Ignite AMATYC 2012 First Half

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Presentations 1-11 of Ignite AMATYC, Jacksonville, FL, November 9, 2012

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Ignite AMATYC 2012 First Half

  1. 1. Doctor Strange-Rob OR How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love Assessment!
  2. 2. What is Assessment?
  3. 3. Formative AssessmentUsually atthe startCorrecterrors thatcan lead tobiggerproblems
  4. 4. SummativeAssessmentUsually at theend of a blockof time.Think FinalExam
  5. 5. Assessment Test!
  6. 6. It has many disguisesDaily QuizzesGroup QuizzesDiscussionsClickersWriting ProjectsHomeworkPractice Tests
  7. 7. Daily and Group Quizzes๏ How does this work in the grade book?๏ What if someone doesn’t pull their weight?
  8. 8. Group DiscussionsCould be onlineEach person writea sentence in aparagraphRandom draw toexplain to theclass
  9. 9. Clickers Or Voting Questions๏ Does NOT require electronics!๏ There are tons of resources out there – use them!
  10. 10. Writing Assignments๏ Could be short๏ Alone or in a group๏ Explaining is the key
  11. 11. Online Homework Is Your FriendTakes care of thedrill problemsImmediate feedbackTimed quizzes toimprove speed
  12. 12. We Don’t Teach HereThere are no magic answers!
  13. 13. Review QuizzesIn the online homework systemOnly if we do not have an examBecause of these, rarely do I hear in Calculus“Wait, what is the product rule again?”
  14. 14. Practice Tests Keep Students on Schedule๏ What is covered this block๏ How much is covered in the semester
  15. 15. Practice Tests Remind Them of the Major IdeasNo need to createa review anymoreSometimes this isa wake up call!Also eliminatesthe sectioncheating.
  16. 16. How Fast? - Practice Tests
  17. 17. Your Free Time Will VanishSetting up questions will take timeYou will findyourself looking forquestionseverywhereDon’t re-invent thewheel, useresources!
  18. 18. Your Workload will Increase๏ Writing good questions takes time๏ Grading takes time๏ Lining up assignments๏ Yep, takes time๏ So introduce these things in stages
  19. 19. Students Will Sing Your Praises!๏ Just not to you!๏ Their next teacher will also sing your praises.๏ No promises on how loudly they sing
  20. 20. Dr. Strange-Roba.k.a. Rob Eby@RobEbymathdudeA copy and links attinyurl.com/8gbozpf
  21. 21. Livin’ and Lovin’the Live BindersPeg Hohensee, Ph.D.Kaplan University
  22. 22. Student Support Materials๏ Students not using your resources?๏ Students not finding your resources?๏ Students getting frustrated?
  23. 23. Live Binder Power ๏ Nearly 40,000 hits in 5 months ๏ Now ≈3000 hits per week!
  24. 24. Live Binders๏ Free service or pay service
  25. 25. Live Binders๏ Free service or pay service๏ Organizes resources
  26. 26. Live Binders๏ Free service or pay service๏ Organizes resources๏ Static links
  27. 27. Live Binders๏ Free service or pay service๏ Organizes resources๏ Static links๏ Dynamic organization
  28. 28. Live Binders๏ Free service or pay service๏ Organizes resources๏ Static links๏ Dynamic organization“Your 3-ring binder for the web” www.livebinders.com – retrieved 10/16/12
  29. 29. Live Bind Link๏ Embed in class or center๏ One url instead of a list of resources
  30. 30. Live Binder Shelves:(each class?)
  31. 31. Live Binder: (each unit?)
  32. 32. Live Binder: (tabs – each topic?)
  33. 33. Easy to create!
