Functional modeling

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Functional modeling

  1. 1. Functional Modeling FATMA AL-SAYEGH
  2. 2. Objectives ■Understand the rules and style guidelines for activity diagrams. ■Understand the rules and style guidelines for use cases and use case diagrams. ■Understand the process used to create use cases and use case diagrams. ■Be able to create functional models using activity diagrams, use cases, and use case diagrams. Slide 2
  3. 3. Functional models Used to document and understand requirements Describe business processes and interaction with environment Used for both as-is and to-be systems Two types: activity diagrams and use cases. Slide 3
  4. 4. Functional models Both activity diagrams and use cases are logical models describe the activities of a system without specifying how the activities are implemented Focus on how business runs instead of implementation details Slide 4
  5. 5. Business Process Modeling with Activity Diagrams ELEMENTS OF AN ACTIVITY DIAGRAM GUIDELINES FOR CREATING ACTIVITY DIAGRAMS Slide 5
  6. 6. Activity Diagrams Used for any process modeling activity, esp. business process modeling Process models show how a business system operates Processes/activities performed How objects/data move Slide 6
  7. 7. BPM With Activity Diagrams A number of activities support a business process across several departments Activity diagrams model the behavior in a business process Sophisticated data flow diagrams Addresses Parallel concurrent activities and complex processes Slide 7
  8. 8. Activity Diagram syntax Slide 8
  9. 9. Activity Diagram syntax Slide 9
  10. 10. Activity Diagram Example Slide 10
  11. 11. Activity Diagram Example Slide 11
  12. 12. Creating Activity Diagrams 1.Since an activity diagram can be used to model any kind of process ,you should set the context or scope of the activity being model. Once you have determined the scope, you should give the diagram an appropriate title. 2.You must identify the activities, control flows, and object flows that occur between the activities. 3.You should identify any decisions that are part of the process being modeled. 4.You should attempt to identify any prospects for parallelism in the process. 5.You should draw the activity diagram Slide 12
  13. 13. USE-CASE DESCRIPTIONS Slide 13
  14. 14. Use Cases Formal way of representing how system interacts with its environment. Illustrates the activities that are performed by users of a system Provide external or functional view of a process, not internal mechanism. Slide 14
  15. 15. What are Use-Case Descriptions? Describe basic functions of the system What the user can do How the system responds Use cases are building blocks for continued design activities. Slide 15
  16. 16. How Are Use-Cases Created? Two steps: Write text-based case descriptions Translate descriptions into diagrams Describes one and only one function, but may have multiple paths. Slide 16
  17. 17. Use Case Description Example Slide 17
  18. 18. Guidelines for Creating Use-Case Descriptions Slide 18 Write each step in “SVDPI” form Clarify initiator and receivers of action Write from independent observer perspective Write at same level of abstraction Ensure a sensible set of steps Apply KISS principle liberally Write repeating instructions after the set of steps to be repeated.
  19. 19. USE-CASE DIAGRAMS Slide 19
  20. 20. Syntax for Use-Case Diagram Slide 20
  21. 21. The Use-Case Diagram for Appointment System Slide 21
  22. 22. Use-Case Diagram with Specialized Actor Slide 22
  23. 23. Extend and Include Relationships Slide 23
  24. 24. CREATING USE- CASE DESCRIPTIONS AND USE-CASE DIAGRAMS Slide 24
  25. 25. Identifying the Major Use- Cases Review the activity diagram Identify the system’s boundaries List the primary actors List the goals of each primary actor Identify and write the major use- cases Carefully review and revise use- cases Slide 25
  26. 26. Expand the Major Use- Cases Choose one major use-case to expand Fill in details on the use-case template Fill in the steps of the normal flow of events Normalize the size of each step Describe alternate or exceptional flows Simplify and organize as necessary Slide 26
  27. 27. Confirm the Major Use Cases Review the current set Consider semantics and syntax Helpful to involve the users Iterate the entire set of steps until all use cases are defined Slide 27
  28. 28. Create the Use-Case Diagram Start with system boundary Place elements in order to be easy to read Place actors on the diagram Conclude by connecting actors to use cases by lines. Slide 28
  29. 29. Writing Effective Use-Case Descriptions Slide 29
  30. 30. Expanding the Domain Additional resources regarding use-cases and many other object-oriented development topics can be found at: : . .http //www omg org Slide 30
  31. 31. Summary Use-case descriptions are the basis for further analysis and design. Use-case diagrams present a graphical overview of the main functionality of a system. Slide 31

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