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SSH & the City. A network approach for tracing the societal contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for local development

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Presented at the STI Conference held in Valencia on September 16, 2016.

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SSH & the City. A network approach for tracing the societal contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for local development

  1. 1. STI Conference 2016| Valencia September 14-16, 2016 SSH & the City. A network approach for tracing the societal contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for local development Nicolas Robinson-Garcia, Thed N. van Leeuwen & Ismael Ràfols
  2. 2. Index Rationale Alternative frameworks Towards a network approach Some results Discussion
  3. 3. EVALUATION SCHEMES address… Rationale 1. Natural & Exact Sciences 2. Global Communities Internationalization 3. Scientific Impact
  4. 4. EVALUATION SCHEMES neglect… Rationale 1. Social Sciences & Humanities 2. Local Communities 3. Societal Impact Only socioeconomic and with limitations
  5. 5. The attribution problem Researcher Paper Citation Progress SCIENTIFIC IMPACT
  6. 6. The attribution problem Researcher Paper? Project? ???? Progress SOCIETAL IMPACT
  7. 7. From impact to process indicators “The introduction of knowledge about the process into assessment procedures will also help us to understand how (potential) social impact is being achieved.” Spaapen & Drooge, 2011
  8. 8. From impact to process indicators RESEARCH QUESTION Can we identify these processes? HYPOTHESIS Social media as a way tracing interactions between researchers and non-academics
  9. 9. From Impact to Process Third Stream Metrics Productive interactions Knowledge Value Alliances Theoreticalframeworks
  10. 10. Third Stream Metrics Molas-Gallart et al., 2002 University Activities Contract research Collaboration networks Capabilities Patents Spin-offs
  11. 11. Productive interactions SCIENCE SOCIETY Productive interactions Spaapen & Drooge, 2011
  12. 12. Productive interactions Spaapen & Drooge, 2011 Direct interactions personal – email Indirect interactions texts – artifacts Financial interactions contracts - funding
  13. 13. Knowledge Value Alliances COLLECTIVE A COLLECTIVE B COLLECTIVE C Knowledge Value Alliances Rogers & Bozeman, 2001
  14. 14. Towards a network approach Capabilities and activities = Nodes and flows
  15. 15. Towards a network approach 1. Mutuals network of academic A 2. Levels of outreach A B C 3. Characterised mutuals local network LEGEND A Global research network B Local/global profesional network C Local network Node colours represent organisation to which a tweep belongs.
  16. 16. Twitter and other social media Web-links Contracts, spin-off, patents Publications in Google Scholar Publications in Scopus/WoS MorelocalMoreglobal ScientificimpactSocietalimpact Social media and informal interactions
  17. 17. Web-link analysis FAIL!
  18. 18. Social media and informal interactions The value of Twitter  Community building capacity  Combination between private and professional interests  Escaping from the ‘publication-focused’ approach Non-academics do not necessarily read papers
  19. 19. Some results Edwin Horlings’ social community in Twitter
  20. 20. Some results Edwin Horlings’ social community in Twitter Geographical proximity LOCAL GLOBAL
  21. 21. Some results Ludo Waltman’s social community in Twitter
  22. 22. Some results Geographical proximity LOCAL GLOBAL Ludo Waltman’s social community in Twitter
  23. 23. Measuring vs. mapping  Turning from ‘evaluative’ assessment to ‘strategic’ assessment Usefulness as a policy tool?  Mapping as a first step/complement to qualitative approaches Indicators vs. Visualisations  Societal impact is difficult to grasp, social engagement maybe a prior step towards it
  24. 24. Measuring vs. mapping  Where does social engagement takes place? • Finding the appropriate traces  There are many data restrictions and limitations using social media • Characterising users • Levels of aggregation
  25. 25. Further steps  Analysis of social communities of scientists using different data sources (LinkedIn, Google Scholar…)  Cross-validation of the network  Overlaying discourse ANY OTHER SUGGESTIONS ARE WELCOME!
  26. 26. STI Conference 2016| Valencia September 14-16, 2016 Thank you! Nicolas Robinson-Garcia, Thed N. van Leeuwen & Ismael Ràfols

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