate positive change. The results are everywhere you look. LARRY L. WEYERS Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N 1
  4. 4. ARTS & CULTURE “When you have an event at the theatre and you watch hundreds of people come in and sit down and applaud, it just makes it all worthwhile.” CAROL REID President, Ontonagon Theatre of the Performing Arts Ontonagon, MI 2 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  5. 5. ONTONAGON THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS FOR YEARS, THE ONTONAGON THEATRE In a phased, multi-year project, a newly SAT NEGLECTED, re-muddled and forgotten in the formed board of local visionaries Ontonagon Township Memorial Building. Once the pride of renovated the historic theatre through the community, the theatre was converted to office space tenacious pursuit of grants and pure and later lay abandoned. Yet thanks to WPS Resources’ sweat equity. From funding by subsidiary, Upper Peninsula WPS Resources Foundation, UPPCO and a handful of “I believed there should Power Company (UPPCO), other local businesses to in-kind donations from construction be a place for people in and a spirited troupe of firms to volunteers wielding paintbrushes, the community our area to showcase volunteers, the theatre’s created a magnificent showcase for performing arts. their talent.” script has been rewritten. Today, the recently opened Ontonagon Theatre of the In 1997, self-acknowledged “ham” and amateur actress Carol Performing Arts is center stage for a wide variety of live Reid took the stage. Together with volunteer Janet Wolfe of performances. It is home to high school plays, symphonies, UPPCO and four other volunteers, Reid outlined a plan to talent shows, Dixieland jazz, country music stars, quilt shows, reclaim the theatre, creating a venue to benefit the entire graduation ceremonies, and even a wedding. The Theatre is community, young and old, performer and spectator alike. performing a remarkable encore, rekindling culture, reuniting community and revitalizing economic development throughout the area. “ “When I returned from California, community plays were held in the school cafeteria. The acoustics were children had a place to perform and gain confidence to pretty poor, and you had to set up folding chairs. stay with them the rest of their lives. That’s what happens I got tired of yelling my lines. So I thought, when you get up in front of a whole bunch of people. ‘Whatever happened to our theatre?’ “So I went out and I found five people to make up “I checked it out, and discovered it was really all still a board. We started out with no money but with there, just hidden. The balcony was up above false wonderful, wonderful support. We’ve all worked long ceilings, the stage was behind a wall. I remembered and hard to accomplish this, and our community has what the Memorial Building meant to the people of come close together. this community. I wanted to save that theatre. “When you have an event at the theatre and you watch “I believed there should be a place for people in our area hundreds of people come in and sit down and applaud, to showcase their talent. I wanted to see that the school it just makes it all worthwhile.”— CAROL REID
  6. 6. COMMUNITY & CIVIC AFFAIRS “They’re some of the best animals in the world. We couldn’t let anything stop us.” JOANN CASEY Volunteer and Activist, Humane Society of Vilas County Elementary students from Eagle River’s nationally recognized Earth Base Recycling Center and Club use proceeds from recycled cans, plastic bags and other materials to support community animal organizations. 4 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  7. 7. THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY ONE DAY, THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY Rescuing the Vilas County Animal learned that a “No Vacancy” sign would soon go up on the Shelter quickly became a critical Vilas County Animal Shelter. The facility, housed in a municipal focus. The county program — which building, was needed for other obligations. And the county handled an average of more than seriously considered closing the program. 