  34. 34. Multiple Layouts
  35. 35. Tools:๏ LiveBinder It Bookmarklet
  36. 36. Tools:๏ LiveBinder It Bookmarklet๏ iPad App๏ TeacherCast App๏ Chrome App
  37. 37. Tools:๏ LiveBinder It Bookmarklet๏ iPad App๏ TeacherCast App๏ Chrome App๏ Links to your Blog or Website
  38. 38. Public Binders
  39. 39. Live Binder Servicewww.livebinders.com
  40. 40. QuestionsPlease contact:Peg Hohensee, Ph.D.Director of Math Across the CurriculumKaplan Universityphohensee@kaplan.edu
  41. 41. Nice to Meet You!Virtual Introductions in an Online World
  42. 42. Michelle LisKaplan University
  43. 43. How can you getto know andremember yourstudents?How canstudents get toknow oneanother?
  44. 44. Voicethread + Wikispaces = Connections!
  45. 45. Voicethread
  46. 46. Sign up for aVoicethread Account
  47. 47. Create a Voicethread
  48. 48. You can upload: ๏ Images ๏ Documents ๏ Videos
  49. 49. Comment to add audio
  50. 50. Publishing Options
  51. 51. Ways to share
  52. 52. Pick Embed and Copy code
  53. 53. Wikispaces
  54. 54. Create an account
  55. 55. Create a Wiki
  56. 56. Helpful Hints
  57. 57. Go to Edit – Widget – OtherHTML and paste your code
  58. 58. Page full of introductions
  59. 59. Done!
  60. 60. Contact info: Michelle Lismlis@kaplan.edu
  61. 61. Helping Our Students byRecalling Our Teachers John C. Miller The City College of C.U.N.Y.
  62. 62. Statement #4๏ Our teachers’ teachers’ teachers’ teachers routinely asked their students to show all their steps.
  63. 63. Statement #3๏ Our teachers’ teachers’ teachers routinely asked their students to show all their steps.
  64. 64. Statement #2๏ Our teachers’ teachers routinely asked their students to show all their steps.
  65. 65. Statement #1๏ Our teachers routinely asked us to show all our steps.
  66. 66. Statement #1 (more examples)๏ Miss Llewelyn๏ Miss Trupiano๏ Miss Koithan๏ Mr. Gould๏ Miss Sullivan๏ Miss Sipson Miss Bessie M. Koithan’s Sixth Grade John E. Pound Elementary School๏ Mr. Reed Lockport, N.Y. 1949-50๏ Mr. Gideon
  67. 67. Statement #1 (an exception)๏ Let’s stipulate that “teachers” means teachers at the undergraduate level and below. Prof. E. R. Kolchin Columbia University
  68. 68. Statement #0๏ We routinely ask our students to show all their steps ...
  69. 69. Statement #0 (continued)๏ … in order to provide optimal feedback if the last step is incorrect.
  70. 70. Statement # -1๏ We routinely ask our students to purchase math software that accepts only short final answers.
  71. 71. Example #1: Problem and Solution
  72. 72. Example #1: Program’s Response
  73. 73. Example #2: Problem and Solution
  74. 74. Example #2: Program’s Response
  75. 75. Example #3: Problem and Solution
  76. 76. Example #3: Program’s Response
  77. 77. We Disposed of Multiple-Choice We complained loudly and in large numbers about multiple-choice in the early 1990’s. A publisher responded by developing software that accepted any final step. All the other publishers followed suit!
  78. 78. We’ve Settled For Short Answers  No similar groundswell is apparent today concerning the limitations of short answers.
  79. 79. Why Have We Settled? 1. We’re too slow-witted to have noticed. 2. We don’t care about our students. 3. We are too lazy or too timid. 4. We are terrified of intelligent software.
  80. 80. What’s To Be Done?  Punch out the messenger.  Honor our pedagogical ancestors by protesting to publishers about the serious limitations of their short answer software.
