Regional Workshop on ProjectImplementation in West and Central       Africa: Final report              January 2011
EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe Regional Workshop on Project Implementation in West and Central Africa,organized by the International...
CONTEXTIFAD’s country programmes constitute the main vehicle for improving the lives of the ruralpoor and learning lessons...
Ms Ndeye Coumba Fall, Executive Director of WARF, outlined the workshopprocedures. Recalling the objectives set, she prese...
Insights emerging from the panel discussions indicate that innovation canimprove product quality to meet end user demand, ...
An analysis of experience with previous agricultural development projects (large-scale planning and development, community...
What is the future of IFAD grants?      Why are none of the Central Africa projects among the six best projects in      th...
Show flexibility by making adjustments as needed throughout the       scaling up process, taking into account specificitie...
experiences and project innovations by          providing   technical support    andorganizing workshops and knowledge fai...
Accordingly, participants recommended that IFAD projects and programmes payparticular attention to selecting subsectors an...
ANNEXES         Annexe 1: Chronogramme      JOUR 1: LUNDI, 8 NOVEMBRE 2010  HEURE            ACTIVITES              METHOD...
10.15-       Présentation de            Exposé liminaire suivi    Ndèye Coumba Fall                      Thiendou Niang   ...
Choisir votre groupe: fiches disponibles à l’inscription14.30-      Entreprenariat Rural   Discussions des       Promer II...
parallèles8.30-10.00     Préparation des         Discussion sur les      Modérateurs et        Modérateur de groupe       ...
Choisir votre groupe lors de votre inscription (fiches disponibles à l’inscription)14.00-16.00     Suivi & Evaluation     ...
20:00          Soirée Culturelle et dîner offerts par les Projets du Sénégal    JOUR 3: MERCREDI, 10 NOVEMBRE 2010HEURE   ...
15.30 –      Restitution des rapports des   Partage des principaux         Perin Saint Ange               Thiendou Niang  ...
Annexe 2: Liste des participants                                                                       Prénoms/First    FO...
14   BENIN     PRONAF/IITA          GBAGUIDI         BRICE              Chercheur15   BENIN     PRONAF/IITA          ALLOM...
BURKINA     Cabinet du Ministre de   TRAORE           Mahamadou           Conseiller technique     FASO       lAgriculture...
GABON   Ministère de l’Agriculture Mme. MBENG        Yolande        Directrice Nationale des50                            ...
GHANA     RAFIP                   MENSAH           RAYMOND           M&E SPECIALIST66     GHANA     REP                   ...
GUINEE    Fédération des          Mme.CAMARA   Foulématou          Présidente     CONAKRY   Organisations Paysannes83     ...
99    ITALY   FIDA   Dadush          Sarah            Juriste100   ITALY   FIDA   URCINOLI        Maria Carolina   Program...
ITALY       FIDA                     SOURANG        Cheikh           Senior Programm120                                   ...
MAURITANI   PDDO                     OULD ABDELLAHI         MOHAMED            RESPONSIBLE136   E                         ...
NIGERIA      Country Office Abuja      WILLS OBONG    Patricia           Programm Assistant149      NIGERIA      IFAD     ...
Republique   PRODER SUD               BABINGUI       Evariste Aurelten   RPSE161   du CONGO      Republique   PRODER SUD  ...
RDC        PRAPO                     BULUBULU        Jean Damas         Coordonnateur172      RDC        PRAPO            ...
SENEGAL   PRODAM                BA            THIERNO         DIRECTEUR183      SENEGAL   PRODAM                FAYE      ...
SENEGAL   PAFA        Mme.BA        Aissatou          SPICV / EG (Spécialiste                                             ...
SENEGAL   PROMER II           DIEBAKHATE    Hawa           Assistante207                                                  ...
SENEGAL   PROMER / Kolda   Gnamadio         Abdoulaye219      SENEGAL   DCEF MEF         NDIAYE DIOP      Maguette       C...
SENEGAL   FRAO                       FALL           Coumba        Directrice231      SENEGAL   FRAO                       ...
SENEGAL   ASPRODEB                SARR          Saliou243      SENEGAL                           DIOP          Aysatou Ndi...
SENEGAL   RTS/TV                    BARRY         Abdoulaye     Journaliste255      SENEGAL   CMC                       FA...
SIERRA   RCPRP/RFCIP                AMADU         FESTUS O.       MONITORING &267   LEONNE                                ...
Annexe 3: Liste des plans d’actions •   Plan d’action programme-pays RDC (PRAPE, PRAPO et PIRAM) •   Plan d’action 2011 Co...
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2010 Portofolio Review Final Report

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2010 Portofolio Review Final Report

  1. 1. Regional Workshop on ProjectImplementation in West and Central Africa: Final report January 2011
  2. 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe Regional Workshop on Project Implementation in West and Central Africa,organized by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) jointlywith the Government of Senegal with technical support from the West AfricaRural Foundation (WARF), was held in Dakar from 8 to 11 November 2010.The main objectives were: (1) to provide for ongoing improvements inperformance on project implementation; (2) to discuss promoting opportunitiesfor growth through the value chain approach; and (3) to review progress madeon achieving the objectives set under the Accra Agenda for Action, and prepare aplan of action for 2011 and supervision plans.The workshop brought together 276 participants including project staff andrepresentatives of Government, peasant organizations and NGO leadership, theprivate sector, cooperating institutions and IFAD staff.The opening ceremony was chaired by Mr Khadim Gueye, Minister of Agricultureof Senegal. Also present were Ms Bintou Djibo, United Nations ResidentCoordinator in Senegal, and Mr Mohamed Béavogui, Director of IFAD’s West andCentral Africa Division.The main learnings from the workshop relate to the importance of value chainsfor small-scale producers and their professional associations, and the need forprojects to improve their procedures and working tools.All participants recognized the relevance of the value chain approach, with supplydriven by consumer needs and cost optimization. The participants recommendedthat IFAD projects and programmes pay particular attention to selectingsubsectors and supporting producer organizations to ensure that they benefitfrom value chain opportunities.Participants underscored that making projects more effective calls for measuringresults with a sound monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system to justify IFAD’spresence. In addition, successful experiences should be scaled up to reach themaximum number of poor rural people and contribute directly to achieving theMillennium Development Goals (MDGs). In mobilizing resources for scaling up, itis crucial to provide implementation support, budget realistically to keep up thepace of work programme execution, and ensure rapid and procedurally sounddisbursement. Decentralizing portfolio management (hub and offices) shouldfacilitate and accelerate disbursements through proximity management.Finally, participants recommended that annual work programmes and budgets(AWPBs) be standardized pursuant to IFAD directives on project implementation,supervision and monitoring. As part of this effort, all project staff should beevaluated using the performance evaluation system at the end of each year.Also, peer review within clusters should be strengthened by having portfoliomanagers more involved in design, implementation, supervision and knowledgemanagement, in addition to organizing periodic reviews and innovations with aview to scaling up. 2
