Practical Workforce Development
Recruitment & Retention…..getting it right
John Sauer, University of Minnesota
Disability ...
Practical Workforce Development
Recruitment & Retention…..getting it right
John Sauer, Project Coordinator
Research and Tr...
Orientation
Welcoming New DSPs
Dyad Activity
Think back to when you first started at your
organization….think about your responses to
the questions…talk ...
The Purpose of Orientation
To help new workers feel confident and
comfortable about having made the correct
choice of empl...
Key Components of Good
Orientations
• Separate out skill building activities from orientation
activities.
• Help the perso...
• Use New Staff Survey (aka “30 day” or “New Hire”) to determine
How Well organization has been meeting the expectations o...
Mentoring: A definition
• Mentoring is defined as a method of teaching and
learning through a deliberate pairing of a more...
Peer Empowerment Program
• The Peer Empowerment Program
(PEP): A Complete Toolkit for
Planning and Implementing Mentoring
...
Triad Activity
What makes training excellent?
• Think of your FAVORITE or BEST training experience. List
specific things t...
Common Problems with Training
From employee perspective:
• Finding training offered when we need it
• Finding training tha...
Competency Based Training
ID Desired Outcomes
ID Needed Skills
(CSSS)
Measure Current Skills
Set Learning Expectations
ID ...
Competencies:
• Community Support Skill Standards (CSSS) Identifies
master level practice standards for DSPs in progressiv...
College of Direct Support
The Australia CDS web site:
http//:www.collegeofdirectsupport.com/australia
USA Data:
114,000 DS...
Apprenticeship in Community Human Services
• Currently, there is a national DSP classification of
apprenticeship within th...
National DSP
Credential Program
– Launched July 2006
– Is industry driven and VOLUNTARY
– Establishes national patterns fo...
NADSP DSP Credentialing
Program Guidebook
• Reviews what credentialing is and why it is important
• Overview of the NADSP ...
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Orientation - Presentation 3 John Sauer MSW and M Ed Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota USA November 2008

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Recruitment & Retention…..getting it right

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  • Emphasize that orientation is NOT training and we do a lot of skill and technical training in what we often call orientation. Refer to their descriptions of how they do orientation and point out that a lot of technical training occurs in that tie period.
  • Orientation practices can have a significant effect on early turnover Poor or absent orientation practices can leave employees feeling overwhelmed and underappreciated The hardest things for anyone starting a new job include: Getting to know the people they support & other staff members Learning the routines and completing duties Finding out that not everyone gets along with one another Adjusting to the schedule Learning and remembering everything
  • Some additional areas to consider are: Describe and assist employees in understanding and performing critical job skills and duties . Provide realistic information regarding stresses and provide methods for understanding and handling stress. Help people connect with others who are part of their jobs. (personnel, coworkers, consumers, families, executives, etc.)
  • The 30 day or new hire survey can be found in all three RTC resources: the Book, the RRD curriculum, and the CFSM courses We will now talk about Mentoring as an orientation strategy.
  • The Peer Empowerment Program (PEP): A Complete Toolkit for Planning and Implementing Mentoring Programs Within Community-Based Human Services Organizations By M. Taylor, J. Sauer, A. Hewitt, S. O'Nell, and S. Larson A planning guide and curriculum for supervisors and agency staff focusing on socialization and skill development for all employees. (2001) • Cost: $37.00 for a package which includes Program Coordinator Guide, Facilitator Guide, and Learner Guide. Learner Guides may be photocopied.