  81. 81. THE PIZZAZZ TEACHERTEACHING OUT OF THE BOX
  82. 82. …….PIZZAZZ…….IT IS LIKE EATING A………PIZZAIT IS ENJOYABLE……..IT IS MOTIVATING…….IT CREATES EXCITEMENT……..IT PLACES A SKILL INLONG-TERM MEMORY……..
  83. 83. PIZZAZZ INSTRUCTORS THE STUDENTS WILL KEEP DESIRING MORE MATHEMATICAL INSTRUCTION
  84. 84. COLLEGE PROFESSORA COLLEGE PROFESSOR SAID……… “LET’S ADD SOME SPICES TO MY INSTRUCTION TODAY”. “ LET’S ADD SOME FLAVOR”. “LET’S ADD SOME HUMOR”“MY TEACHING NEEDSSOME PIZZAZZ !”
  85. 85. EFFECTS OF “PIZZAZZ”WILL HELP BRAIN’S MEMORY STATION1. RECEIVE INFORMATION2. RETAIN INFORMATION3. RECALL INFORMATION
  86. 86. BILL GATES FOUNDATION2010 COLLEGE STATISTICS31.3% GRADUATE IN 4- YEARS56 % GRADUATE IN 6- YEARS
  87. 87. MATHEMATICS: “ STEM”๏ MATHEMATICS: “A FILTER CLASS“๏ “STEM COURSE” SCIENCE / TECHNOLOGYENGINEERING /MATHEMATICS
  88. 88. EXAMPLE: “PIZZAZZ”MICKEY MOUSE : “ IMAGINARY” GUY “NOT REAL” IMAGINARY NUMBERS Ii, 2i , 3i, 4i, 5i, 6i
  89. 89. MICKEY MOUSE
  90. 90. SPIDER MAN
  91. 91. TIGER WILL HELP! COMPLEX NUMBERSa+bi4+7i
  92. 92. EXAMPLE: “PIZZAZZ” TRIGONOMETRY HOME! HOME! HOMELESS!
  93. 93. WHO HAS A HOME ?
  94. 94. WHO HAS A HOME ?
  95. 95. WHERE IS TANGENT ?
  96. 96. EXPONENTIAL GROWTH
  97. 97. EXPONENTIAL DECAY
  98. 98. PLAN AHEAD!! ADD A LITTLE HUMOR! ADD A LITTLE FUN! ADD A LITTLE “PIZZAZZ”
  99. 99. ...……… AMERICA….……..PRESIDENT BUSH SAID......IF WE MAKE SURE THAT AMERICA’SSTUDENTS SUCCEED IN LIFE……THEN THEY WILL MAKE SURE THATAMERICA SUCCEEDS IN THE WORLD……
  100. 100. HTML Embed Code, Peer Review and the Cloud Fred Feldon Coastline CC Fountain Valley, CA
  101. 101. Mathematical Discussion Should Be the “Heart” of All Your Classes
  102. 102. Mathematical Discussion Should Be the “Heart” of All Your Classes “There must be far less telling on the part of theteacher, and far more doingon the part of the student.” Jean Piaget
  103. 103. Academic Content inOnline Discussion Boards
  104. 104. http://www.techsmith.com/jing
  105. 105. Add “HTML Embed Code”Button to Jing
  106. 106. Add “HTML Embed Code”Button to Jing
  107. 107. Copy “HTML Embed Code”to Clipboard
  108. 108. Pasting “HTML Embed Code”into Discussion BoardCourseCompass (Old Design)
  109. 109. Pasting “HTML Embed Code” into Discussion Board PearsonMyLab (New Design)Right Click Here
  110. 110. Peer Review and Cloud ComputingLiberal Arts Math Writing and Research Component -- Choose One:
  111. 111. “Peer review raises academic standards in the classroom.” Carol Boston, ERIC Clearinghouse on Assessment and Evaluation, University of Maryland, College Park, 2002“When students are asked to write for one another, they write more effectively.” Richard Light, Harvard University, 2003“Peer review ensures that the material is correct, as well as relevant, original and well written for the readers.” Ellen Yi-Luen Do, Department of Architecture, University of Washington, 2004 “Peer review ensures the quality of papers that are published, sets scientific standards of the discipline and subtler standards of collegiality, behavior and ethics.” Ethics of Peer Review: A Guide for Manuscript Reviewers, Sara Rockwell, Ph.D., Yale University School of Medicine, 2005“Collaborative peer review is well suited as a formative evaluation.” Larry Keig and Michael Waggoner, Truman State University, The Center for Teaching and Learning, 1994
  112. 112. http://writer.zoho.com
  113. 113. MOOC: Massive open online courseshttps://www.coursera.org/course/maththink https://www.coursera.org/course/precalculus