  3. 3. CONTEXTIFAD’s country programmes constitute the main vehicle for improving the lives of the ruralpoor and learning lessons about what works and what does not work in fighting poverty.Effective project implementation lies at the heart of the West and Central AfricaDivision’s management plan and efforts to achieve a real and sustainable impactin the region.Within this context, the Division organized – together with the Minister ofAgriculture for the Republic of Senegal and with support from the West AfricaRural Foundation (WARF) – the Fifth Regional Workshop on ProjectImplementation, which was held in Dakar from 8 to 11 November 2010.The main objectives were as follows: (1) to provide for ongoing improvements inperformance on project implementation; (2) to discuss promoting opportunitiesfor growth through the value chain approach; and (3) to review progress madeon achieving the objectives set under the Accra Agenda for Action, and prepare aplan of action for 2011 and supervision plans.The workshop brought together 276 participants, including project staff andrepresentatives of Government, peasant organizations and NGO leadership, theprivate sector, cooperating institutions and IFAD staff.The main theme was the role of IFAD-funded projects within the value chainapproach in creating opportunities and growth. WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS OpeningMr Thierno Ba, Director of the Matam Agricultural Development Project (PRODAMSenegal) management unit, welcomed the participants and commended thechoice of theme by the projects following the July 2010 survey.Ms Bintou Djibo, United Nations Resident Coordinator in Senegal and ResidentRepresentative of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), statedthat the results achieved by IFAD’s projects were satisfactory and warrantedscaling up in response to the Government’s plans to achieve food self-sufficiency.Mr Mohamed Béavogui, Director of IFAD’s West and Central Africa Division,underscored the main lesson learned from implementing IFAD projects in Westand Central Africa: rural populations are able to reverse negative trends in foodinsecurity, underemployment and rural exodus among young people – anddevelop sustainable economic alternatives – when favourable conditions are putin place.Finally, Mr Khadim Gueye, Minister of Agriculture of Senegal, praised IFAD-Senegal cooperation, which had made great strides since the early 1990s.Current financial commitments on projects approved stood at more than US$235million (approximately CFAF 150 billion), including US$148.5 million in loans. 3
  4. 4. Ms Ndeye Coumba Fall, Executive Director of WARF, outlined the workshopprocedures. Recalling the objectives set, she presented the methodology,comprising introductory presentations, panels, working groups, plenary sessionsand field visits to see the value chain in action. She underscored the participatorynature of the workshop and the prominent role assigned to projects inintroducing and moderating sessions and sharing experiences.Policy, strategy and constraintsTo facilitate a full grasp of policy and strategy in West and Central Africa andIFAD’s new policy on decentralization, Mr Béavogui provided an overview ofIFAD’s strategies, policies and procedures. He mentioned the region’s highpotential for growth with improved political stability, an extensive urban market,less dependency on food imports, the increase in product processing andrenewed support for agriculture by development partners. Continuing challengesfaced by the region include underused irrigation potential, transaction costs andbureaucracy.Mr Béavogui highlighted IFAD’s evolving role in West Africa with the shift fromstrengthening collective action in poor rural areas through community-drivendevelopment, to supporting small-scale operators and rural poor people inovercoming poverty sustainably by becoming providers of competitive goods andservices within the value chain.The shift is reflected in IFAD’s work, which focuses on strengthening producers’organizations, financial services, and access to seed, fertilizer and infrastructurein support of the value chain for staple and export crops and biofuels. Thistranslates into stronger support for grass-roots community organizations toensure that poor and vulnerable people take part in economic exchanges. IFADalso promotes innovation and scaling up in the areas of natural resourcemanagement, climate change adaptation, improved livestock management,micro-irrigation and local renewable energy.Within this context, IFAD’s decentralization underpins sector policy andstrengthens the regional team in preparing COSOPs, processing loans andgrants, and supervising and supporting project implementation. Mr Béavoguinoted that the immediate challenges facing IFAD and its projects are to mobilizefinancing and cofinancing quickly, and to increase the disbursement rate whileensuring compliance with the principles of integrity, quality and results-basedoperations.Lastly, he noted that IFAD’s Vision 2020 calls for locating IFAD staff in allcountries in the region. Decentralized regional support will provide platforms andbroader financing options to improve collaboration with the public and privatesectors, favour relations with producers’ organizations, governments andexternal investors, and give priority to partners sensitive to the issues of small-scale operators, gender, young people and the environment.Integrating value chains into projects and programmesThe participants then exchanged experiences on the value chain approach andidentified challenges, as well as successes and how to build them into theimplementation of their own programmes. 4