  • After group discussion, refer to handout of “good training”
  • Employee Perspective Finding training offered when they need it : In order to retain information, employees must use it as soon as possible after learning it. Training schedules that are not based on employee needs can result in employees working without important training, or losing skills that are not used shortly after training. Finding training that meets their scheduling needs : Today, employees juggle more responsibilities than ever, often with less resources. The more flexible training is, the more likely the employee will be motivated to participate in it. Finding training that adds value to their work or lives : There needs to be a strong connection between employees’ perception of their needs and the training that is offered. Otherwise, employee “cooperation” with training will not be high. Finding training in a format that works for them: Every person learns differently. Training needs to meet an employee’s needs and their learning style, not the instructor’s. Trainer/Administrator Perspective Ensuring compliance with mandates and requirements : While many industries have to deal with mandates regarding occupational safety and fair labor practices, the human services field often have additional training mandates. Coordination of training events : This includes scheduling of rooms, resources, trainers, and employees, gathering and organizing materials, and marketing the training events. Finding high quality training resources and events : Many times trainers and FLSs find it challenging to identify effective, high quality training events, trainers, or materials that are available when needed.
  • Identifying what outcomes you want for persons with disabilities so you have a foundation on which to base your values, mission, and policies and practices. Identifying which skills an employee needs to develop to meet the desired outcomes and to perform the direct support professional job most effectively Measuring current knowledge, skills and attitudes of DSPs so you know where the learning gaps are to target for training. Ensuring that specific skills have been mastered by the employee usually during or after orientation of training events Demonstrating that the employee has important skills and knowledge to perform their job competently Assessment of employee competence is a critical part of designing, implementing, and revising training. Competencies are skills and behaviors…. Things you can do and show: Knowledge Skills Abilities Attitudes Acquired through work experience, life experience, study or training
  • There are at least three current job analyses that have already been done in the area of community based human services work. These job analyses provide specific skill statements and important competencies for various positions in human services.:
  • Apprenticeships are typically full time b/c there is a 2000 hour work requirement that must be met in order to obtain apprenticeship. Apprenticeship programs require an escalating wage, so an increase in pay must be awarded upon completion. For employers, benefits include: Skilled workers trained to industry/employer specifications to produce quality results Reduced turnover For employees, benefits include: Portable credentials recognized nationally and often globally Opportunity for college credit and future degrees.
  • Three levels within the national credentialing program DSP –Registered DSP - Certified Training and work sample requirements DSP - Specialized Training and work sample requirements Four Specialized Certificates Positive Behavior Support Health Support Inclusion Supervision and Mentoring
  • Orientation - Presentation 3 John Sauer MSW and M Ed Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota USA November 2008

    1. 1. Practical Workforce Development Recruitment & Retention…..getting it right John Sauer, University of Minnesota Disability In-Service Training Support Service Inc.
    2. 2. Practical Workforce Development Recruitment & Retention…..getting it right John Sauer, Project Coordinator Research and Training Center, University of Minnesota sauer006@umn.edu November 6, 2008
    3. 3. Orientation Welcoming New DSPs
    4. 4. Dyad Activity Think back to when you first started at your organization….think about your responses to the questions…talk with a partner • What was your orientation like? What did you like? What didn’t you like? Why? • What do you do for orientation in your organization?
    5. 5. The Purpose of Orientation To help new workers feel confident and comfortable about having made the correct choice of employment and to help them begin to develop a positive connection to the organization and the specific position.
    6. 6. Key Components of Good Orientations • Separate out skill building activities from orientation activities. • Help the person feel comfortable in the environment. (What are the “rules?” Where is the phone? etc.) • Keep the focus on welcoming the new employee and helping the employee fit in and feel comfortable. • Provide information about the agency’s mission, vision, philosophies and values.