500 canines and felines a year — was central to area animal welfare. Members were stunned. The Humane Society provided ongoing fundraising to underwrite spaying and neutering at The Society spearheaded the facility. Many members volunteered to care for the animals an aggressive capital “I’ve adopted three animals at the shelter. And supporting the shelter was an important campaign to build a new over the years which have part of the Humane Society’s outreach to advocate responsible facility. Instead of the come from shelters.” pet ownership, which also included visiting area schools to stereotypical shelter with rows of steel cages, the campaign teach children about taking proper care of animals. called for a new 2,500-square-foot building with specialized environments like a cat colony, indoor/outdoor dog kennels, and a quiet whelping room for animals giving birth. Thanks in part to a grant from WPS Resources Foundation, the Vilas County Animal Shelter has found a new lease on life. “ “The word got out that the county was just going to Groundbreaking for the shelter is slated for spring of 2003. close the animal shelter. And that wasn’t acceptable For animal lovers and activists like JoAnn Casey, it was the to us. The Humane Society decided to do a capital only humane thing to do. campaign for a building. And there wasn’t going to be anything we would let stop us. There are no rules when you care so much about something. “There’s a sense of satisfaction that you can make a “A lot of times, animals might be losing their homes difference. Maybe a dog or a cat comes through the through no fault of their own. It’s a low-income area, door, and you find a perfect fit, a person that will care for and people are looking for assistance. Sometimes their them the way they should be cared for. The animals can circumstances change and they can’t afford to feed their somehow sense that they’ve been given a second chance. own family, let alone a pet. We need to give people in desperate situations an option, rather than adding to “The last three animals that I’ve adopted have come from the hardship. shelters. I don’t know what it is, but I think they’re some of the best animals in the world.” — JO CASEY
  8. 8. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES “We found ourselves doing things we hadn’t done before and didn’t think we could do.” BARBARA LEMEROND Senior Organizational Development Consultant 2002 Women’s Build Volunteer, Habitat for Humanity 6 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  9. 9. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WOMEN’S BUILD FROM START TO FINISH, IT WAS A “WOMAN THING,” organize a work team from the corporation. Soon, she was in a house built for a woman, solely by women. the thick of the fray, serving on the task force responsible for planning and implementing the build, and co-chairing the The Women’s Build Habitat for Humanity home — one of committee that organized the volunteers. During the build, three Habitat projects supported by WPS Resources in 2003 — Barb was also on-site, was constructed during a “Blitz Build” July 20-27 on Green swinging a hammer and Bay’s near-west side. More than 450 women, 40 of them muscling materials. employees of Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, a subsidiary of WPS Resources, experienced an intense Lemerond says the one-week crash course in hands-on construction. The women Women’s Build home framed the house, insulated, installed windows and siding, confirmed her dream. shingled the roof and more, with coaching, but with no other In giving their time, the “How lucky for me that I outside assistance. women received an equal found an organization where gift: the chance to build on strengths within themselves. It was a challenge I could grow my career while in more ways than being valued for volunteering.“ one. Temperatures “The Women’s Build was a tremendous opportunity for soared to 100° plus. Schedules were compressed. And the women to do an entire project on our own — from volunteers pushed the limits of their strength and confidence. beginning to end — in areas outside our comfort level. We found ourselves doing things we hadn’t done before One of the volunteers was Wisconsin Public Service’s employee and didn’t think we could do. Barbara Lemerond. She began the project with the intent to “Women stepped forward, with more confidence, accomplishing what they would not normally do under other circumstances. A lot of us recognized that not only were we better at particular (building) skills than we “ “I have been involved with the issue of diversity through thought, we were stronger physically too. We had to be. my position at Wisconsin Public Service, and diversity There was no one to fall back on. We worked as a team includes the issues of women. So when I heard about the and figured things out. idea for a Women’s Build, I thought it was a wonderful “How lucky for me that I found an organization where way to gain women’s involvement in a ‘non-traditional’ I could grow my career while being valued for field. The project offered a means for women to develop volunteering.”— BARB LEMEROND different skills and become involved in and valued for something that is new for us.