  5. 5. Insights emerging from the panel discussions indicate that innovation canimprove product quality to meet end user demand, and that good governancecan lower transaction costs and create an enabling environment for public-private partnerships. The exchanges also highlighted the fact that under thevalue chain approach, buyers take into consideration factors other than price,such as product quality, packaging and delivery times. Capacity-building wasrecommended for value chain actors to improve negotiating skills among ruralproducers and lead to win-win situations for buyers and sellers.The working groups organized their discussions around: (a) how value chains canconsolidate entrepreneurship; (b) how value chains can help professionalizeorganizations; (c) ways and means of financing the value chain; (d) factorsaffecting governance within the value chain.The session on rural entrepreneurship underscored the importance ofintegrating the value chain approach into national and regional agriculturalpolicies, creating a framework for policy dialogue in which stakeholders canexchange views on how to operationalize the value chain approach, meet marketstandards for agricultural produce and set up rural venture funds.The professional organizations session highlighted the need for professionalproducer organizations, capacity-building for peasant organizations and Staterecognition of farming as an occupation. The session also underscoredcontractualization as a critical factor in professionalizing, the need for producerorganizations to comply with rules and procedures and, finally, the need topromote professional organizations of women and young people specializing inprocessing and marketing.The session on ways and means of financing noted the limited range offinancial products and services available for agro-industry, low profit margins insome agricultural enterprises, the enormous need for infrastructure financing inexcess of microfinance institutions’ capacity, and the complexities of the lendingsystem.The good governance session recommended regional projects to promotespecific products with vigorous action plans, with information systems onmarkets in their intervention areas disseminating information by telephone,television and radio. Another recommendation called for governments to take arole as regulators rather than actors.Project implementation and performanceThe panel on the lessons and challenges of project implementation in West andCentral Africa pointed up the limited capacity of project staff, poor communityparticipation in project implementation and low disbursement rates (e.g. inLiberia). In Nigeria, the assumption that government counterpart funding wouldbe available proved incorrect. Moreover, complex institutional arrangements andmultiple implementation agencies have generated 13 monitoring activities peryear per agency, and the lack of counterpart funding is slowing disbursements.The project in Sao Tomé and Principe shows that the main obstacles to executingAWPBs are delays caused by restrictive public procurement procedures (with fewsuppliers and high transport costs for foreign suppliers), as well as the “braindrain”, particularly among young professionals, and poor operator capacity. 5
  6. 6. An analysis of experience with previous agricultural development projects (large-scale planning and development, community projects) has shown that despitesubstantial financial resources provided, problems have continued to arise interms of ownership and ensuring the profitability and sustainability ofachievements, particularly in the post-project phase.In Guinea, professional organizations, NGOs and permanent agricultural researchand advisory agencies should act as guarantors of the sustainability of actionsand impact. The State should make more of an effort to pay its projectcontribution and external debt in a timely manner so as not to expose projects tothe risk of suspension or closure, which would impede activities at every point inthe value chain.In Congo, the PRODER-Sud Rural Development Project shows that certain projectareas can be accessed only by air, that insufficient time for supervision missionsrules out participation by government organizations and that high turnover inproject teams jeopardizes their chance of success.Overall, the major lessons highlighted by the panel are that raising awarenessamong project beneficiaries ensures higher levels of participation and thatownership and steering project implementation build confidence. Directsupervision by IFAD improves project performance, but technical issues, andproject management and execution, should be built into direct supervisionarrangements.Annual portfolio review 2010In the introductory presentation, Perin Saint Ange indicated that IFAD’s portfolioincludes 50 active projects in 21 countries in West and Central Africa for totalIFAD financing of US$800 million. Thirteen partners provide 33 per centadditional financing for 33 projects in the amount of US$385 million. The regionalgrants portfolio is valued at US$23 million. There are 15 large regional grantstotaling US$20 million and 20 small grants for US$3 million.The Division’s main activities in support of implementation were severalsupervision/implementation support missions, disbursement of more thanUS$340 million (43 per cent of amounts allocated) and processing of 540withdrawal applications. In addition, management of 31 of the 51 projects israted moderately satisfactory or satisfactory. Challenges relate to monitoringcontinuing low disbursement rates, delays in filing audit and certification reports,and a few instances of poor project management. Steps to improve projectperformance include minimizing risk in countries with difficult contexts, buildingcapacity by training IFAD and project staff, restructuring and closing projects,and developing partnerships with local and bilateral institutions having provenexpertise in countries with difficult contexts.The presentation posed the following questions: What is IFAD doing to address the low disbursement rate? What are the criteria for rating performance? What is the M&E situation of IFAD’s projects at the country level, compared to individual project evaluations reported? 6
  7. 7. What is the future of IFAD grants? Why are none of the Central Africa projects among the six best projects in the West and Central Africa portfolio? What is the meaning of “risk” for certain projects?In a parallel session, participants examined the question of projectimplementation and performance from the point of view of M&E, withdrawalapplications and procurement procedures, IFAD’s decentralization, capitalizationand scaling up.In the area of M&E, participants noted that practices varied by project, despitethe existence of systems such as the results and impact measurement system(RIMS), and recommended that the West and Central Africa Division ensure aminimum of shared M&E practices among projects, particularly with respect toRIMS reporting at all three levels.Participants recommended that M&E teams be set up and M&E proceduresmanuals prepared (identifying actors and detailing procedures) for adoption byall those involved, on a participatory basis, prior to start-up. They alsounderscored the importance of systematizing RIMS benchmark surveys in atimely manner and conducting baseline surveys to meet information needs, andof capitalizing on available studies. Moreover, they noted the need to improveRIMS impact measurement (third-level indicators). They commended the projectM&E support programme (carried out by WARF) for linking M&E with AWPBmonitoring.Concerning withdrawal applications and procurement procedures, participantsrecalled the importance of the letter to the borrower and the loan agreement,and the need to prepare a procurement plan based on a realistic AWPB, and toensure approval once only by statement of no objection and require another onlyin the event of changes to initial planning. They deemed it essential to make useof consultants in procurement if project staff do not include a procurementspecialist (for planning, preparation of tender documents and technicalspecifications). Finally, they commended IFAD for encouraging the use ofcomputer applications to ensure traceability, full and accurate documentationand effective internal control.On the subject of decentralization, participants welcomed the principle of settingup four regional hubs and six country offices to strengthen financial autonomybased on local capacity, proximity portfolio management (to expedite statementsof no objection and withdrawal applications by processing them locally) andshare administrative services and equipment.Regarding capitalization and scaling up, participants underscored the need to: Ensure that results (outcomes and impact) are measured by the M&E system in order to identify and characterize results to scale up; Prepare methodological guidelines based on successful experiences, instruments for sharing experiences and managing knowledge on scaling up, and include a scaling up strategy in project preparation and planning to replicate successes: what are the prerequisites for scaling up? 7