  114. 114. PatrickJMT on YouTube
  115. 115. I’ve never done this well in a math class. I learned I can do math! The curiositywe had as kids fades away and now we need practical applications. This classhas it! I especially enjoyed reading everyone’s video project report (and writingmy own). – AS Spring 2012This is the first math class I’ve actually enjoyed, ever! Math C100 (Liberal ArtsMath) is one of the best courses I’ve ever taken. – RM Fall 2011This is the most valuable and relevant math class I’ve ever taken. I learnednew things and found new Internet sites I’ll be sharing with my whole family. Iwill recommend this course to friends over and over. – LG Summer 2011The video project made me go from being terrified of math to being totallyrespectful and in awe of math. Anyone frustrated with algebra or geometryshould take this course. – GG Spring 2011I recommend this class to everyone. I always wondered where and whenanyone would use math. This course answered that question: Everywhere andall the time! – MB Fall 2010This course should be a requirement for all college students. Seriously! You’renot just memorizing stuff. You’re learning how to explain and better understandthe world around you. – SL Summer 2010
  116. 116. Thank You ffeldon@coastline.eduThis presentation is available to download at http://www.slideshare.net/ffeldon Related videos are at http://www.youtube.com/ffeldon
  117. 117. Luke WalshCatawba ValleyCommunity CollegeHickory, NC
  118. 118. FRIENDSJOB FAMILY LIFE
  119. 119. BEING YOUR BESTTOO MUCH TIMEON YOUR HANDS
  120. 120. TIMe
  121. 121. TIMe BIRTH YEAR
  122. 122. 1882 1882YEAR YeAR
  123. 123. JOINHANDS
  124. 124. 2 MUCH TIMe
  125. 125. RAISe AWAReNeSS
  126. 126. BeCAUSe OF THeIR TIMe, I HAVe 2 MUCH TIMe ON MY HANDS.
  127. 127. Smart Pens: Past, Present, and Future Lawrence Perez Saddleback Collegepast present future
  128. 128. Marggraff had an epiphany about educational toys while watching his 4-year- old learn to read. Source: http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/13.11/leapfrog.htmlpast present future
  129. 129. Source: http://www.papershow.com/us/ Source: http://www.livescribe.com/en-us/smartpen/echo/past present future
  130. 130. Source: http://www.danedigital.com/6-Zpen/past present future
  131. 131. Students hear the instructor and see themselves writing down lecture notes.past present future
  132. 132. How can this technology enhance Students hear the student learning? and see instructor themselves writing down lecture notes.past present future
  133. 133. Next, the student and a faculty member Aanalyze the student’s work and reflect on the student is filmed demonstrating a learning student’s verbal explanation. outcome while verbally explaining the work.past present future
  134. 134. Next, the student and a faculty member analyze the student’s work and reflect on the student’s verbal explanation.past present future
  135. 135. Solve for x. 4+x=-6past present future
  136. 136. Solve for x. 4+x=-6past present future
  137. 137. Source: http://www.units.muohio.edu/servicelearning/node/316past present future
  138. 138. How can this technology benefit educators? Source: http://www.units.muohio.edu/servicelearning/node/316past present future
