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Invisible Families: Supporting Undocumented Families of Children with Special Needs

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Updated 2017

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Invisible Families: Supporting Undocumented Families of Children with Special Needs

  1. 1. INFORMING, EDUCATING, EMPOWERING FAMILIES 617-236-7210 | www.fcsn.org | fcsninfo@fcsn.org Invisible Population Parent Training and Information Center
  2. 2. Invisible Population Presented by: Olga M. Lopez Mariela Pijen Parent Training Information Center The Schrafft Center ● 529 Main Street, Suite 1M3 ● Boston, MA 02129 Federation for Children with Special Needs 617-236-7210 ● Toll Free 1-800-33-0688 ● Fax 617-241-0330 Federation for Children with Special Needs www.fcsn.org Parent Reaching Out www.parentreachingout.org
  3. 3. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs We are One Community
  4. 4. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Our Mission The Federation for Children with Special Needs provides information, support, and assistance to parents of children with disabilities, their professional partners, and their communities. We are committed to listening to and learning from families, and encouraging full participation in community life by all people, especially those with disabilities. Last year we touched more than 45,000 Lives!!!!!!!!
  5. 5. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Our Families
  6. 6. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Our Mission The mission of Parents Reaching Out (PRO) is to enhance positive outcomes for families and children in New Mexico through informed decision making, advocacy, education, and resources. This mission supports ALL families including those who have children with disabilities, and others who are disenfranchised. Parents Reaching Out achieves this by: • Developing family leadership • Connecting families to each other • Building collaborative partnerships • Providing families knowledge and tools to enhance their power
  7. 7. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Who We Are The Federation for Children with Special Needs promotes quality education, parent participation and access to quality health care services for all children, especially those with disabilities The contents of this workshop were developed under a grant from the US Department of Education, #H328M140014. However, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of US Department of Education; you should not assume endorsement by the federal government. The Parent Training and Information Center is a project of the Federation. It provides free information, support, technical assistance and affordable workshops to families who have children with disabilities and the professionals who work with them.
  8. 8. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Outreach Team Member • who adopt children with known or unknown disabilities • Varied family structures • Non English Speakers • Who have experiences with different disabilities . • Who seek a wide array of services and supports • Undocumented families with children with or without disability Represent a wide number of Federation projects Have an appreciation of the varied diversity of our callers  Experience Working with Families
  9. 9. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Programs & Services Federation for Children with Special Needs Special Education Center Health Advocacy Center Family Support Center Parent- Professional Leadership Center Family & Community Engagement Center The Federation manages over 15 projects related to supporting families whose children have special educational needs and special healthcare needs, including families of culturally and economically underserved populations by promoting family engagement within general education. The projects are organized into five centers:
  10. 10. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Programs at PRO Health Care Special Education Family Leadership and Advocacy Early Childhood  Parent Training and Information Center  FV F 2 F Healthcare Information Center  Parent To Parent  Families as Faculty  SpEd Clinics  Forward @ 14  Resource Center  Annual Family Leadership Conference  Family Support Groups  Sibshops  Volunteering
  11. 11. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs “All” Means All” Learning To Work With Undocumented Families
  12. 12. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs
  13. 13. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs We are Cultural Brokers Culture Brokering is… Bridging the gap between your organization and the diverse groups you communicate with. It’s also sometimes called “partnership brokering,” because it’s all about building stronger partnerships with people from diverse backgrounds (Jezewski & Sotnik, 2001) defined culture broking as “the act of bridging, linking or mediating between groups or persons of differing cultural backgrounds for the purpose of reducing conflict or producing change” Usually the culture broker is from one or other of the cultures but could be from a third group
  14. 14. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Hispanic Or Latino Cultures Family is the Center Cultural Differences Personal Communication Family Rights Trust
  15. 15. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Undocumented Latino Population in Massachusetts 5%
  16. 16. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs New Mexico More than 50,000 U.S. citizens in New Mexico live with at least one family member who is undocumented. • 85,000 undocumented immigrants comprised 37 percent of the immigrant population and 4 percent of the total state population in 2014. • 115,331 people in New Mexico, including 54,068 born in the United States, lived with at least one undocumented family member between 2010 and 2014.10
  17. 17. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs New Mexico  Nearly 1 in 10 New Mexico residents is an immigrant, while one in nine residents is a native-born U.S. citizen with at least one immigrant parent  In 2015, 196,955 immigrants (foreign-born individuals) comprised 9.4 percent of the state’s population  The top countries of origin for immigrants were Mexico (70 percent of immigrants), Germany (2 percent), China (2 percent), Vietnam (1.9 percent), and Canada (1.7 percent)  71,581 immigrants (36.3 percent) had naturalized as of 2015,naturalized U.S. citizens in 2015.5 and 47,620 immigrants were eligible to become 6
  18. 18. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs New Mexico  During the same period, 1 in 11 children in the state was a U.S. citizen living with at least one undocumented family member (44,653 children in total).  Approximately 6,000 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients live in New Mexico.12  As of 2016, 73 percent of DACA-eligible immigrants in New Mexico, or 7,410 people, had applied for DACA.
  19. 19. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs We Collaborate with Different Organizations Been part of GRULA Collaborating Governmental Mayor’s Office for Immigrants Advancement Collaborating with Community Leaders
  20. 20. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs We Collaborate with Different Organizations Collaborating with Civic Organizations Representing Families at the State House Participating Community Engagement Meetings
  21. 21. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Challenges of Undocumented Families Cultural Barriers Language Barriers Access to Medical Care Services Housing Communication with School
  22. 22. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Challenges for immigrants in NM Immigration polices and enforcement and deportation Limited access to health and mental health services Lack of equity in education Living alienated and in fear of be deported
  23. 23. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Strategies Finding Our Families Outreach through community partners • Soft calls to agencies that work with families with children with disabilities • Face to face meetings- with providers and families • Schedule and over view of your organization with staff • Email – follow up emails with invitation to activities • Booths and events • Word of Mouth –families will share information-
  24. 24. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Tell me Your Story All Our Families Matter 1. Kevin Colombian Family 2. Boston Public School parent Engagement 3. Honduras Family 4. Susan Chinese Family 5. Camilo Mexican Family 6. Jared Honduras Family
  25. 25. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Cultural Competency Check List Make the setting and environment more welcoming and attractive based on families’ cultural norms. Avoid stereotyping and misapplication of scientific knowledge. Include community input at the planning and development stage of projects. Use educational approaches and materials that will capture the attention of your intended audience.
  26. 26. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Cultural Competency Check List Find ways to partner with the community.  Understand there is no recipe.  Hire staff that reflect the client population.  Understand cultural competency is continually evolving.  Be creative in finding ways to communicate with population groups that have limited English- speaking proficiency.
  27. 27. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs The Bottom Line
  28. 28. © 2017 Federation for Children with Special Needs Contact Information If you have any question please call the Helping Line : 1800-331-0688 Spanish Line : 617- 399-8330 Email: olopez@fcsn.org https://www.facebook.com/fcsnfb https://fcsn.org/
  29. 29. INFORMING, EDUCATING, EMPOWERING FAMILIES 617-236-7210 | www.fcsn.org | fcsninfo@fcsn.org

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