  8. 8. Show flexibility by making adjustments as needed throughout the scaling up process, taking into account specificities of all kinds; Ensure that the political will, institutional capacity and financial resources are available for scaling up; Take into account socio-cultural features, gender considerations and the mainstreaming of young people in the scaling up process.Field visitsThe participants visited the Darou Ndoye and Djilakh village farms set up underthe REVA (Return to Agriculture) programme. The Darou Ndoye farm, with anarea of 20 hectares, mobilizes 40 producers belonging to two economic interestgroups with 20 members each. It is financed out of the national budget. TheDjilakh farm brings together 100 producers belonging to five economic interestgroups with 20 members each and is funded by Spanish cooperation and theState.Objectives pursued are to increase yields, promote year-round productionthrough irrigation and raise rural incomes to slow rural exodus.The Government’s work in this area includes installing irrigation systems topromote intensification and diversification, supplying infrastructure to buildproducer capacity and providing credit services.The main lesson learned from this visit was that the public-private partnershipmodel is workable, especially if the value chain approach is followed. Contractsbetween producers and exporters based on trust and transparency can lead toimprovements in producers’ incomes and living conditions. Still, the question ofsustainability remains: what happens when the State withdraws fromfinancing?Action plans and direct supervisionThe participants then evaluated 2010 action plans, set priorities for 2011 actionplans and reviewed experiences with direct supervision.The main challenges involved in country action plans relate to an imperfect graspof IFAD procedures on project management (preparation of withdrawalapplications and tender documents, internationalization of working documents,preparation of AWPBs, etc.), delays and shortfalls in mobilizing counterpartfunds, poor M&E performance, and poor capitalization and dissemination ofproject accomplishments. Added to this is the limited capacity of national serviceproviders to implement programmes within the required timelines.Moreover, participants raised the issue of project staff salaries – in particular, thelack of pay harmonization among project teams at country level (e.g. Senegaland Gambia) and the lack of pay competitiveness (Sao Tomé and Principe, Cap-Vert).To meet these challenges, participants recommended targeted training forproject teams (in financial management, procurement and M&E), on-sitesupport, adaptations of the letter to the borrower and strengthening of jointsupervision arrangements for all projects to promote exchanges and mutualsupport. They also recommended strengthening arrangements for capitalizing on 8
  9. 9. experiences and project innovations by providing technical support andorganizing workshops and knowledge fairs.Concerning direct supervision, participants mentioned advantages such as fewerdelays in obtaining statements of no objection, greater familiarity with projects,flexibility on the part of country portfolio managers through more frequent use ofcomputer applications, joint project supervision within a single country and theinclusion of technical and trust considerations in direct supervision.Areas for improvement included the preparation of supervision missions byproject and country teams, particularly in identifying special needs, defining clearterms of reference, and organizing joint donor and government missions.Workshop closingIn his closing remarks, Mr Mohamed Béavogui applauded the large number ofparticipants (nearly 300) and the close involvement by projects in workshoppreparations. He thanked the Government of Senegal for hosting the workshopand making possible its success. He also congratulated WARF on its technicalsupport in organizing the workshop. He continued with a detailed review of theconclusions and recommendations reached to improve IFAD projectimplementation, finally expressing the wish that the next workshop in 2011 beheld in a Central African country.In his closing remarks, Mr Ndiobo Diène, representing Senegal’s Ministry ofAgriculture, commended IFAD for having held the workshop in Senegal. He waspleased that the participants had drawn major lessons, in terms of making use ofthe value chain approach and the importance of public-private partnerships, fromtheir visits to the Djilakh and Darou Ndoye farms. Finally, he reaffirmed theGovernment’s commitment to draw inspiration from the workshop’s learnings inpromoting agriculture under a modern, diversified and high-performanceapproach.IV. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONSUpon completion of the work, Mr Thiendou Niang, facilitator, asked theparticipants to indicate the main learnings they had acquired at the workshop.These included the conclusions and recommendations outlined below.All participants recognized the relevance of the value chain approach as apowerful lever to boost rural entrepreneurialism. They underscored that valuechain analysis leads to a better understanding and appreciation of the variousactors in the chain and their role within the subsector. In addition, it is essentialthat supply be driven by consumer needs and cost optimization. Finally, thevalue chain approach enables small-scale producers to improve their incomes.However, bringing small-scale producers into promising value chains iscontingent upon recognizing that buyers have an interest in the value chain thatexceeds selling prices alone. A buyer’s needs are not limited to negotiating acompetitive unit price but include selecting a supplier capable of meeting exactstandards with a product that is appropriately packaged, produced in sufficientvolume and with the proper timing, and so on. The farmers’ representativeunderscored that the value chain approach offers opportunities for producers tostrengthen their organizations through better access to credit and markets. 9