  10. 10. “There are a lot of people who don’t have anybody. The only way they get out is with that van.” PEARL HIRTE Volunteer, Bus Captain Beecher, WI 8 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  11. 11. MARINETTE COUNTY ELDERLY SERVICES RURAL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM FOR OLDER PERSONS IMAGINE LIVING IN THE ISOLATED WOODS The Marinette County Elderly Services buses AND FARMLANDS OF NORTHERN WISCONSIN. drive several routes weekly Imagine being elderly, homebound, unable to drive. throughout the county and Then imagine the welcome sight of a small bus rumbling up make more than 8,000 trips a the driveway, providing a ready-made chauffeur to doctor year. Senior riders call to make appointments, shopping and a companionable lunch. reservations, and volunteer route captains organize the Little wonder the Rural “I don’t know how master schedule around the Transportation Program we’d ever get around riders’ appointments and has been one of the if we didn’t have it.“ desired stops. most relied-upon programs of Marinette County Elderly Services. In 2002, funding from WPS Resources Foundation The bus also provides access to the Marinette helped continue this important rural outreach service through County Elderly Services sites where seniors can be served the purchase of two new specially equipped buses, each with nutritious meals; get help with questions and problems wheelchair and handicap-accessible seating and phones. regarding Medicare, insurance or social security; find support groups; or gain assistance with a range of senior issues. “ “I was 86 in February, and I’ve been a captain for the To riders and volunteers like Pearl Hirte, the bus is more than bus service close to 27 years. I offered to quit a couple just a convenience, it’s a connection to independence, and a times. I told the ladies, ‘Anybody who wants it can lifeline to good times spent with friends. take it.’ ‘No you’re doing fine,’ they say, ‘keep it.’ So I do it. first aid kit. I don’t know how we’d ever get around if “I get down the names of the people who want to ride we didn’t have it. There are a lot of people who don’t the bus, where they’re going, those that have medical have anybody. In the winter, if I had to drive, I wouldn’t problems or need to go to the doctor. The medical even go out. Many of us don’t drive. I depend on that people come first. Then we stop at the post office, van, too. We really appreciate it. the bank, the grocery store, the hospital, the doctor or ShopKo. We have the van’s phone number and call “We have a lot of fun, because people are all our own him when we’re done. age. We have people in their 90s, 80s, and 70s all riding the bus. We’re waiting for it to get here in the morning, “The van goes right to the farms and picks up people. but then we’re all glad to get home, kick off our shoes, sit We’re equipped with a wheelchair, a phone and a in the chair and go to sleep.” — PEARL HIRTE
  12. 12. ENVIRONMENT, EDUCATION & LIFELONG LEARNING “It’s those teachable moments that really have an impact!” MR. THEO WIEGEL 2nd Grade Teacher St. Paul’s School Wrightstown, WI 10 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  13. 13. THE EINSTEIN PROJECT THE EINSTEIN PROJECT OPERATES TO A SLIGHTLY in more than 220 schools, reaching more DIFFERENT THEORY OF RELATIVITY. Energy equals than 200,000 students. And the project students, educators and businesses connecting through ranks as one of the top six national models hands-on learning. for systemic change in Science Education. The nationally acclaimed non-profit organization works Funding from WPS Resources Foundation to improve the quality of education in science, math assists The Einstein Project in developing and technology for K-12 students throughout Wisconsin. curriculum and keeping units “I want to make a The Project provides science units for 36-some study areas affordable for school budgets. difference. That’s why ranging from Rocks and Minerals to Magnets and Motors. That support is critical for I got into teaching.” It provides educators with training on the units prior to teachers like Theodore Wiegel, teaching the Einstein materials in the classroom. And it whose passion for teaching is transformed into involves community businesses and scientists as mentors memorable learning experiences through The Einstein Project. and teaching resources. (Wisconsin Public Service employees, for example, teach electrical safety for the Einstein units “The children start out making observations, and they help on Electricity.) each other out. They measure and identify things ... they recognize patterns and cycles ... the whole process of The result is a chain reaction of learning. To date, Einstein