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Grafting mango on brazilian pepper root stock (2)

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It is a pioneer and good idea to be tried as in case of success it serves dual benefits
1- Propagate mango without the need of mango root stock which needs a lot of time and effort to overcome the problems of the unfavorable soil such as clay soil.
2- Eradicate the aggressively invasive Brazilian pepper trees from the garden in a very useful way not by just killing it.

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Grafting mango on brazilian pepper root stock (2)

  1. 1. GRAFTING MANGO SCION ON BRAZILIAN PEPPER ROOT STOCK (2) Dr. Fathi Neana, MD Chief of Orthopaedics Dr. Fakhry & Dr. Al-Garzaie Hospital Saudi Arabia January, 09 - 2018
  2. 2. The Brazilian pepper tree (chinus terebinthifolia ) is a species of flowering plant in the cashew family, Anacardiaceae, that is native to subtropical and tropical South America (southeastern Brazil, northern Argentina, and Paraguay). It is found in these states of Brazil: Alagoas, Bahia, Espírito Santo, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Pernambuco, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, São Paulo, and Sergipe. Common names include Brazilian peppertree, aroeira, rose pepper, broadleaved pepper tree, wilelaiki (or wililaiki), Christmasberry,, and Florida Holly. THE BRAZILIAN PEPPER TREE
  3. 3. The family Anacardiaceae contains poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac, and Schinus terebinthifolius, or Brazilian pepper-tree. People sensitive to poison ivy, oak or sumac may also be allergic to Brazilian pepper tree because it also has the potential to cause dermatitis to those with sensitive skin. Some people have also expressed respiratory problems associated with the bloom period of pepper tree. Brazilian pepper tree is native to Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil. Brazilian pepper tree was brought into Florida in mid-1800 for use as an ornamental plant. Its bright red berries and brilliant green foliage are used frequently as Christmas decorations. Distribution of Brazilian pepper tree throughout Florida is widespread, although limited to the warmer areas due to sensitivity to cold temperatures. Brazilian pepper can be found as far north as Levy and St. Johns Counties, and as far west as Santa Rosa County. It is an aggressive invader of disturbed habitats; this characteristic has led to its placement on the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council’s list of invasive species. Many plant communities such as hammocks, pinelands and mangrove forests are often invaded and dominated by Brazilian pepper tree. THE BRAZILIAN PEPPER TREE
  4. 4. Mangoes are juicy stone fruit (drupe) from numerous species of tropical trees belonging to the flowering plant genus Mangifera, cultivated mostly for their edible fruit. The majority of these species are found in nature as wild mangoes. The genus belongs to the cashew family Anacardiaceae. Mangoes are native to South Asia from where the "common mango" or "Indian mango, Mangifera indica, has been distributed worldwide to become one of the most widely cultivated fruits in the tropics. Other Mangifera species (e.g. horse mango, Mangifera foetida) are grown on a more localized basis. It is the national fruit of India, Pakistan, and the Philippines, and the national tree of Bangladesh. THE MANGO TREE
  5. 5. THE CLAY SOIL What is Clay Soil? A soil that is composed of mostly clay particles. Soil that consists of over 50% clay particles is referred to as “heavy clay.” Clay soil sticks to shoes and garden tools like glue, forms big clods that aren't easy to separate, and crusts over and cracks in dry weather. Positives of Clay Soil Clay soil has some good qualities : 1- Because of its density, it retains moisture well. 2- It also tends to be more nutrient-rich than other soil types. The reason for this is that the particles that make up clay soil are negatively charged. They attract and pick up positively charged particles, such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium. Negatives of Clay Soil Clay soil has the following negative qualities: 1- Slow draining 2-Slow to warm in the spring 3- Compacts easily, making it difficult for plant roots to grow 4- Tendency to heave in winter 5- Tendency to be alkaline a poorly growing more than one year old seed planted mango tree in clay soil
  6. 6. Mango fails to grow in my garden yellow very dense clay soil. It is too hard for the roots to propagate in such poorly aireated hard soil. on the other hand Brazilian pepper propagates very aggressively in this clay as well as other different soil types. a poorly growing more than one year old seed planted mango tree in clay soil WHY GRAFTING MANGO SCION ON BRAZILIAN PEPPER ROOT STOCK
  7. 7. IT IS WORTHED TO BE TRIED AS IN CASE OF SUCCES IT WILL SERVE A DUAL BENEFITS 1- TO PROPAGATE MANGO WHICH NEEDS A LOT OF TIME AND EFFORT TO OVERCOME THE PROBLEM OF CLAY SOIL 2- TO ERADICATE THE AGGRESSIVLY INVASIVE BRAZILLIAN PEPPER TREES FROM THE GARDEN IN A USEFUL WAY NOT BY KILLING IT WHY GRAFTING MANGO SCION ON BRAZILIAN PEPPER ROOT STOCK
  8. 8. Mango and Brazilian pepper both are from the same family family: Anacardiaceae which includes mango, pepper tree, pistachio, cashew family. What about the Compatibility? This is the aim of this trial WHY NOT
  9. 9. Top grafting technique Side grafting technique METHODS AND TECHNIQUE 1- Side or top grafting techniques was used in a 7 trials. 2- The scion: We use the terminal end of active branches, all leaves removed sometimes one or one third of a leave is kept. 3- Root stock: about one year old , strong enough , all leaves and side branches are removed. 4- Cleaning of scion and root stock by diluted povidone iodine 1-5% for 3 minutes followed by cleaning by water using soft cotton or cloths
  10. 10. METHODS AND TECHNIQUE 5- graft protected by transparent nylon bag allowing visualization of the graft at any time . 6- The bag kept closed for a period not less than 3weeks followed by partial and gradual removal by opening of the top part of the bag before complete removal to allow for gradual acclimatization. 7- Occasionally the bag is sprayed from inside by water to keep the medium humid.
  11. 11. EARLY RESULTS 4 out of 7 grafts still remain a live for more than 2monts ( time of preparing this presentation update ) with a 57.1% early success rate. This means that the scion is not rejected by the root stock probably because they are compatible within the same family. The 3 failed grafts show the signs of death in 7-10 days started by darkening and shrinking (mummification) at the bottom of the scion and progress proximally over the next days till it involve the top part. late results will be updated later on as my aim is to pay attention about this new idea so that a more professionals can carry on to show a better results. My faults is that this trial was done on November which is not the proper timing (February to May is preferable) also the weather was too cold in Alexandria in this month
  12. 12. EARLY RESULTS 7 WEEKS
  13. 13. EARLY RESULTS 7 WEEKS
  14. 14. EARLY RESULTS 9 WEEKS
  15. 15. EARLY RESULTS 9 WEEKS
  16. 16. THANK YOU

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