  10. 10. Accordingly, participants recommended that IFAD projects and programmes payparticular attention to selecting subsectors and supporting producerorganizations to ensure that they benefit from value chain opportunities.Participants underscored that making projects more effective calls for measuringresults with a sound M&E system to justify IFAD’s presence. In addition,successful experiences should be scaled up to reach the maximum number ofpoor rural people and contribute directly to achieving the MDGs. In mobilizingresources for scaling up, it is crucial to provide implementation support, budgetrealistically to keep up the pace of work programme execution, and ensure rapidand procedurally sound disbursement. Decentralizing portfolio management (huband country offices) should facilitate and accelerate disbursements throughproximity management.Finally, participants recommended that AWPBs be standardized pursuant to IFADdirectives on project implementation, supervision and monitoring. As part of thiseffort, all project staff should be evaluated using the performance evaluationsystem at the end of each year. Also, peer review within clusters should bestrengthened by having portfolio managers more involved in design,implementation, supervision and knowledge management, in addition toorganizing periodic reviews and innovations with a view to scaling up. 10
  11. 11. ANNEXES Annexe 1: Chronogramme JOUR 1: LUNDI, 8 NOVEMBRE 2010 HEURE ACTIVITES METHODOLOGIE ANIMATEURS MODERATEURS/PRESIDENTS RAPPORTEURS8.00-9.00 Inscription (suite et fin)SESSION 1 (Plénière): Message de bienvenue, introduction, et énoncé des Objectifs de l’AtelierObjectif /: A la fin de cette session les participants comprennent a) le contexte et les enjeux b) les objectifs et les principaux axes de l’atelier; et c)les questions opérationnelles liées à la mise en œuvre de projets.9.00-10.00 Message de Mot de bienvenue Thierno Ba Directeur PRODAM Thiendou Niang bienvenue Sénégal Discours Discours Madame le Coordonnateur du Système des Nations Unies au Ministre de l’agriculture Sénégal Buts et Objectifs de Discours Monsieur Béavogui, Directeur de l’Atelier dans le la Division pour l’Afrique de contexte du FIDA l’Ouest et du Centre Discours officiel Discours Son Excellence, le Ministre de d’ouverture l’Agriculture du Sénégal10.00- Pause Café et Photo de Propos liminaire et Conférenciers:10.15 famille questions réponses Son Excellence, Monsieur le Point de presse Ministre de l’agriculture du Sénégal et Monsieur Béavogui, Directeur de la Division Afrique de L’Ouest et du Centre / FIDASession2 (Plénière): Revue contexte régional – politiques, stratégies et contraintesObjectif: A la fin de la session les participants comprennent les politiques et stratégies de l’Afrique de l’ouest et du centre et la nouvelle politique dedécentralisation du FIDA
  12. 12. 10.15- Présentation de Exposé liminaire suivi Ndèye Coumba Fall Thiendou Niang Mouhamed Kella, RFCIP,10.40 l’atelier: objectifs de questions de Directrice Exécutive FRAO Sierra Léone spécifiques, clarification programme et processus et méthodes de travail et logistique10.40- Contexte socio- Exposé introductif suivi Professeur Abdoulaye Diagne,11.00 économique de de questions de Directeur du CRES, Dakar l’Afrique de l’ouest clarification11.00- Stratégies, Politiques Exposé introductif suivi M. Béavogui11.30 et Procédures du FIDA de questions de FIDA clarificationSession 3 (Séance 1: Plénière): Discussion du Panel – Apprendre et Partager sur des défis, les succès et les modalités d’intégration del’approche chaîne de valeur dans les opérations des projets.Objectif: A la fin de la session les participants identifient les défis, les succès et les modalités d’intégration de l’approche chaîne de valeur dans lecontexte de la mise en œuvre de programmes11.30- Expériences sur la Panel suivi de ROPPA Thiendou niang Mouhamed Kella, RFCIP,13.00 chaîne de valeur questions réponses et Musa Salah, ECOBANK Sierra Léone témoignages Penda Gueye Cissé, FEPRODES Sénégal Ousmane Coulibaly, (IITA) PCE/USAID Abdoul Barry, FIDA REP II Ghana13.00- Pause déjeuner14.30SESSION 3 (Séance 2: Sessions parallèles): Apprendre et Partager des expériences sur la chaîne de valeur Choisir votre groupe lors de votre inscription (fiches disponibles au secrétariat).Objectif: à la fin de la session les participants comprennent: a) les liens entre la chaîne de valeur et la consolidation de l’entreprenariat rural b) lesliens entre la chaîne de valeur et la professionnalisation des organisations c) les modes et modalités de financement de la chaîne de valeur d) lesfacteurs et les déterminants de la gouvernance dans la chaîne de valeur 12
  13. 13. Choisir votre groupe: fiches disponibles à l’inscription14.30- Entreprenariat Rural Discussions des Promer II (Sénégal), Modérateur: Rapporteur: Benoît16.00 questions centrales JOSMA(Ghana), Penda Guèye Cissé, Julien Ngayou (Congo) soutenues par des FEPRODES, Sénégal Lompo(Burkina porteurs ) d’expériences Professionnalisation Discussions des Saliou Sarr (CNCR), CBNRMP Modérateur: Thierno Rapporteur: Mme Lydie des Organisations questions centrales (Nigéria), PNDRT (Cameroun) BA (Prodam Sénégal) Nguimbous (PNDRT soutenues par des Cameroun) porteurs d’expériences Modes/Modalités de Discussions des Ecobank, Modérateur: Rapporteur: Ben Financement questions centrales Didier Simon, AFD Mohamed TEJAN Kella Odoemena (Nigéria) soutenues par des Promer II, Sénégal (RCPRP/RFCIP Sierra porteurs RUFIN, Nigeria Leone) d’expériences Bonne Gouvernance Discussions des PCE/USAID, RTIMP (Ghana) Modérateur: Mme Rapporteur: Dawda questions centrales Cécile kwaku (PPMS Maïga (PIDRK Mali) soutenues par des Côte d’Ivoire) porteurs d’expériences16.00- Pause café16.1516.15- SESSION 3 (Séance 2 suite: Sessions parallèles): Apprendre et Partager des expériences sur la chaîne de valeur (Suite)18.0018.00 Cocktail de bienvenue offert par le FIDA19.00 - Session de régulation pédagogique: Thiendou Niang, Ngagne Mbao, Mohamed kebbeh, Ndèye Coumba Fall, Abdou Fall, Martin Raine,19.30 Bamba Zoumana, Perin Saint Ange, Daphné, plus les rapporteurs de la journée19.30- Session de régulation logistique: comité d’organisation + Daphné De Jamblinne De Meux20.00 JOUR 2: MARDI, 9 NOVEMBRE 2010 HEURE ACTIVITES METHODOLOGIE ANIMATEUR MODERATEUR RAPPORTEUR SESSION 3 (Séance 3: Plénière): Apprendre et Partager des expériences sur la chaîne de valeur): Rapport de restitution des sessions 13
  14. 14. parallèles8.30-10.00 Préparation des Discussion sur les Modérateurs et Modérateur de groupe Rapporteur de groupe rapports des points de conclusion Rapporteurs de différents groupes de et recommandations sessions travail10.00-10.15 Pause caféSESSION 3 (Séance 4: Plénière): Apprendre et Partager des expériences sur la chaîne de valeur): Compte rendu des sessionsparallèles10.15-11.00 Présentation des Présentation de Rapporteurs de Rapporteurs de groupe rapports des rapport suivi de sessions différentes sessions questions réponses Thiendou Niang parallèles11.00-11.30 Principaux défis et Débat Participants de la Thiendou Niang perspectives session plénièreSession 4 (Séance 1 Plénière) Exécution et Performance des ProjetsObjectif: A la fin de la session les participants améliorent leurs connaissances des procédures et outils d’exécution des projets11.30-12.30 Leçons et défis liés à Exposé suivi de Panel composé de Thiendou Niang Cletus kayenwee la mise en œuvre de questions réponses / quatre directeurs de (REP II, Ghana) Projets en Afrique de Echanges Projets FIDA: ARSP l’Ouest et du Centre d’expériences (Libéria), PRODER Sud (Congo), CBNRMP-ND (Nigeria), PNAAFA (Guinée), PAPAFPA (Sao Tomé)12.30- Principales Exposé introductif P. Saint Ange, FIDA13.00 Conclusions de la suivi de questions Revue Annuelle du réponses Portefeuille 201013.00-14.00 Pause-déjeunerSESSION 4 (Séance 2: Sessions parallèles): - Exécution et Performance des ProjetsObjectif: A la fin de la session les participants améliorent leurs connaissances des procédures et outils de mise en œuvre des projets 14