change. They build on what they already know. And they Project units have been used by more than 2,200 teachers, learn from each other. Their reaction is incredible! “I’ve also enjoyed the training I’ve received through “ “Einstein units are like a mini-project that comes to you. Einstein. The teachers who have used the units actually You have everything that you need to teach your grade teach them to you. It’s educators teaching educators. level. It makes our science lessons more exciting. I love the process. “Right now, I’m using the Life Cycle of the Butterfly unit. “We share ideas and things that have worked or haven’t It is a living experience for me. The children prepare the worked. It makes the units even better. Einstein has been habitat, they squish the food into cups. They observe the really, really wonderful. larvae. I refer to them as ‘scientists.’ I’ll ask them a “As a child, I looked up to my teachers. I want to make question and say, ‘OK, scientists, do we agree with a difference. That’s why I got into teaching. I love our friends?’ helping children learn new things. Some days they just amaze me!”— THEO WIEGEL
  14. 14. FOX RIVER TRAIL FISHING PIER FROM EYESORE TO ECO-FRIENDLY PIER? That’s no fish story! Thanks to WPS Resources and a project team from Leadership Green Bay, an unsightly, abandoned sewer pipe has been transformed into a new fishing/observation deck along the popular Fox River Trail. The idea came from participants in the Leadership Green Bay program, a program of the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce that challenges prospective leaders to meet community needs. Working together with the Brown County Parks Department and the Metropolitan Sewerage District, the seven-member project team used grant monies from WPS Resources Foundation to purchase special recycled building materials. Then, with in-kind donations and their own volunteer time, they transformed the ugly, oversize pipe into a multi-use, “The pier is a beautiful handicap-accessible observation way to enhance the area.“ platform. The pier is now a popular gathering place along the trail, used for everything from fishing to quiet reflection along the Fox River. “ “Our team wanted to build something we could look back on and say, ‘That’s something we did ourselves, something people really enjoy.’ The pier is a beautiful way to enhance the area. People on the trail can stop and rest. People can fish. We bring our own families there. We got a lot of satisfaction from it.” — KAY KENT ” Wisconsin Public Service Employee and 2002 Leadership Green Bay Team Member 12 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  15. 15. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - ELECTRICITY MERIT BADGE CLINIC WHY DO FUSES BLOW? How do you read an electric meter? What do you do if a family member comes in contact with a live wire at home? For 50 years, Boy Scouts have found the answers to questions like these in information-packed clinics sponsored by WPS Resources. Since the program’s beginning, more than 2,700 boys quot;This is a great aged 11-18 have earned environment for boys their electricity merit to earn a badge that badges in the annual they might not otherwise one-day event. have gotten without It’s an intense learning the help of Wisconsin experience, bringing Public Service.” together Boy Scouts and Wisconsin Public Service line electricians, electrical engineers, safety specialists and other volunteers. The scouts demonstrate their home-built electric projects, learn about safety and discover the scientific and practical aspects of electricity. Wisconsin Public Service volunteers, Scouts and their parents agree: it’s a high–energy experience. done if they run into an emergency situation. The boys will be much more prepared. Who knows, they might save some lives. “ ”From my perspective, they did a super job covering “This is a great environment for boys to earn a badge that all the bases and making things understandable to they might not otherwise have gotten without the help 12–, 13– and 14–year–old boys. I was impressed with how of Wisconsin Public Service. It’s a real service to the much time and effort Wisconsin Public Service put into the ” Boy Scouts.” — MICHAEL VANDEN BUSCH presentations, including the safety aspects. It was a real Scoutmaster Troop 1236, eye–opener. The Scouts found out things like how to make Parent of a 7th Grade Boy Scout sure they don’t overload circuits at home or what should be W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N 13