    7. 7. • Use New Staff Survey (aka “30 day” or “New Hire”) to determine How Well organization has been meeting the expectations of the new employee and how satisfied the employee is with the new job. • Create a set of “WELCOME” gifts and activities to help new worker feel More Comfortable and Less Stressful, and to Socialize the employee into Your Culture. • Develop a Job Shadowing Program for New Employee for One or Two weeks (or longer if needed) • Design and Develop a Mentoring Program to help New DSP/FLS connect better to Job Expectations, Work Site Informal and Formal Practices and Organization Culture ORIENTATION STRATEGIES
    8. 8. Mentoring: A definition • Mentoring is defined as a method of teaching and learning through a deliberate pairing of a more skilled or experienced person with a lesser-skilled or experienced one. • The goal of this partnership is to help the mentee feel supported, welcome and to support their growth and development in specific competencies. Taylor, Sauer et al: PEP Curriculum (2001)
    9. 9. Peer Empowerment Program • The Peer Empowerment Program (PEP): A Complete Toolkit for Planning and Implementing Mentoring Programs Within Community-Based Human Services Organizations • A planning guide and curriculum for supervisors and agency staff focusing on socialization and skill development for all employees. • Program Coordinator Guide, Facilitator Guide and Learner Guide (http://rtc.umn.edu/wddsp/dol.html)
    10. 10. Triad Activity What makes training excellent? • Think of your FAVORITE or BEST training experience. List specific things that made it work for you. • Think of other, LESS POSITIVE, experiences. List things that made them negative or frustrating for you. • Volunteers share 1 or 2 ideas
    11. 11. Common Problems with Training From employee perspective: • Finding training offered when we need it • Finding training that meets our scheduling needs • Finding training that adds value to our work and lives • Finding training in a format that works for us From trainer/administrator perspective: • Ensuring compliance with mandates and requirements • Effectively coordinating and scheduling training events • Finding high quality training resources and opportunities What are some other issues?
    12. 12. Competency Based Training ID Desired Outcomes ID Needed Skills (CSSS) Measure Current Skills Set Learning Expectations ID Training Strategy and Provide Training Transfer skills to job Evaluate Performance
    13. 13. Competencies: • Community Support Skill Standards (CSSS) Identifies master level practice standards for DSPs in progressive, community-based human service work environments, with a cross-consumer focus (i.e. not specific to one type of disability or human service need). Find this at www.hsri.org • Community Residential Core Competencies (CRCC) CRCC job analysis describes the necessary base competencies required for DSPs working in community residential services for people with developmental disabilities. Find it at http://rtc.umn.edu/dsp • Minnesota Frontline Supervisor Competencies and Performance Indicators (MNFLSCPI) The MNFLSCPI competencies are required of frontline supervisors providing community support services to people with developmental disabilities in both residential and vocational settings. Find it at: http://rtc.umn.edu/dsp
    14. 14. College of Direct Support The Australia CDS web site: http//:www.collegeofdirectsupport.com/australia USA Data: 114,000 DSP learners each day 30 states 1,040,000+ hours completed
    15. 15. Apprenticeship in Community Human Services • Currently, there is a national DSP classification of apprenticeship within the Department of Labor—Direct Support Specialist • Some 37,000 program sponsors, representing over a quarter million employers, industries and companies, offer registered apprenticeship training. (www.dol.gov) • Apprenticeships typically coexist with full time employment. • Apprenticeship programs require an escalating wage • Check out (www.dol.gov) for additional information
    16. 16. National DSP Credential Program – Launched July 2006 – Is industry driven and VOLUNTARY – Establishes national patterns for work-based learning and related instruction – Is based on nationally validated competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) called the Community Support Skill Standards, the NADSP Code of Ethics and DSP Professionalism – Is affordable, flexible, portable, and nationally recognized – Verification process to confirm DSP certification status – 3 Levels- DSP-R, DSP-C, DSP-S – About 130 DSP-Rs have been achieved
    17. 17. NADSP DSP Credentialing Program Guidebook • Reviews what credentialing is and why it is important • Overview of the NADSP Credentialing Program – Descriptions of the three tiers – Requirements of the program and its components – Application process and how to use the required forms – Grievance process – Accreditation of educational programs process overview • Portfolio development overview – Instructions for how to complete a portfolio – Portfolio review process • Using mentors – Role of mentors – Importance of using a mentor

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