  15. 15. Choisir votre groupe lors de votre inscription (fiches disponibles à l’inscription)14.00-16.00 Suivi & Evaluation inventaire des questions Amadou Cissé Ngagne mbao Abdel Kader djenepo spécifiques sur fiche Sylvie Marzin (PIDRN/Mali) individuelle, Steven catégorisation Schonberger Intervention des experts Boubacar Barry suivis (PNAAFFA) Questions-réponses et Discussions Demandes de retrait de inventaire des questions Perin Saint Ange Oumou W Touré Patricia W.Obong fonds et procédures de spécifiques sur fiche Shung Jin kim (Nigéria) passation des marchés individuelle, Mamadou catégorisation Diouldé Sow Intervention des experts suivis Questions-réponses et Discussions Décentralisation du FIDA Présentation de la Loko Nsimpasi Ndèye Coumba Fall Daouda DIA politique et de la Abdoul Barry (Sénégal) stratégie, témoignages, Kadari Gachem Questions-réponses et Ulaç Demirag Discussions Ben Odoemena M.I.TERA Changement d’échelle Présentation des Cheikh Sourang Abdou Fall Mensah BOAKYE (capitalisation et mise à expériences et des cas de Kwasi Antwi REP (Ghana) l’échelle des réalisations) succès de certains projets II (Ghana) Discussion échanges sur PRPODAM les filières riz et manioc (Sénégal) Questions-réponses et Discussions16.00-16.15 Pause-café16.15-18.00 SESSION 4 (Séance 3: Sessions parallèles): - Exécution et Performance des Projets (suite)19.00 -19.30 Session de régulation pédagogique: Thiendou Niang, Ngagne Mbao, Mohamed kebbeh, Ndèye Coumba Fall Abdou Fall, Martin Raine, Bamba Zoumana, Perin Saint Ange plus les rapporteurs de la journée19.30-20.00 Session de régulation logistique: comité d’organisation + Daphne De Jamblinne De Meux 15
  16. 16. 20:00 Soirée Culturelle et dîner offerts par les Projets du Sénégal JOUR 3: MERCREDI, 10 NOVEMBRE 2010HEURE ACTIVITES METHODOLOGIE ANIMATEUR MODERATEUR RAPPORTEUR8.30-16.00 Session 5 (Séance 1): Visite de terrain: Choix d’un porte parole de groupe (Un sénégalais) et d’un rapporteur/ reporter de groupe (un non sénégalais) JOUR 4: JEUDI, 11 NOVEMBRE 2010 HEURE ACTIVITES METHODOLOGIE ANIMATEUR MODERATEUR RAPPORTEUR8.30-09.30 Session 5 (Séance 2) Présentation des rapports Rapporteurs de visite Thiendou Niang Rapporteurs de visite Compte rendu de la visite de visite sous forme de de terrain reportage photos commenté Suivi des échangesSESSION 6: Forger des Synergies et Finalisation des Plans d’action par Pays et PerspectivesObjectif: A la fin de la session les participants évaluent les plans d’action 2010, élaborent les Plans d’action 2011 et examinent les expériences desupervision directe et l’organisation des clusters.Séance 1: sessions parallèles sur les Plans d’Actions, la supervision , la structure des clusters09.30- Sessions parallèles Présentation et Chargés de portefeuille Coordonnateurs de Responsable Suivi-10.15 discussions pays Projets évaluation10.15 - Pause – café10.30SESSION 6 (Séance 1 (suite):10.30- Sessions parallèles Présentation et Chargés de portefeuille Coordonnateurs de Responsable Suivi-13.00 discussions pays Projets évaluation13.00- Pause déjeuner14.0014.00- Préparation des rapports des sessions parallèles CPM team leaders et rapporteurs15.30 16
  17. 17. 15.30 – Restitution des rapports des Partage des principaux Perin Saint Ange Thiendou Niang Mohamed kebbeh16.30 sessions parallèles défis et réponses pour la mise en œuvre des plans d’action 201116.30– Pause café16.45 Séance 2: Evaluation16.45- SESSION 6 (Séance 2 Remplissage Karnon Lofigué et Foly17.00 Plénière): questionnaire Akoussan d’évaluation par les participantsSESSION 7(Séance 1: Plénière): Conclusions, Actions de Suivi et Clôture17.00- Vue d’ensemble – Rapport Présentation du rapport Ahmed Mohamed Thiendou Niang Mohamed Kebbeh18.00 provisoire et mot des participants NORPREP(Ghana) Discours Discours Mr. Mohamed Béavogui, Ministre de Directeur de la Division l’agriculture AOC Clôture de l’atelier Discours Ministre de l’agriculture du Ministre de Sénégal. l’agriculture Conférence de presse Résultats et Conférencier: Zoumana Bamba Zoumana Bamba enseignements de M. Beavogui l’atelier: propos liminaire et questions réponses 17
  18. 18. Annexe 2: Liste des participants Prénoms/First FONCTION/OCCUPATI N° PAYS PROJET/PROJECT NOMS/Last Name Name ON BENIN PADER MESSAN Ahlouinki. Coordonnateur 1 Dieudonné BENIN PADER Mr INOUSSA S. Mamoudou Responsable 2 Administratif et Financier BENIN PADER Mr SEGO SOUNON Théophile Responsable de la 3 Cellule de suivi- évaluation BENIN PACER Mr ALAVO Antonin Bernadin Responsable de l’Appui 4 au Développement des Filières 5 BENIN PADPPA GNAKADJA Gérard Coordonnateur National BENIN PADPPA OYIBOADE Aliou Adéwalé Responsable 6 Administratif et Financier BENIN PADPPA AFFOMASSE Togbéoho Mesmin Responsable Composante 7 Réhabilitation des Plans d’Eaux BENIN PADPPA NOUMONVI Kokouvi. Julien Coordonnateur Régional 8 Sud BENIN Ministère de l’Agriculture Mr SALIFOU Arouna Chef cellule Suivi 9 de l’Elevage et de la évaluation (DPP/MAEP) Pêche 10 BENIN PRONAF/IITA ADETONAH SOUNKOURE Ingénieur Agronome BENIN PRONAF/IITA COULIBALY Ousmane Agroéconoomiste 11 12 BENIN AFRICARICE KIEPE Paul Chef de Programme BENIN IITA ADEOTI Abdou Razack Chercheur 13
  19. 19. 14 BENIN PRONAF/IITA GBAGUIDI BRICE Chercheur15 BENIN PRONAF/IITA ALLOMASSO Raymond Chercheur BENIN AFRICA RICE CENTER KABORE Abdoulaye Socio Economiste/ RA16 BENIN FIDA BELTCHIKA Ndaya CPM17 BURKINA Chambre Régionale SAVADOGO ALIDOU Secrétaire Général18 FASO d’Agriculture BURKINA FIDA KABORE Jean Pascal Chargé dAppui19 FASO Programme FIDA BURKINA PASPRU DABIRE JEAN-CLAUDE Coordonnateur20 FASO BURKINA PASPRU SANON JEAN-CLAUDE Responsable suivi-21 FASO évaluation BURKINA FIDA NIKIEMA LOUBDA TEWENDE KARINE Assistant de Programme22 FASO BURKINA PDRD LOMPO Fimba Julien Coordonnateur23 FASO BURKINA PDRD OUATTARA Sibiri RBP&SE24 FASO BURKINA PICOFA OUEDRAOGO Jacob Coordonnateur National25 FASO BURKINA PICOFA OUATTARA Oulla RSE&P26 FASO BURKINA PIGEPE SOME Térimfar. Ignace Coordonnateur27 FASO BURKINA PIGEPE OUATTARA Idrissa RSE par interim28 FASO BURKINA PROFIL SAWADOGO Hamado Coordonnateur29 FASO BURKINA PROFIL SAWADOGO Justin chargé de filières30 FASO 19
  20. 20. BURKINA Cabinet du Ministre de TRAORE Mahamadou Conseiller technique FASO lAgriculture de31 lHydraulique et des Ressources Halieutiques32 CAMEROUN Point Focal FIDA NGALEU Polycarpe Point Focal CAMEROUN FIDA MARZIN Sylvie CPM3334 CAMEROUN PADMIR NKOUENKEU THOMAS Coordonnateur National35 CAMEROUN FIDA MPOUMA LOGMO Géraldine Consultante36 CAMEROUN PADMIR HAMADOU ALIOUM RSE37 CAMEROUN PNDRT NGUE BISSA Thomas, coordonnateur National CAMEROUN PNDRT Mme. NGO BOUM Lydie, RSE38 EPSE NGUIMBOUS39 CAMEROUN PNDRT BOUBA Bernard, RAF CAMEROUN PADMIR ESSOMBA Ernest Marie Gabriel RAF4041 CAP VERT PNLP AZEVEDO Ramiro Coordonnateur CAP VERT PNLP DIAS Amado Responsable Suivi et42 Evaluation CAP VERT PNLP GUIMARÃES Jorge Responsable Animation43 et Communication COTE MEF ASSE YAO ERIC DIRECTEUR REGIONAL44 DIVOIRE DES MARCHES PUBLICS COTE PPMS Mme.ATTOH née LEONIE RESPONSABLE FILIERES45 DIVOIRE BRA MARAICHERES COTE PPMS Mme.Kouakou Toto Hawé Cécile: Coordinatrice46 DIVOIRE ETHIOPIE Sdxakawa Africa GALIBA Marcel Directeur Régional47 Association48 France AFD THIRION Marie Cécile Chargée de Mission49 France AFD SIMON Didier Economiste 20