  16. 16. FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS IN OUR COMMUNITIES 1776 American Dream Birch Trails Scout Council Wisconsin Inc. Action Waupaca Inc. Boy Scouts of America Adolescent Parenting Coalition Inc. Boys & Girls Club of Green Bay Agricultural Heritage & Resources Inc. Brown County Association of Retarded Citizens Inc. Alger On The Go, Inc. Calumet Theatre Company Alger Regional Community Foundation Inc. Camp Daniel, Inc. Altrusa International Foundation of Green Bay Cerebral Palsy Inc. Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Assoc. Christmas in April Inc. American Cancer Society Christmas in May, Sheboygan County American Heart Association Community Foundation for Delta County, Michigan Wisconsin Public Service has received a American Lung Association of Wisconsin Community Foundation of Portage County Inc. Regent’s Partnership Award from UW-Green Bay for the Mary Ann Cofrin Hall, the state’s first publicly constructed “green” building. American Red Cross Community Industries Foundation Association of Home & Community Education Crandon Area Chamber of Commerce (Manitowoc Co.) Downtown Green Bay Charitable Inc. Door County Economic Development Corp. Baraga County Community Foundation Dr. Kate Newcomb Convalescent Center Inc. Door County Memorial Hospital Bay Area Medical Center Foundation Inc. Dream Fund Outreach Bellin Foundation Ducks Unlimited – Northwoods Chapter Big Brothers / Big Sisters Ducks Unlimited Great Outdoors Festival Sponsored in part by WPS Resources, the Friends of Oshkosh Parks’ Celebration of Lights combines a dazzling tour of holiday lighting displays with a non-perishable food drive. 14 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  17. 17. Eastshore Humane Association Inc. Iron County Educational Horizon Foundation Junior Achievement Inc. The Einstein Project Inc Keweenaw Krayons WPS Energy Services went “wild” with a $1,000 donation for “Twilight at the Zoo,” Encompass Child Care Inc. an annual fundraising event for the Kiwanis Club of Sheboygan Charitable Foundation Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. Endowment Fund of the TB Scott Free Library Green Bay Area Chamber of Lake Superior Community Partnership Foundation Commerce Foundation Family Service Association Lakeland College Green Bay Botanical Garden Inc. Fox Theatre Corporation (WPS Garden of Lights) Lambeau Field Friends of Camp Batawagama Green Bay Marathon (WPS Kids’ Power Run) Literacy Council of Brown County, Green Bay, WI Friends of the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary Inc. Green Bay Symphony Orchestra Inc. Friends of the Oshkosh Seniors Center Inc. Habitat for Humanity Inc. Girl Scouts of America Lac-Baie Council Help of Door County Inc. Greater Green Bay Community Foundation Inc. Holy Family Memorial Inc. Greater Keweenaw Community Foundation Humane Society of Vilas County AGRICULTURAL SUPPORT & SPONSORSHIPS Breakfast on the Farm June Dairy Breakfast NWTC Farm Tour Breakfast on the Farm – Manitowoc Co. June Dairy Breakfast – Marathon Co. WI Agribusiness Foundation, Inc. Brown Co. 4-H Livestock Committee June Dairy Days in Portage Co. Wisconsin FFA Foundation, Inc. Da-Ran Dairy LLC Marathon Co. Agri-Business Council WVGA Door Co. Holstein Association Michigan State University
  18. 18. NEW Community Shelter Inc. Sheboygan Falls Main Street Inc. NEW Curative Rehabilitation Inc. St. Mary’s Hospital Foundation, Inc. New Hope Center Inc. St. Nicholas Hospital Northeastern Wisconsin Arts Council Inc. Third Avenue Playhouse Northern Health Centers Inc. Tomahawk Child Care Inc. The Experimental Aircraft Association received a Hi-Ranger truck from Wisconsin Public Service to use for signage installation, maintenance Omega House Tomahawk Regional Chamber of Commerce and photography. Ontonagon Theatre of the Performing Arts Inc. Town of Plum Lake Little Brothers – Friends of the Elderly Oshkosh Area Community Foundation Trees for Tomorrow Inc. Lupus Foundation of America Paine Art Center and Gardens Inc. Two Rivers Main Street Make-A-Wish Foundation of Wisconsin Inc. Pamiro Opera Company Inc. Two Rivers Skate Park Manitowoc Community Playground Project Paul’s Pantry For the second year in a row, WPS Resources cosponsored Manitowoc County’s Rebuilding Together, Manitowoc-Two Rivers Area Chamber Foundation Performing Arts Foundation Inc. where volunteers help fix up the home of an elderly or disabled person who is not able to do or afford some repair work that is needed. Marinette County Elderly Services Pine Mountain Music Festival Inc. Marquette Community Foundation Portage County Youth on Ice Inc. Michigan Economic Development Foundation Rawhide Inc. Mid-County Rescue Squad Inc. Rebuilding Together Manitowoc County Inc. Muscular Dystrophy Association Resch Center National Railroad Museum Rhinelander Competitive Soccer Club Inc. Neighborhood Housing Services of Green Bay Inc. The Salvation Army