  139. 139. Place Objective Determine the place value of a 1 value a number. digit in The position of a digit in a number determines its place value. Video Example 1: Find a pattern for place value in a whole number. Video Worksheet 3 9 0 , 5 8 4 , 7 2 6. Ones place. Tens place. One-millions place. Hundreds place. Ten-millions place. One-thousands place. Assessment Hundred-millions Ten-thousands place. place. Hundred-thousands place.past present future
  140. 140. past present future
  141. 141. How can this technology improve communication between educators and students in the online environment?past present future
  142. 142. y 8 Graph y x 2 4 x -8 -4 4 8 -4 -8past present future
  143. 143. y 8 Graph y x 2 4 x -8 -4 4 8 -4 -8past present future
  144. 144. y 8 Graph y x 2 4 x -8 -4 4 8 -4 -8past present future
  145. 145. y 8 Graph y x 2 4 x -8 -4 4 8 -4 -8past present future
  146. 146. y 8 Graph y x 2 4 Larry Perez Saddleback College -8 -4 4 8 x -4 LPerez@saddleback.edu -8 Imagine how difficult it would be for student to cheat using this format.past present future
  147. 147. Math Anxiety, Test Anxiety,and Working Memory:Modifications that help highlyanxious students in coping withtraditional assessments Chris L. Yuen CLYUEN@buffalo.edu University at Buffalo, SUNY AMATYC Annual Conference ITLC Sponsored Ignite Event November 9, 2012
  148. 148. Math anxiety vs. test anxiety• Math anxiety was viewed as an extensionof test anxiety in the 60’s and 70’s.• Both were viewed as a psychologicalconstruct.
  149. 149. Math anxiety vs. test anxiety • But we will soon see that it is both a cognitive and psychological construct, which learners have both emotional and strategic responses to cope with the anxiety.
  150. 150. Math anxiety as an independent phenomenon• Ashcraft et al. (2002, 2005, 2009) askedindividuals to read controlled passages ofordinary narratives and treatmentpassages where content words arereplaced by mathematical words.
  151. 151. Math anxiety as anindependentphenomenon• They found that the error rates inreading the treatment passages weresignificantly higher than those in thecontrolled passages.• These findings aim to isolate testanxiety from mathematics anxiety.
  152. 152. Research on letter recallIt was as if the high math-anxiousparticipants were participating in a three-way competition for their limited workingmemory resources: difficult math, letterretention and recall, and their own mathanxiety. The load on working memorybecame so pronounced that theirperformance deteriorated markedly—affective drop (Ashcraft & Moore, 2009, p.202).
  153. 153. Research on letter recall It was working memory that was compromised in [the] study of college students’ performance and math anxiety; working memory suffered the brunt of the math anxiety effect because of the inner-worries and self-doubts that are reported by math-anxious individuals (Ashcraft & Moore, 2009, p. 203).
  154. 154. Definition of “math anxiety” Feelings of tension and anxiety that interfere with the manipulations of numbers and the solving of mathematical problems in a wide variety of ordinary life and academic situations (Richardson & Suinn, 1972).
  155. 155. Other triggers for anxiety • Computerized testing: research shows that students may perform better on a paper-and-pencil test than on a computerized version of the same test. • Timed test: research shows that students may perform better in an untimed condition than in a time condition.
  156. 156. Motivation to math anxiousfriendly assessmentsBecause research shows that workingmemory can be compromised by mathanxiety, highly anxious individuals can beof disadvantage to some of the features intraditional assessments.