  21. 21. GABON Ministère de l’Agriculture Mme. MBENG Yolande Directrice Nationale des50 Projets FIDA GABON PDAR Mme.MBONDJI Hortense Superviseur Composante51 Promotion des Filières Agricoles GABON PDAR MOUNDOUNGA Directeur52 BOUANGA Dieudonné GABON PDAR NDONGJ NGUEMA Roland Responsable53 Administratif et Financier GHANA NRGP Ayariga, Roy National Programme54 Coordinator55 GHANA MOFA Boamah, Ing J.K Chief Director of GHANA NRGP Darimaani Felix Monitoring & Evaluation56 Officer GHANA JOSMA Agro-Industries Ms.Agyeiwaa Sakyi Faustina FARMER / PROCESSOR57 Limited GHANA Ministry of Trade & Adasi Johnson Director of SME Division58 Industry59 GHANA RTIMP ADJEKUM Akwasi Adjei Coordinator GHANA NORPREP AHMED MOHAMMED PROGRAMME60 COORDINATOR61 GHANA RAFIP AMOAH KOBINA Programme Coordinator GHANA Adventist Development ASANTE-MENSAH SAMUEL DIRECTOR, Agriculture62 and Relief Agency and Food Security Projects GHANA REP Attah-Antwi Kwasi Project Coordinator63 GHANA RTIMP BOAKYE MENSAH Monitoring and64 Evaluation Specialist GHANA REP Kayenwee Cletus Monitoring & Evaluation65 Officer 21
  22. 22. GHANA RAFIP MENSAH RAYMOND M&E SPECIALIST66 GHANA REP Mme.Amponsah Irene Administrative &67 Procurement Officer GHANA MINISTRY OF FINANCE NKANSAH EDMUND KWABENA HEAD,68 AND ECONOMIC BADEA/IFAD/OPEC UNIT PLANNING GHANA Northern Youth for Yahaya Abdul-Rauf69 Peace and Development GHANA NORPREP YIAH SABASTIAN SALIA Programme Engineer70 GHANA IFAD Daniel PASOS Financial Management71 Specialist GHANA IFAD Dominique ULAC CPM72 GHANA Northern rural growth AYARIGA ROY National programm73 programm Coordinator GHANA Adyewaa SAKY Processor74 GHANA Ministry of Local OPOKU - BOAMAH Alex Directeur PBME75 Government NORPEP GHANA IFAD Ghana Country ASHU Sarah Country Programm76 Office Assistant GUINEE PRRDC DABO AMADU DIRECTEUR TECHNIQUE77 BISSAU GUINEE PRRDC MARTINS MARCELINO COORDONNATEUR78 BISSAU GUINEE PRRDC SANTIAGO HELDER ATP79 BISSAU GUINEE PADER-BGN Sylla Mandiou Responsable suivi-80 CONAKRY évaluation GUINEE PADER-BGN BANGOURA Djibril TAMSIR COORDONNATEUR81 CONAKRY GUINEE PNAAFA BARRY Boubacar RSE82 CONAKRY 22
  23. 23. GUINEE Fédération des Mme.CAMARA Foulématou Présidente CONAKRY Organisations Paysannes83 de Basse-Guinée (FOP- BG) GUINEE MINISTERE DE BAH Abdoulaye Wansan Chef Section FINEX84 CONAKRY LECONOMIE ET DES FINANCES GUINEE PNAAFA NABE Aboubacar Responsable85 CONAKRY Administratif et Financier GUINEE PRODAD-GF/PNAAFA SIDIBE Mamadou Bailo Coordinateur National86 CONAKRY GUINEE PADER-BGN SOUMAH ALY SEYDOUBA Responsable87 CONAKRY Administratif et Financier GUINEE FIDA BARRY Mamadou Consultant88 CONAKRY MALADHO GUINEE PACV TOURE Alhassane Aminata Coordonnateur National89 CONAKRY GUINEE SOW Mamadou diouldé Consultant90 CONAKRY ITALY IFAD CHELAGA Monica Programme Assistant91 ITALY WCA SARR Léopold CPM/Mali, Gabon,92 Gambie93 ITALY IFAD SPARACINO Cristiana CPM ITALY FIDA BARTOLUCCI Alessia Programme Assistant9495 ITALY FIDA CRESWELL BOB Accountant ITALY FIDA NSIMPASI Luyaku Loko Chargé de portefeuille9697 ITALY FIDA KIM Chung Jin Consultant IFAD ITALY FIDA KOUAKOU SARA Associate country98 programm Manager 23
  24. 24. 99 ITALY FIDA Dadush Sarah Juriste100 ITALY FIDA URCINOLI Maria Carolina Programme Assistant101 ITALY FIDA ABUKARI Moses Yao Project Officer102 ITALY FIDA ANDREA SERPAGLI CPM ITALY FIDA RETTA Bethlem Administrative Assistant103 Programm for Senegal104 ITALY FIDA ARNOUX Sylvie Conseiller Juridique ITALY FIDA UNTERNAEHRER Cécile Associate Programm105 Officer ITALY FIDA DUJEUX Laetitia Assistante de106 Programme107 ITALY FIDA BAMBA Zoumana KM Officer108 ITALY FIDA GALASTRO Vincenzo Chargé de portefeuille109 ITALY FIDA LHOMMEAU Annabelle Chargée de Programme ITALY FIDA PIQUION- Elsie Programm Assistant110 ALDERIGHI ITALY FIDA AIELLO Richard Learning Manager111 ITALY FIDA NSINUI BARROS AMBROSIO Economist en chargé des112 deux Congo ITALY FIDA CUNEO Daniela Communication113 Assistant114 ITALY FIDA BEAVOGUI Mohamed Directeur AOC115 ITALY FIDA DE JAMBLINNE DAPHNE ITALY FIDA CAMERON VIRGINIA Chargée Prêts et Dons116117 ITALY FIDA TOUNESSI MOHAMED CPM ITALY FIDA SAMIR Reteune Manager Knowledge118 Internet Communication ITALY FIDA RAINE Martin Training Consultant119 24
  25. 25. ITALY FIDA SOURANG Cheikh Senior Programm120 Manager121 ITALY FIDA BARRY Abdoul Wahab CPM LIBERIA Ministry of Agriculture Krah Patrick M & E & Gender Officer122 /ASRP LIBERIA Ministry of Agriculture Thomas Priscilla Accountant123 /ASRP MALI Cellule de Dialogue sur COULIBALY Bakary Sékou Responsable124 les Politiques de Lutte contre la Pauvreté (CDP) MALI Coordination Nationale COULIBALY Ibrahim Directeur125 des Organisations Paysannes (CNOP126 MALI PIDRN DIALLO Hamzata Moussa Directeur MALI PIDRN DJENEPO Abdel Kader Responsible chargé de127 Suivi Evaluation MALI PIDRK MAIGA Daouda Directeur128 MALI PIDRK MOHAMED ALI Mme.Mariama W. Responsable129 Med ALI Administratif et Financier MALI CNPPF NADIO Mamadou Coordinateur National130 MALI PMR SIDIBE Dramane Directeur131 MALI FODESA TIERO Mamadou Coordonnateur Regional132 MAURITANI FIDA GANDEGA SYLLI Point Focal133 E MAURITANI PROLPRAF Ould Ahmed Salem RAF134 E Abderrahmane MAURITANI PDDO MOHAMED MOHAMEDOU COORDINATEUR135 E MAHMOUD 25
  26. 26. MAURITANI PDDO OULD ABDELLAHI MOHAMED RESPONSIBLE136 E TECHNIQUE137 NIGER PPILDA Guéro Chaibou Directeur138 NIGER PAC II Assadeck Mohamed Coordonnateur NIGER PAC II Maï Tanimoune Moustapha Coordonnateur Régional139 NIGER Réseau National des Youssouf Mohamed Elmoctar SG-RECA140 Chambres d’Agriculture (RECA) NIGER Ministère de l’Agriculture Diamoitou Guessibo Boukari Secrétaire Général141 et de l’Elevage (MAGEL) NIGERIA IFAD-CBARDP KANKIA Abu Yusuf National Programme142 Coordinator, NIGERIA RFIBP Abdulazeez Muyiwa National Programme143 Coordinator NIGERIA RFIBP Mme.Ufaruna Angelina, Uneku Monitoring &Evaluation144 Specialist NIGERIA NACRDB)/RFIBP Kolo Ndako Mahmud Assistant General145 Manager NIGERIA IFAD-CBNRMP Mme.Jumbo- Irene National Programme146 Ibeakuzie Coodinator NIGERIA IFAD-CBNRMP Gbinigie Ian Monitoring and147 Evaluation NIGERIA IFAD-CBNRMP Mme.Udosen Iniabasi Gender/CDDOfficer148 26
  27. 27. NIGERIA Country Office Abuja WILLS OBONG Patricia Programm Assistant149 NIGERIA IFAD Odoemena Ben150 NIGERIA Ministry of Agriculture Nwadike Augustine C. B Permanent Secretary151 and Natural Resources, Imo State République FIDA Bureau Terrain SANSI RITA Assistante152 du CONGO Administrative République FIDA KALIBU MINO153 du CONGO République FIDA MPUTU Monique Chargée dappui terrain154 du CONGO Republique PRODER 3 KENGA Dominique coordonnateur155 du CONGO Republique PRODER 3 EBONDZI Alain Roger RAF156 du CONGO Republique PRODER 3 NGAYOU Benoit RSE157 du CONGO Republique Bureau de liaison Mme.IBARRA Judith Virginie Responsable BL158 du CONGO Republique MAE DIANSONSA DIATSONAMA Chef de service des159 du CONGO Médard finances et du matériel Republique PRODER SUD NZ EMBA Marcel Dieudonne Responsable de du CONGO Composante appui à la160 production et à la commercialisation 27