  19. 19. University of Wisconsin – Green Bay WPS Resources Scholarships University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh The WMC Foundation Inc. – Business World Upper Peninsula Community Foundation YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Assoc.) Urban Hope Green Bay A Peregrine falcon nest at the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant plays home to four US Coast Guard Auxiliary Marinette-Menominee endangered chicks. Utility Business Education Coalition Marquette County United Fund & United Way Village of Crivitz Northwoods Copper Country (MI) Village of Sister Bay Oshkosh Delta County (MI) Violence Intervention Project Inc. Stevens Point Door County Volunteer Center of Brown County YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) Green Bay (Brown County) (WPS Golden Rule Awards) Green Bay / De Pere Langlade County Wa Wui Inc. Manitowoc Wausau Area Community Foundation Inc. Child Exploration Days offer children of Wisconsin Public Service employees a range of fun activities like cultural dance. Marquette County (MI) Wausau Kayak/Canoe Corporation Merrill Area White Pine Community Broadcasting Inc. Northwoods William Bonifas Fine Arts Center Inc. Portage County Wisconsin Council on Economic Education Inc. Sheboygan Wisconsin Foundation of Independent Wausau (Marathon County) Colleges Inc. University of Wisconsin Foundation Wisconsin Public Broadcasting Foundation
  20. 20. WPS RESOURCES CORPORATION POWERFUL SERVICE, EVERYWHERE YOU LOOK BASED IN GREEN BAY, WISCONSIN, WPS Resources Upper Peninsula Power Company is a regulated subsidiary Corporation is a holding company whose diversified providing electricity to 51,207 customers in the primarily system companies serve regulated and nonregulated rural countryside of Upper Michigan. The company serves energy markets across North America. 99 communities located over a 4,500-square-mile area. It is headquartered in Houghton, Michigan. Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, a regulated electric and natural gas utility, is the principal subsidiary of WPS WPS Power Development, Inc. and WPS Energy Resources. Based in Green Bay, Wisconsin, the company Services, Inc., are both nonregulated operations. serves 407,768 electric customers and 295,816 natural gas WPS Energy Services is a diversified energy supply customers throughout Northeast and Central Wisconsin and services company providing individualized strategies and an adjacent portion of Upper Michigan. More than that allow customers to manage energy needs and 2,400 Public Service employees provide products and capitalize on opportunities resulting from deregulation. services through a network of local offices. It maintains principal operations in Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Ontario and Quebec. WPS Power Development develops, owns and operates electric generation facilities and provides services to the electric power industry. The company operates facilities throughout the U.S. and in Canada, with the greatest concentration in the Northeast. Wisconsin Public Service Corporation Upper Peninsula Power Company WPS Energy Services, Inc. WPS Power Development, Inc. Both WPS Energy Services, Inc. and WPS Power Development, Inc. 18 W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N
  21. 21. 2002 BENEFICIARIES OF WPS RESOURCES FOUNDATION Education $252,700 10% (Scholarships $167,900) 26% Health & Human Services $331,045 31% Civic & Community $303,010 33% Culture & Art $99,225 TOTAL $985,980 2001-2002 WPS RESOURCES FOUNDATION MATCHING GIFTS PROGRAMS 104 employees participated of which 95 were eligible. $113,539.00 EMPLOYEE & RETIREE GIFTS $56,769.50 FOUNDATION MATCHING GIFTS $170,308.50 TOTAL GIFTS DOLLARS FOR DOERS Dollars for Doers is a WPS Resources program that was started in July 2001 to encourage community service. When employees or retirees contribute at least 20 hours of volunteer time, WPS Resources Foundation donates up to $100 to the nonprofit organization of their choice. The program focuses on organizations assisting with arts and culture, community and civic affairs, health and human services, and the environment in our service territory. $9,200.00 FROM WPS RESOURCES FOUNDATION W P S R E S O U R C E S C O R P O R AT I O N 19
  22. 22. A significant grant from WPS Energy Services will make a splash through improvements to Memorial Park, a popular park with pools, picnic areas and sports facilities in Euclid, Ohio. WPS Resources is an ongoing sponsor of the Resch Center, a premier entertainment venue in Green Bay. WPS Resources Corporation 700 North Adams Street Green Bay, WI 54301 www.wpsr.com 920-433-4901 © WPS Resources Corporation

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