  157. 157. Modifications to timed tests • Traditional: time allotted for an entire test or for sections of a test • Modified: suggested time for the entire test, and devote a scoring weight for a timing rubric
  158. 158. Timing rubric – an example Suggesting time: 1 hour Weight: 10% of the test grade • Full credit for turning in the test within the suggested time
  159. 159. Timing rubric – an example Graduated scale for turning in the test for no more than the following duration: • 90% credit for 1 hour 10 minutes • 80% credit for 1 hour 20 minutes • 70% credit for 1 hour 30 minutes • 60% credit for 1 hour 45 minutes • 50% credit or lower for duration past 1 hour 45 minutes
  160. 160. Timing rubric – an example • It is not necessary to over emphasize BEFORE an assessment to the students of the scoring methods with a timing rubric. • But provide feedback to the students on their time management AFTER so that they still have a sense that timeliness is an expectation.
  161. 161. Open-ended questions • Emphasize to the students that there could be multiple correct responses • Often ask students to explain in plain English to transcend students’ concept that everyday informal math can be acceptable for school math. • Encourage students to discuss “What if” situation
  162. 162. Open-ended questions • Encourage students to discuss “What if” situation • For example, explain why 3 is not an even number. What if 3 is divisible by 2? • This is not proof by contradiction, but this is an introduction to help students validate their own thinking and use their ideas appropriately in developmental math courses.
  163. 163. Open-ended questions On multi-parts questions: • Do not lump all the parts into one single paragraph. • List one part at a time and leave space for students to respond, and then list the subsequent part below the space. • This is to help alleviate the working memory issue of math anxious students.
  164. 164. Computerized testing • Some students are anxious in this format. • Offer a paper-and-pencil alternative to students. • Also consider: offer a face-to-face verbal version with students who need accommodations in their learning and assessment.
  165. 165. Multiple choice questions • Often induce anxiousness • Multiple choice questions require letter recall. • Research shows that letter recall is compromised with math anxious individuals. • Avoid these questions and avoid letter transfer to separate answer sheets and Scantrons.
  166. 166. General principle onmodifying assessments• Begin with the ideas that working memory iscompromised, and evaluate a test where workingmemory is required as a part of the operation ofan assessment.• Design features on the operations of anassessment could be modified to created a moremath anxious friendly assessment.• However, students are still expected to accesstheir working memory of math content andknowledge to perform well.
  167. 167. Pins! SharingTeaching TipsThroughRebecca SchantzInstructor, MathematicsSt. Louis Community College - Wildwood
  168. 168. Survey your students easilywith Google DriveThe evolved CAT
  169. 169. Drop-down menus, FR, Scales, Grids,Checkboxes, Multiple Choice, …
  170. 170. Share results withstudents easily!
  171. 171. PollEverywhere.comLet students use their phone…like a CLICKER!
  172. 172. Free Response / MCText or send via hyperlink
  173. 173. MC …. Want to try?
  174. 174. IF-ATs: Immediate FeedbackAssessment Techniques
  175. 175. How do IF-ATs work?
  176. 176. Auspens: Refillable Dry EraseMarkers from Ecosmart 6 pens + 6 refill bottles < $50 I see a linear system!
  177. 177. Cool alternatives to flashcards
  178. 178. Oh! the possibilities
  179. 179. Smartpen Pencasts
  180. 180. Free Ways to Share Privately Dropbox Google Voice
  181. 181. The Kawaii “kah-why” Factor More of this means more of thisDr. Megan E. Bradley, Frostburg University, “Establishing the Right Mindset:Helping Your Students to Train Their Brains”
  182. 182. Students’ (formerly optional)Math Photos…to “First Day” Scavenger Hunt!Dr. Tami Eggleston, McKendree University, “Leveraging the TechnologyToolbox: Engaging Students Through Personalization and Belonging”
  183. 183. Our Pinterest Comfort LevelsPinterest Comfort Level PE
  184. 184. In closing, you’ve beenwarned…
  185. 185. Thank you!You can find my Pins when yousearch: Becky Schantz, Pinterest,“Teaching Tool Faves” Do you Pin or want to learn how? Just let me know! I can help. 
  186. 186. A Vision for LongTerm EducationalReformJon OaksMacomb Community Collegewww.jonoaks.com

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