  28. 28. Republique PRODER SUD BABINGUI Evariste Aurelten RPSE161 du CONGO Republique PRODER SUD OKANDZA Rock Martial RAF162 du CONGO Republique PRODER SUD BIZIBANDOKI Paul Coordonnateur163 du CONGO Republique Ministere des Finances LIKAMBIABEKA Guy Hermey Representant164 du CONGO Republique PRODER Nord NDINGA Eugene, Assistant a la du CONGO Composante165 Developpement Agricole et Halieutique Republique PRODER Nord MBENGUE Guy Flugence RSE166 du CONGO RDC PRAPE SUMBELA Antoine Coordonnateur National167 RDC PRAPE SAIDI Emmanuel Responsable de Suivi –168 Evaluation RDC PRAPE KOBONGO Marcellin Responsable du Pool169 Technique RDC PRAPE KALIBU Justin Responsable de la170 Composante Halieutique RDC Fédération des Unions LIMELE Camille Président171 des Producteurs Agricoles (FUOPA) 28
  29. 29. RDC PRAPO BULUBULU Jean Damas Coordonnateur172 RDC PRAPO BAHANDI Célestin Responsable de Suivi –173 Evaluation RDC MINAGRI LIYEYE Jean Pierre Inspecteur Provincial de174 l’Agriculture RDC PRODER KENGA Dominique dominique.kenga@yaho175 o.fr RDC Direction de l’Analyse, MAMPUYA Christophe Coordonnateur Planification et176 Prospection – Ministère de l’Agriculture SAO TOME PAPAFPA Martins Ramos Francisco Responsable de la filière177 ET Poivre et épices PRINCIPE SAO TOME PAPAFPA Balmisse Sebastien Pierre Assistant technique178 ET Albert PRINCIPE SAO TOME Ministère du Plan et Boa Morte Filipe Assesseur du Ministre ET Développement179 PRINCIPE SENEGAL Radio GUINDIKU SOW Thierno Journaliste180 SENEGAL CORAF/ WECARD SEREME Paco Directeur Exécutif181 SENEGAL PRODAM WANE Aïcha OP182 29
  30. 30. SENEGAL PRODAM BA THIERNO DIRECTEUR183 SENEGAL PRODAM FAYE IBRAHIMA Responsable de Suivi et184 Evaluation SENEGAL USAID BADIANE Aminata NIANE185 SENEGAL OP -Région de Matam Mme THIAM AICHA Présidente186 SENEGAL PSAOP Mme.DIOP KHADY COMPTABLE187 SENEGAL PSAOP BARRY Mamadou188 Moustapha SENEGAL PSAOP NDIAYE Ousmane Directeur National189 SENEGAL PSAOP Mme.Diagne Rouguillatou Chargée du Suivi &190 Evaluation SENEGAL ONUDI KOFFI EDME Représentant191 SENEGAL Cabinet MECA Touré Oumou WANE Expert Comptable192 SENEGAL PAFA DIOUF Sémou Coordonnateur193 SENEGAL PAFA DIOUF Mamadou Responsable194 Administratif et Financier 30
  31. 31. SENEGAL PAFA Mme.BA Aissatou SPICV / EG (Spécialiste pour l’inclusion des195 couches vulnérables et l’égalité du genre SENEGAL PAFA Mme.DIOUF Seynabou Assistante au196 Coordonnateur SENEGAL PAFA Mme.SOW Khady NDIAYE Responsable Suivi-197 Evaluation SENEGAL PAFA DIENG Amadou Spécialiste en198 développement des Filières SENEGAL PROMER II MBENGUE Hyacinthe Modou Coordonnateur199 SENEGAL PROMER II TEW El Hadji Samba Responsable200 Diène Administratif et Financier SENEGAL PROMER II SOW Nogaye OP201 SENEGAL PROMER II CISSE Moustapha Responsable des202 Opérations Techniques SENEGAL PROMER II COULIBALY Coura Chef Comptable203 SENEGAL PROMER II SEYDI Ameth Hady Responsable National du204 SAFIR SENEGAL PROMER II Mme.SANE Fatoumata Responsable du Suivi205 Evaluation SENEGAL PROMER II MmeBOUSSO Hawa Sow Documentaliste206 31
  32. 32. SENEGAL PROMER II DIEBAKHATE Hawa Assistante207 Coordonnateur SENEGAL PROMER II SOW Fatimata Assistante de Direction208 SENEGAL PROMER II THIAM Mamadou Prestataire209 SENEGAL PROMER II SIDIBE Diénaba Présidente Nationale210 DINFEL SENEGAL OP/PROMER II FAYE Mbaye OP211 SENEGAL FENAPH ATHIE Gora Président212 SENEGAL DINFEL Mme. DIALLO Oumou Khaïry Présidente213 SENEGAL FRAO BAH Mariama Consultante214 SENEGAL IFPRI FOFANA Ismael Chercheur215 SENEGAL MANORE FM NDIAYE Lamine Journaliste216 SENEGAL PCE USAID VOISARD Jean Michel SR VC Manager217 SENEGAL CARREFOUR AFRIQUE NDIAYE Alé Consultant218 32
  33. 33. SENEGAL PROMER / Kolda Gnamadio Abdoulaye219 SENEGAL DCEF MEF NDIAYE DIOP Maguette Chargé de programme220 SENEGAL PNUD SOW Mame Ngoné Spécialiste221 Communication SENEGAL DAPS-Sénégal DIARRA Ngolo Chef de la Division222 Projets et Programmes SENEGAL DAPS-Sénégal THIAM Goumbo Agroéconoomiste223 SENEGAL FRAO CISSE Amadou Consultant224 SENEGAL FRAO KOUROUMA THIAM Saran Responsable225 Administratif SENEGAL FRAO THIAW Aïta Secrétaire226 SENEGAL MINISTERE DIENE MAME NDIOBO Conseiller technique227 AGRICULTURE SENEGAL MINISTERE TALL Safiétou Secrétaire228 AGRICULTURE SENEGAL MINISTERE FALL Ndèye Sokhna Secrétaire229 AGRICULTURE SENEGAL FRAO FALL Abdou Responsable de230 Prorgramme / Consultant FIDAFRIQUE 33
  34. 34. SENEGAL FRAO FALL Coumba Directrice231 SENEGAL FRAO MBAO Ngagne Coordonnateur232 Programme SENEGAL FRAO LOFIGUE Karnon Assistant de programme233 SENEGAL Direction de la Dette et BARRY Mamadou responsable des de Moustapha décaissements projets234 l’Investissement/DDI- MINAGRI SENEGAL FRAO KEBBEH Mouhamed Consultant interne235 SENEGAL WALF NDIAYE Alioune Consultant journaliste236 web SENEGAL FEPRODES CISSE Penda Gueye Présidente237 SENEGAL FIDA DOUCOURE Khadidja Regional Gender238 Coordination SENEGAL FIDA GHACHEM KADARI CPM i239 SENEGAL FIDA MERCADAL Sophie Assistante Programme240 FIDA SENEGAL FIDA KONARE Dounamba Assistante Programme241 SENEGAL CNCR GUEYE Samba Président242 34
  35. 35. SENEGAL ASPRODEB SARR Saliou243 SENEGAL DIOP Aysatou Ndiaye Consultante244 SENEGAL EXCO AFRIQUE TERA Moulaye Idrissa Consultant245 SENEGAL AFD GOMIS Simon Chargé de programme246 de développement rural SENEGAL USAID/WULA NAFAA DIOP Amath Chef de volet création247 de richesses SENEGAL USAID/WULA NAFAA BALDE Ousmane Spécialiste BDS248 SENEGAL USAID WULA NAFAA COLY Bineta Responsable249 Marketing/Credit SENEGAL CORAF/ WECARD MULUH George Achu Planning Officer250 SENEGAL INTER PRESS SERVICE FAYE Souleymane Stringer251 (IPS) SENEGAL Afrique Communication NIANG Thiendou Directeur252 SENEGAL ONU DJIGO Fatou Binetou Représentant Résident253254 SENEGAL LE POPULAIRE FOFANA Bachir Journaliste 35
  36. 36. SENEGAL RTS/TV BARRY Abdoulaye Journaliste255 SENEGAL CMC FALL Abdoulaye Coordinateur256 SENEGAL LERAL.NET(Site dinfos) NGOM Ibrahima Journaliste Reporter257 SENEGAL AGENCE DE PRESSE CISSE Birane Hady Journaliste258 SENEGALAISE (APS) SENEGAL APS SEYDI Dieylani Reporter photographe259 SENEGAL APS LAMRANI fatime Journaliste260 SENEGAL PANA COULIBALY Bakary Journaliste261 SENEGAL WADR BA Abdoul Journaliste262 SENEGAL SOLEIL MBODJ Papa Adama Journaliste263 SIERRA Réhabilitation and AMADU FESTUS Monitoring and264 LEONNE Country Base poverty Evaluation Officer Reduction Project SIERRA RCPRP/RFCIP TEJAN-KELLA MOHAMED Responsable des265 LEONNE décaissements SIERRA RCPRP/RFCIP KAMARA PETER M. PROGRAMME266 LEONNE COORDINATOR 36
  37. 37. SIERRA RCPRP/RFCIP AMADU FESTUS O. MONITORING &267 LEONNE EVALUATION OFFICER SIERRA BIO – UNITED LIMITED LAHAI MICHAEL K. FINANCIAL268 LEONNE CONTROLLER SIERRA MINISTRY OF SANKOH FRANCIS A. R. ASSISTANT MANAGER LEONNE AGRICULTURE269 FORESTRY AND FOOD SECURITY - MAFFS SIERRA RCPRP/RFCIP AMADU FESTUS Monitoring and270 LEONNE evaluation officer TCHAD PROHYPA BRAHIM TAHA DAHAB DIRECTOR GENERAL271 TCHAD PROHYPA HABIB SALEH BRAHIM Directeur du Projet272 TCHAD PROHYPA ABOUKAR ABDOU ADJI Responsable273 Administratif et Financier TCHAD Ministère de l’Eau ABDOULAYE SOULEYMANE Directeur de l’Hydralique274 NOUREN Pastorale TCHAD Association des Eleveurs KHADIDJA GUIRSIMI Membre275 Nomades du Tchad276 TOGO IFDC -NWAFD SOGBEDJI M. Jean Coordonnateur DE projet 37
  38. 38. Annexe 3: Liste des plans d’actions • Plan d’action programme-pays RDC (PRAPE, PRAPO et PIRAM) • Plan d’action 2011 Congo • plans d’actions 2011 Mauritanie Niger • Plan de Travail des Pays Lusophones (São Tome et Principe; Cap Vert) • Paln d’actions 2011 Burkina Faso, Tchad, Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone et Togo 38

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